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WILD1 25th February 2012 03:48 AM

Electrical flow
 
Are schematics for amps written with conventional flow[positive to negative] or electron flow [negative to positive]. Kind of new at this.

Thanx,
WILD1

TheGimp 25th February 2012 03:56 AM

Tubes are Positive to Negative (electron flow).

Sand is is negative to positive (hole flow).

GloBug 25th February 2012 03:56 AM

Good question. Most people think lightning comes from the sky, few know that it actually comes from the ground.

Semantics really as it's mostly considered in circuits, having said that it's usually the "positive" that is switched or controlled.

GloBug 25th February 2012 03:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheGimp (Post 2921706)
Tubes are Positive to Negative (electron flow).

Sand is is negative to positive (hole flow).

I don't notice the difference in schematics, they both appear the same to me.

Miles Prower 25th February 2012 04:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WILD1 (Post 2921702)
Are schematics for amps written with conventional flow[positive to negative] or electron flow [negative to positive]. Kind of new at this.

Thanx,
WILD1

Conventional. So far as I know, the only ones to use actual electron flow is the FAA. Schemes for solid state devices always have the arrows pointing from P type layers to N type.

leadbelly 25th February 2012 04:00 AM

Thanks for the funniest thread I've seen in a while :cheers:

aardvarkash10 25th February 2012 04:01 AM

odd q. Forget + and - think anode->cathode

There is VERY little in a schematic that you actually have to know that electrons even exist. How the electrons move is even less relevant.

Enzo 25th February 2012 04:05 AM

Oh, the wonderful debate that always springs from this...

Speaking only for myself, and as someone who learned his electronics back in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was mainly tubes, I am aware that tubes run on electron flow, but I tend to think in terms of conventional current. having said that, when I look at a schematic, neither of those things is on my mind.

It doesn;t really - in my view - matter whether there are electrons rushing one way through a resistor or conventional current flowing the other way. WHat matters is that one end of the resistor is more positive than the other, or whatever else is appropriate in the instance. My meter doesn't care or determine which system caused the voltage it measures. And I don;t see schematics as having to decide on it.

A rectifier diode symbol on a drawing "points" one direction. I don;t care if I use conventional current, which flows the way the arrow points, of if I use electron flow which means they go the other way. Either way I am going to find a positive voltage on my filter cap. Or whatever. To me, those two systems are about trying to understand how the circuit functions, and whichever one you find the easiest to understand, would be where I;d start.

If I have a triode tube, the harder it conducts, the greater will be the current through it, and so the greater will be the voltage drops across the cathode resistor and plate resistor. The net effect in a typical stage would be the plate voltage drops and the cathode voltage rises.


Others may disagree with this viewpoint.

GloBug 25th February 2012 04:09 AM

I think its important you know where the current is coming from, you sure don't want B+ coming from the chassis.

Valid question.

leadbelly 25th February 2012 04:13 AM

ROTFLOL this is grade 12 physics stuff!


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