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-   -   What do you guys use to drill holes on chassis?? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubes-valves/46037-what-do-you-guys-use-drill-holes-chassis.html)

jamesjung21 18th November 2004 07:45 PM

What do you guys use to drill holes on chassis??
 
G'd day!

What do you guys use to drill holes for tube sockets on a metal chassis?? A reamer to enlarge holes to right sizes??:confused:

Only bi-metal holesaws seem to work well on metal (esp. steel), but they are quite expensive...

Is there any alternative method that you guys use?

Cheers,
JayJay

markp 18th November 2004 07:55 PM

I use Greenlee hole punches. They make perfect holes with no burrs or bent metal.

If you are using aluminum you can also use a 'unibit' stepped drill bit with multiple sizes on one bit. It looks like a tall pyramid with a step ever 1/4" and a change of 1/8" per step.

cogsncogs 18th November 2004 10:49 PM

Hole punches
Stepped drill bits on aluminum, mild steel
Bi-Metal hole saws
A drill press comes in handy!
And a reemer where needed. Good for removing burrs!
Sometimes you can catch them on sale. If you drill alot of holes they are worth it...
Have a look here, you'll be amazed at what you can find using the search button! :D ;)

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...339&highlight=

And here:

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...=&pagenumber=2

Wayne

EC8010 18th November 2004 11:12 PM

A chassis punch.

Hand reamers produce octagonal holes. Hole saws are inaccurate (to guide), produce a lot of heat and an inaccurate messy hole. Stepped drills are inaccurate, incredibly noisy, and quite dangerous; other than that, they're fine.

I've used all of them. A chassis punch costs less than the valve that's going in there.

If you're really impecunious, use an Abrafile in a full-size hacksaw frame. You need a fair amount of skill...

SY 18th November 2004 11:20 PM

Greenlee punches are great. Two sizes will accommodate 99% of what you'll ever need. Even better is a milling machine- the punches are fine on thin sheet metal, but once you start looking at thicker chasses, you'll be crying for a Bridgeport.

EC8010 18th November 2004 11:27 PM

Shopping list for ECL82 amplifier:

4 x ECL82
mains transformer
2 x output transformers
connectors
Rs & Cs
Bridgeport milling machine




Personally, I'd love a Bridgeport in place of my Emco clone, but what with one thing and another...

SY 18th November 2004 11:39 PM

I'll be a nice guy this time and not do what I did when the subject of electron microscopes came up (posted a picture of me leaning on mine with a big grin on my face).

OTOH, I'd love to have a nice DSO with FFT capability like yours. I'll put that on my shopping list, right below the blond twin stewardesses.

EC8010 18th November 2004 11:47 PM

I'm lost for (polite, politically acceptable) words. Bar stewards come to mind, I can't think why - must be your mention of stewardesses.

markp 18th November 2004 11:57 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by EC8010
A chassis punch.

Hand reamers produce octagonal holes. Hole saws are inaccurate (to guide), produce a lot of heat and an inaccurate messy hole. Stepped drills are inaccurate, incredibly noisy, and quite dangerous; other than that, they're fine.

I've used all of them. A chassis punch costs less than the valve that's going in there.

If you're really impecunious, use an Abrafile in a full-size hacksaw frame. You need a fair amount of skill...

Where do you get your punches from? A good quality Greenlee can cost from $30 to $250 depending on size and shape!

cogsncogs 19th November 2004 12:07 AM

Quote:

Hole saws are inaccurate (to guide), produce a lot of heat and an inaccurate messy hole. Stepped drills are inaccurate, incredibly noisy, and quite dangerous; other than that, they're fine.
Yupp! That's why I use a (big **s) drill press where I can. I try to steer away from hole saws, very inaccurate-HOT! Buy two hole punches, sizes 3/4" (19-20mm), and 1 1/8" (29-30mm). I only use reemers for small holes, like for screws and such to enlarge slightly, de-burr. Stepped bits work fine if you take your time and use a good drill press (at the right speed) and a piece of scrap wood underneath for support.
And for front panels or thick metal you could use/send out to Front Panel Express using a neat, fun free program to design, layout your panels or even a chassis!

www.frontpanelexpress.com/

Wayne


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