Baking Tubes Procedure - Help... - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Tubes / Valves

Tubes / Valves All about our sweet vacuum tubes :) Threads about Musical Instrument Amps of all kinds should be in the Instruments & Amps forum

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 2nd March 2013, 09:38 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
FullRangeMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Brazil
Default Baking Tubes Procedure - Help...

Hallo all,
I hear about baking NOS tubes in a electric owen before use, but I was unable to find a topic in this site and abroad.
The tubes for baking are 6N1P, 6N6P, 6C33, GM70, they are all NOS, never used from the 1980s.
Any info are welcome, mainly on time and temperature etc...
Thanks
__________________
>Never go to a psychiatrist, adopt a cat or dog from the streets. On the streets pets live only two years average.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 09:40 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: The Jurassic Coast, England. GB
Send a message via Skype™ to JonSnell Electronic
Why would anyone wish to do this and what do you hope to achieve out of it apart from burnt fingers and possible permanent damage to the valves!
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 09:44 PM   #3
TheGimp is offline TheGimp  United States
diyAudio Member
 
TheGimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Johnson City, TN
Put the tubes in the oven with it cold.

Set oven for 175C and turn it on.

Let it run for 3 hours, turn it off and let it cool before opening the door.

This discolors Bakelite bases on octal tubes.

I believe Morgan Jones is credited with coming up with this procedure.

It is supposed to help activate the getter and remove residual gas in the tube.

I have experienced fewer problems with NOS tubes since I started doing this. Maybe it works, maybe it is just coincidence.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 09:58 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Being as closed minded and ignorant as I am, I can not see what this would achieve even with the premise of activating the getter by heating it to get rid of residual gases.

At 175 C for three hours is more like cooking an unstuffed turkey, but wouldn't that already be surpassed by just turning on your amp and powering up the tube and heaters and playing music through it for a good while? The barium getter would be right hot and more than ready to get every molecule of gas at running temp. All of this without risking damage to the base or envelope (mostly by being overly eager and playing hot potato with an 805 or a 12AX7).
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 09:59 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
FullRangeMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Brazil
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGimp View Post
Put the tubes in the oven with it cold.

Set oven for 175C and turn it on.

Let it run for 3 hours, turn it off and let it cool before opening the door.

This discolors Bakelite bases on octal tubes.

I believe Morgan Jones is credited with coming up with this procedure.

It is supposed to help activate the getter and remove residual gas in the tube.

I have experienced fewer problems with NOS tubes since I started doing this. Maybe it works, maybe it is just coincidence.
Thanks Bro, I appreciated it.
I just read someone do it with 130ºC for 3 hours;
Maybe I would start it with 100ºC for 3 hours with the small tubes, and next day up to 120ºC, unless best suggestion...
__________________
>Never go to a psychiatrist, adopt a cat or dog from the streets. On the streets pets live only two years average.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 10:03 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: The Jurassic Coast, England. GB
Send a message via Skype™ to JonSnell Electronic
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGimp View Post
Put the tubes in the oven with it cold.

Set oven for 175C and turn it on.

Let it run for 3 hours, turn it off and let it cool before opening the door.

This discolors Bakelite bases on octal tubes.

I believe Morgan Jones is credited with coming up with this procedure.

It is supposed to help activate the getter and remove residual gas in the tube.


I have experienced fewer problems with NOS tubes since I started doing this. Maybe it works, maybe it is just coincidence.
How can one remove "Residual Gas" from a vacuum?
The heaters run at excess of 500 degrees Celcius, what is a domestic oven going to acheive?

What a load of rubbish!
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 10:10 PM   #7
TheGimp is offline TheGimp  United States
diyAudio Member
 
TheGimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Johnson City, TN
If a tube develops a leak the getter (flash) will turn white even at room temperature. Thus, the getter is still active. It works long after it is flashed onto the inside glass.

Since reaction with residual gas is temperature dependent as most reactions are, heating the tube will accelerate this action.

The procedure is based on sound principals.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 10:12 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
FullRangeMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Brazil
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harleyjon View Post
How can one remove "Residual Gas" from a vacuum?
The heaters run at excess of 500 degrees Celcius, what is a domestic oven going to acheive?

What a load of rubbish!
The getter is supposed to do it if it is hot.
After 6 month or so the getter goes to sleep and need to be reactivated before usage.

I do not like to use my amp as test pilot for NIB NOS tubes made in overseas about 30 years ago.
The tubes need to be heated before receive HV in a amp.
__________________
>Never go to a psychiatrist, adopt a cat or dog from the streets. On the streets pets live only two years average.

Last edited by FullRangeMan; 2nd March 2013 at 10:15 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 10:14 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: The Jurassic Coast, England. GB
Send a message via Skype™ to JonSnell Electronic
Not convinced as this defies science and as everyone knows, electron flow and the way they flow is scientific knowledge, not an old wifes tale. There is, by default, no gas in a vacuum.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd March 2013, 10:17 PM   #10
TheGimp is offline TheGimp  United States
diyAudio Member
 
TheGimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Johnson City, TN
The "vacuum" in vacuum tubes is actually a partial pressure, albeit a very low partial pressure around .0001 torr iirc. There is no such thing as an absolute vacuum unless it happens at Absolute Zero", which room temperature is not.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Baking a pcb for removing moisture gmphadte Solid State 6 9th November 2012 09:24 AM
Best procedure? martinschki Twisted Pear 2 27th January 2011 05:44 PM
amplifier .... procedure east electronics Solid State 12 26th May 2010 10:25 PM
Playmaster setup procedure PeteMcK Solid State 5 23rd September 2009 09:18 AM
Speaker design procedure maylar Multi-Way 18 29th January 2004 03:47 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:44 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2