Safety Practices, General and Ultra-High Voltage - Page 30 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Tubes / Valves

Tubes / Valves All about our sweet vacuum tubes :) Threads about Musical Instrument Amps of all kinds should be in the Instruments & Amps forum

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 1st September 2013, 06:58 AM   #291
diyAudio Member
 
rfengineer2013's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Colorado
That guy is a contender for the Darwin Award!
__________________
-- Just an average Man of Bronze --
  Reply With Quote
Old 4th September 2013, 01:01 PM   #292
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ISANDO GAUTENG
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt.B.H. View Post
Hey Rewind, don't really know about using a Dremel for this. Seems a bit harsh but I use a fibre glass pencil. Works a treat for all sorts of contacts etc.

Cheers
Matt.
Matt and all others use rust REMOVER in future it is safer than grinding those slender tube pins even aluminium
  Reply With Quote
Old 4th September 2013, 08:20 PM   #293
Rewind is offline Rewind  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Whatever chemicals you use instead of a dremel tool must damn strong. I had to cover the same area with the grinder three times to get a shiny surface on these vintage tubes. I think buying cheaper tubes and get good contact is better than buying hyped tubes for a hundred bucks and not dare to touch them.
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th September 2013, 03:31 PM   #294
Rewind is offline Rewind  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
MDF contain formaldehyde, which is classed possibly a carcinogen by the WHO. This applies to the dust, but also the formaldehyde gas that keep oozing out during the lifetime of the speaker. The gas can be trapped with the right kind of paint. Oil based paints were less effective in trapping the gas. The dust is also very allergenic. Knowing this I am trying to stick to as much natural wood as possible, when building speakers and horns.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2013, 10:15 PM   #295
diyAudio Member
 
TehSmokeyMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Nether (-lands)
Well, I have seen a lot of very good safety tips:

Always assume the circuit is hot, unless you have measured it,
Use proper tools,
Don't go fooling around if you're oblivious about the risks,
Don't get cocky, kid,
Get help from a pro if you can,
etc.

But how about:

Think about what you're wearing (a woolen or fleece sweater CAN fry your electronics, or you if you have bad luck).

And one not a lot of people'll think about, but an important one I've learned in basic training:

GET ENOUGH SLEEP! You can do some types of work if you've spent the previous night patrolling, training, partying, gaming, watching a LOTR/Star wars/Star Trek/Grand Designs/anime marathon, designing/drawing a kick-*** amp, listening to Bach/Tchaikovsky/etc. or what ever, but that will be severely limited to work you don't have to have a clear head.

You WILL make mistakes if you've not had enough sleep, and that will get you a ride to the ER or morgue if you're working with lethal systems/voltages/chemicals/tools/equipment/heavy machinery etc.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2013, 10:25 PM   #296
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Stewartsville, NJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wavebourn View Post
Water conducts electricity!
No it doesn't, the impurities in the water do.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th October 2013, 12:42 AM   #297
diyAudio Member
 
TehSmokeyMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Nether (-lands)
Crank up the power enough and you can run electricity through almost anything
__________________
I don't tell you how to tell me what to do, so don't tell me how to do what you tell me to do... -Bender "Bending" Rodriguez
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th May 2014, 05:35 AM   #298
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nicosia
Hello to all of you.......Something more as regards safety....
Have one of your hands in your pocket when you do measurements and adjustments on a live circuit.
Do not step on the floor without shoes.
Use well insulated probe leads.
Keep your mind in what you are doing and think twice before you take any action.
Make sure you have unplugged the equipment before you put your hands inside the unit.
Place a sign near the equipment to remind you that lethal voltages are involved " Attention !!!! Death hazard!!! This unit operates at 5000V !!! Death is permanent !!!
If you have to work alone pay double attention.
Hope that everything would be fine

Take care!
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd May 2014, 03:25 PM   #299
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Western China
Quote:
Originally Posted by TehSmokeyMan View Post
GET ENOUGH SLEEP! You can do some types of work if you've spent the previous night patrolling, training, partying, gaming, watching a LOTR/Star wars/Star Trek/Grand Designs/anime marathon, designing/drawing a kick-*** amp, listening to Bach/Tchaikovsky/etc. or what ever, but that will be severely limited to work you don't have to have a clear head.
Just what I was going to post.

I often get ideas late at night after mulling over a topic all day or so.

-If you are middle-aged, don't work when tired.

-If it is past 800pm, I don't work on it. I get some sleep and do it the next day.

-I make notes and do it the following morning after a cup of coffee.

-Have GFCI/RCD (Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupt/Residual-Current Device), Ground Fault, Ground Lifter on your workbench line.

-One hand in the chassis at a time.

-Always pull the plug and treble check it, put it in the middle of the work area to see that it is not plugged in. Clear uncluttered work area so it's obvious that one plug goes to that one chassis.

-Bleed the HV line, caps and transformers, with resistors and measure it with a meter before working on it.

-Having a friend or family member around when tinkering is best, just in case, but this hobby is often solitary so this suggestion will be impractical for most of us.

Last edited by miragem3i; 23rd May 2014 at 03:35 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2014, 01:00 AM   #300
opcom is offline opcom  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Texas
In a new but rather low-remunerating job I am doing QA on control panels with PLCs and VFDs on them. There is usually a cabinet and the power per VFD is up to 20HP so far. I am just working on the smaller units.

The typical voltage is 460V 3 phase. The supply to the test station is 30A through breakers. After a month of this, I find myself getting a bit accustomed to it, as I have done wit the higher DC voltages in the home built stuff I work with.

Complacency is extremely dangerous and this is the reason why there are not only safety rules but definite procedures when 'breaking the plane'. That is defined as the plane of the otherwise closed door of the cabinet.

The same consideration should be given to the underside of the chassis of tube equipment. There is really no telling when a 300-400VDC circuit will give only a nasty shock and when it ill be deadly.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Workbench safety practices? Stormrider Equipment & Tools 3 3rd August 2008 05:08 PM
Safety with high volts: 101 rick57 Tubes / Valves 34 1st April 2005 04:51 PM
Safety Practices, General and Ultra-High Voltage DrDeville Everything Else 49 23rd September 2004 09:31 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:38 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2