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Old 3rd May 2012, 10:25 AM   #1
nazaroo is offline nazaroo  Canada
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Default What is it? Tube guessology

I thought it might be fun to try and figure out what some of these old tubes in my stash were, and what they came out of.

The following one I picked up as part of a collection of glass,
which I had grabbed for the round bulbs.

Needless to say, its too big for my tube-tester.

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Old 3rd May 2012, 10:28 AM   #2
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Rectifier.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 10:34 AM   #3
nazaroo is offline nazaroo  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Berry View Post
Rectifier.
Nice guess: It probably is.
The the getters (?) on the bottom looke like barbells!

I'm not sure why the anode (?) is formed from 9 disks.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 10:40 AM   #4
nazaroo is offline nazaroo  Canada
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I was recently looking through my stash to see if I had any tubes that used Uranium-glass in any part of their assembly.
I didn't notice any. Also known as 'green-glass',
I think it was used because its heat-expansion was similar to the metal electrodes, and so it would keep the seals tight
under a variety of temperatures.

Here's another (a transmitting tube I think).
I'm guessing these are for serious RF transmitters,
but I have no idea what kind.

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Last edited by nazaroo; 3rd May 2012 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 05:20 PM   #5
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Hi nazaroo,

I guess it's an EIMAC 75-TL.

Best regards!
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Old 3rd May 2012, 05:23 PM   #6
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Nice transmitting triode.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 05:47 PM   #7
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The last picture shows the grid connection, revealing it as a triode. The number is visible (backwards) in the previous picture, 250TH, an older Eimac transmitting type.
With plenty of drive, the right transformers, and fingers safely away from the plate cap, it might be the center of a great sounding conversation piece.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 08:01 PM   #8
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The first tube is a type 6303 aka X-80. It's a high vacuum high voltage rectifier that was made by United Electronics, Newark NJ. You can read about it here. And "riccoryder" is spot on about the second one being an early style Eimac 250TH

I used to buy and sell surplus industrial tubes for gain in years past when they were more plentiful and saleable. In the early sixties Eimac was using a "green glass" at the base of some of their tubes. I don't know if it was urainum (Vaseline) glass or not. But I do know from much experience that the green base tubes had a much greater failure rate from vacuum leakage then other non-green types. So much so that I quit buying them simply based on the color. If that glass was supposed to improve the seal, then it was a failure in my book. They also quit using it some time later.
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Old 3rd May 2012, 09:43 PM   #9
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All of the lemon-lime epoxy coated 4-65A's I've ever seen have had loss of vacuum. I assumed that the base coating was a failed workaround for a known defect. I feel sorry for any troops that had to depend on them. Those I tried of the regular flavor all worked. I've seen a few c.r.t.s that had similar treatment. The 15GP22 in the original 1954 RCA CTC-2/CT-100 color television used epoxy on the front seal, apparently causing nearly all to fail.

I don't think there was anything radioactive in the epoxy, but 4-65A's do use a low concentration of thorium in the filaments. Some have the radiation icon on the bottle. I have not seen the original hazard sheets.
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Old 4th May 2012, 08:58 AM   #10
nazaroo is offline nazaroo  Canada
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Here's what I found:

Uranium glass in Vacuum tube
One unique application of Vaseline glass (Uranium glass) is the vacuum tube.
The Museum in the University of Electricity and Communication(in Tokyo) owns more than 10,000 vacuum tubes from 1910 to the current age.
I visited here in 2009, and I and the curators found more than 10 vacuum tubes which use uranium glass.

Vacuum tube exhibition room in the Museum Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size. 

The following are the vacuum tubes using uranium glass.
Upper photo :No.1,to 5,
Lower photo:No.6-7 (No.2) No.8 to11

1.,EIMAC VT-127-A
2,PL PL-185 USN-CBZC-527A (PENTA LABORATORIES)
3,GE GL-4-125A/4D21 (General Electric)
4,EIMAC 4-65A JAN-CIM4-65A
5,EIMAC 100TH JAN-CIM-100TH
-------------------------------------
6,Not uranium glass
7,EIMAC 3-50A4 JAN-35T
8,PHILIPS JAN-CNY-3C24/VT-204
9,PL PL-4-400A JAN-CBCZ-4-100A
10,EIMAC 100th 100th/VT218
11,EIMAC 15E Click the image to open in full size. No.4
,EIMAC 4-65A JAN-CIM4-65A
under UV-light

Top and lower cathode are uranium glass. Click the image to open in full size. No.5
EIMAC 100TH JAN-CIM-100TH
under UV-light
Top and lower cathode are uranium glass.
Click the image to open in full size.

Largest vacuum tube in the Museum.
JAN-CWL-861
(marked as Westinghouse)

natural air-cooling 4-diodes.
made in 1927
Click the image to open in full size. The following 2 tubes are mine.
Left small one is 3C24, and marked as JAN-3C24/VT-204, Made in USA Phillips.

Right large one (21cm length) is 5C22, and marked as JAN-CADK-5C22/HT-415, made in USA/ Kuthe Laboratories.Top 5cm is uranium glass. This was used as military Radar in the World War II.

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