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Old 17th May 2011, 08:24 PM   #1
tmblack is offline tmblack  United Kingdom
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Default Tools for Cutting Tube Socket Holes?

Seems there are few options for cutting holes for tube socket these days.
What do you use to make the 3/4" and 1 1/8" holes to mount the tube sockets in a steel chassis?
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Old 17th May 2011, 08:28 PM   #2
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I went to E-Bay and searched for "Hole Cutter" A 32mm hole cutter was good enough for 1 1/8" and 20mm good enough for 3/4".
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Old 17th May 2011, 08:35 PM   #3
arhi45 is offline arhi45  Romania
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12-28mm TITANIUM STEP DRILL cone sheet metal cutter 28 en vente sur eBay.fr (fin le 28-mai-11 20:24:58 Paris)

I bought one of these 5 years ago, still works.
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Old 17th May 2011, 09:14 PM   #4
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Greenlee punches are the old standby for us here in the US. 1-1/8" is good for octals, 3/4" for miniature tube sockets.
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Old 17th May 2011, 09:18 PM   #5
Trout is offline Trout  United States
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If you are willing to hunt estate sales, auctions & garage sales occasionally you can get some nice Greenlee Knockout punch sets cheap. I managed to get 15 different sizes for $25.00 a few years back.

If you do not abuse them, they last generations. New they are fairly expensive.

Lots of them on eBay as well.
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Old 17th May 2011, 09:26 PM   #6
SY is offline SY  United States
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There's Greenlee punches and there's everything else. I've had mine for over 40 years and hundreds of amplifiers, and they still work like new.

The only good alternative is a top quality mill bit and a Bridgeport. If you're strong, patient, and meticulous, you could use drills and a file and get the job done about a hundred times more slowly.
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Old 17th May 2011, 09:28 PM   #7
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In the UK they are known as Q-max chassis cutters.

EDIT: and they still exist!

http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts/...Hole%20Cutters

Last edited by cliffforrest; 17th May 2011 at 09:30 PM. Reason: Found URL
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Old 17th May 2011, 09:43 PM   #8
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I'll have to agree with SY. Accept no substitutes as far as the Greenlee brand is concerned. I built a couple of 1930's and '50's reproduction ham rigs using "Brand X" punches. They got the job done, but there was quite a bit of dressing up to be done with a file afterward. The punches themselves were quite crappy; the screw was hard to advance and the waste piece kept getting jammed inside the punch.

I bought a couple of the real deal immediately afterward and have never regretted it.
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Old 17th May 2011, 09:59 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arhi45 View Post
Step drills are fine except for really thin material. They tend to tear the material if it is really thin or perforated. Hole cutters on the other hand act like hydraulic punches and will produce a neat and clean cut hole - no need for dressing or deburring.
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Old 17th May 2011, 10:01 PM   #10
SY is offline SY  United States
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One trick- use a spray fluorocarbon lubricant between the head of the bold and the die. I spray that each time I use the punch and it makes the cutting process much easier.
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