Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Tubes / Valves

Tubes / Valves All about our sweet vacuum tubes :) Threads about Musical Instrument Amps of all kinds should be in the Instruments & Amps forum

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th August 2004, 01:27 AM   #1
Magura is offline Magura  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Magura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Denmark, Viborg
Default Anyone know what this is?? Strange tube/ bulb.

Ive gotten a bunch of tubes lately, one of the types I have probs finding any info on is this one, I believe it's some sort of bulb.

The russian description said vaccuum photo element...thats greek to me

http://www.briangt.com/gallery/album04/PICT0081

http://www.briangt.com/gallery/album04/PICT0082

Cheers

Magura
__________________
Everything is possible....to do the impossible just takes a little while longer.
www.class-a-labs.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 03:41 AM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Sch3mat1c's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Send a message via ICQ to Sch3mat1c Send a message via AIM to Sch3mat1c
Yeah, looks like a projector bulb to me... if you have a whole bunch you wouldn't lose anything by plugging it into a 120 or 240V variac and seeing where it gets nice and white hot.

Tim
__________________
Seven Transistor Labs
Projects and Resources
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 04:58 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
rcavictim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Next to an open wormhole NW of Toronto
Magura,

Does an ohm meter show any continuity between the end pins? My initial reaction is that this is a small short arc lamp which would show no continuity. If that is the case a rather specialized power supply is needed to light it. It seems very dark. Unless that is a special filter coating the bulb has long use on it.

If you get no continuity try placing it in the microwave oven with a small glass of water to protect the oven for minimum load requirement. If it contains a noble gas like xenon under pressure it may glow for you helping identify the gas, and the lamp type. Xenon would glow whitish. Do not run for more than a couple of seconds.

I'd advise against "just plugging it into the 120 volt mains" in case it is a low voltage filament lamp. That will instantly ruin it.

Do you collect interesting vacuum tubes as a hobby? I do.
__________________
On April 01,2012, my radioastronomy Project TARGET SETI search succeeded. The signal came via extradimensional subspace, not radio waves. I now get a lot of 'visitors'. I took my avatar pic of one friend watching me in my work yard from just 20 ft. away.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 09:03 AM   #4
EC8010 is offline EC8010  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
EC8010's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Near London. UK
I hope it isn't a Xenon, because they are pressurised to 5 atmospheres and are therefore extremely dangerous.
__________________
The loudspeaker: The only commercial Hi-Fi item where a disproportionate part of the budget isn't spent on the box. And the one where it would make a difference...
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 09:09 AM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
This looks like a foto tube, not a projector, but a detector that converts light into current, I had some of those once. I believe they are also called photo multiplier tubes. There is some info on the net.

Jan Didden
__________________
Never explain - your friends don't need it and your enemies won't believe you anyway - E. Hubbart
Check out Linear Audio Vol 7
!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 09:58 AM   #6
Duo is offline Duo  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Duo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Send a message via ICQ to Duo
I used to have a photomultiplier tube.

It was used in a 16mm projector to measure the light transmissivity of a film soundtrack and was connected to the input of an amplifier. A very interesting way to retrieve sound information. I never ran a film through it, so I have no idea how it was for sound quality.
__________________
-- Duo, W1ngs, VA7MON, and lesser known handles. --
-- http://www.w1ngselectronics.com -- My Work and Projects --
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 10:12 AM   #7
diyAudio Senior Member
 
fdegrove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Belgium
Hi,

Quote:
I believe they are also called photo multiplier tubes.
That's what I think they are as well...Similar in function to the RCA GL-930 perhaps.

Magura,

If you like I can forward whatever info you have to a local tube dealer.

Meanwhile maybe this site can be helpful with the rest of your stash:

FROZEN NUGGETS...

Cheers,
__________________
Frank
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 10:13 AM   #8
EC8010 is offline EC8010  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
EC8010's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Near London. UK
Default Not a photomultiplier.

It isn't a photomultiplier - they have a sequence of anodes known as dynodes that deliberately stimulate secondary emission at each anode so that the initial electron produced by the original photon is muliplied 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 etc, depending on how many dynodes are present (ten is common). The dynodes look rather like louvres, and the valve has a pin per dynode, so they always need bases with lots of pins
__________________
The loudspeaker: The only commercial Hi-Fi item where a disproportionate part of the budget isn't spent on the box. And the one where it would make a difference...
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 10:55 AM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
Aha? The tube I had did have internal louvres, looked kind of like a staircase for the multiplying effect you mention, but AFAIR there was only a single output pin. The multiplying effect was kind of internal.

Jan Didden
__________________
Never explain - your friends don't need it and your enemies won't believe you anyway - E. Hubbart
Check out Linear Audio Vol 7
!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th August 2004, 11:33 AM   #10
AuroraB is offline AuroraB  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
AuroraB's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Norway, -north of the moral circle..
Most certainly not a PM tube. Even if the voltage divider for the dynode chain was internal, which I have never seen, a PM tube is usually a sub-millamp device. There is also several types of dynode chains, depending on use.
I used to do PM tubes and photon counting for more than 20 years.....

Kind of looks like a Xenon projector lamp, though, as indicated...
I used to be a projector machinist in the very early 70s, but we still used arc lamps (!). Xenon projectors were part of the theory , though.
I actually have a license for such work...... makes me wonder where that is lurking..................
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
strange tube gianis33 Tubes / Valves 19 26th January 2009 12:23 AM
strange tube adalin Tubes / Valves 5 28th August 2007 09:52 PM
strange tube G1 S/5 Mr. Triatic Tubes / Valves 22 6th June 2006 10:42 AM
strange tube gianis Tubes / Valves 10 7th March 2005 10:42 PM
Strange Tube adalin Tubes / Valves 11 14th July 2004 07:30 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:54 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2