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Old 22nd August 2005, 07:41 AM   #1
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Default What does this mean?

The amp I'm working on now came with a power cord installed that looks like this:
[IMG]Click the image to open in full size.[/IMG]
What kind of plug is this? I assume it's from a country outside the US, but which one? Also, does anybody know what I need to do to get this amp ready to play on US current (I think we're 117V?) Please say I don't have to change the transformer or something like that...........
Thanks!!!
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Old 22nd August 2005, 08:28 AM   #2
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Quote:
What kind of plug is this? I assume it's from a country outside the US, but which one?
It looks like a Japanese plug, they often have a separate wire for grounding like you can see here, (I lived in japan 8 years so I have seen it often).

Quote:
Also, does anybody know what I need to do to get this amp ready to play on US current (I think we're 117V?) Please say I don't have to change the transformer or something like that...........
Japan is 100V, not 117V it can be an important difference in some cases as the raw transformer voltages inside the equipment will be 17% higher if you run on 117V instead of 100V, if electrolytic caps or other components are marginally designed it could be a problem. There are converters available from 117to 100V.

BTW, Japan use both 50Hz and 60Hz, 50Hz in the eastern part, (like Tokyo) and 60Hz in the Western part, (like Osaka).

Regards Hans
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Old 22nd August 2005, 09:30 PM   #3
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Yeah, I lived in Tokyo for 2 years, actually, and I was know that the plugs over there fit the regular Type A outlets here, but I think now that it's just an old style North American plug. The amp has a grounding switch that's been disconnected, and I think somebody must've just had this really old style grounded plug laying around or something and stuck it in. Anyway, thanks for answering!
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Old 22nd August 2005, 11:41 PM   #4
rdf is offline rdf  Canada
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Hi otokomae, you got me curious. Are both prongs the same width? I'm wondering if that's some sort of grounded cheater plug.
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Old 23rd August 2005, 01:44 AM   #5
arnoldc is offline arnoldc  Philippines
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The Philippines too. Some refrigerators, aircondition units sold here, have plugs like that. My AVR has the same exact plug
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Old 23rd August 2005, 08:36 AM   #6
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Well, the reason that this is such a mystery is because it came on a Fender '59 Bassman RI chassis. The amp dates to 1990, and I just didn't think that Fender would be putting that kind of plug on a new amp unless it was bound for some country that required it for grounding. However, there is a grounding switch on the amp that has been disconnected, and this cord appears to have been wired in in its place, so I'm thinking somebody put this on after they got b/c they got tired of using the ground switch. Either way, I'm ripping it out and replacing it as soon as I get another power cord for it. Man, this amp is just weird... I've got another strange cord question coming soon. Oh, any recommendations as to what power cord is best to use for it? I was going to set it up to use a detachable Monster Cable power cord...
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Old 23rd August 2005, 03:01 PM   #7
amperex is offline amperex  United States
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Default Fender Clone

You may have a fender amp that was a direct copy of the real Fender. I have seen one that was bought at a US base PX store back in the 1960s. It is so close, it is hard to tell the difference.
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Old 23rd August 2005, 04:50 PM   #8
Giaime is offline Giaime  Italy
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In fact, I believe it, since you're also the guy who posted about strange speakers plugs. It's hard that Fender made an amp like that... probably it's a rip-off.
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Old 23rd August 2005, 05:06 PM   #9
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actually, I finally got in touch with the guy I got this chassis from in the first place. It's a 1990, which was the first year Fender reissued these amps, and he says that in the beginning they were putting these plugs on them because that's the plug used in the original 1959 version that they were basing it off of. The original also came with a ground switch. Either way, I've already ordered a 3-prong from Mojotone, so I'll have this problem solved soon enough...

And it's really funny that they would go through all that trouble copying the original (I can't imagine that anyone would've complained about changing the plug) but then they used PCB construction, which was the biggest complaint when these first came out!
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