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Old 20th February 2011, 12:06 PM   #1
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Unhappy Can 110V Quad IIs be configured to 220V?

Hi Friends
I have two Quad IIs in my garage, waiting to be restaurated.
However, when taking a closer look, it seems these are two 110V units

Is it possible to reconnect the QII power transformer from 110V to 220V if the cover is removed (and some of the tar I guess) ?

Pix
Sweden
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Old 20th February 2011, 01:10 PM   #2
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No problem removing the cover. Did it on my OPTs(covered the paint with cardboard) but dont remember what temperature I "baked" them in. Report back abut the as I must remove the heater CT-tap on mine.

Last edited by revintage; 20th February 2011 at 01:18 PM.
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Old 20th February 2011, 01:48 PM   #3
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Hi Lars
Yes, I just wait for the icebears to leave my garage port, or att least for the temperature to go below -10 degrees (Brrrrrr), then I will try to remove the tar from the cover.

However it would be interesting if someone could confirm that the QII power transformer has the oportunity to be reconnected for 220V before open it up

Brgds
Pix
Sweden
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Old 20th February 2011, 02:30 PM   #4
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Lets hope the circuit diagram is wrong. Otherwise one could maybe let another transformer drown in the tar. Just checked one of my QIIs and a 100W Antek lying around and it might be a drop in....

Last edited by revintage; 20th February 2011 at 02:36 PM.
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Old 20th February 2011, 05:22 PM   #5
M Gregg is offline M Gregg  United Kingdom
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Just for interest,

Have you thought about connecting the two primaries in series?

If the power Tx's are the same then you have 110V + 110V. You could make a connection box and plug the two amps into that with a 220V input.

Just a thought!

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M. Gregg
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Last edited by M Gregg; 20th February 2011 at 05:24 PM.
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Old 20th February 2011, 05:29 PM   #6
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Great idea M.!
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Old 20th February 2011, 05:45 PM   #7
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Very inventive! Literally 'thinking outside the box'.
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Old 20th February 2011, 06:12 PM   #8
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If you wish to series tie your transformers, you need to make sure they are "identical" or else the voltages may not distribute equally between the two. This by itself may not be harmful, but the imbalance may lead to blown components in the one with the higher voltage and reduced power in the lower voltage one.
Just a thought.
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Old 20th February 2011, 06:33 PM   #9
jjman is offline jjman  United States
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Is either leg of the 220 (230 ?) in Sweden referenced to ground? Does either amp utilize a reference to any type of "ground" at the power cord? Are these relevant to the series power-connection solution?
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Old 20th February 2011, 06:56 PM   #10
M Gregg is offline M Gregg  United Kingdom
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Things to consider are:

I do not know how the mains are configured in your country

Do the mains have the return at Ground potential if it does-

The amp chassis should be grounded.

The impedance of each primary needs to be the same. Easy way to check is remove HT rectifier and check centre of power Tx’s primaries to see if voltage is approx half of supply. Then check heater supply voltage.

It would probably be a good idea to use one power switch on the live side of supply (on one amp), this would mean that the switch on one amp would power the two via series connection. You only want to switch the live side of supply not the return!

The amp without the switch would be connected to the return side of supply.

Just a few thoughts you may have better ideas!

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M. Gregg
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