diyAudio

diyAudio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/)
-   Tubes / Valves (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubes-valves/)
-   -   learning tube rectified psu (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubes-valves/129516-learning-tube-rectified-psu.html)

milen007 10th September 2008 07:34 AM

learning tube rectified psu
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hi guys,

i want to learn about how to build psu using tube rectifier. particulary 5AR4 as this drop the least voltage.

can you please guide me to the link or information on the schematic or wiring diagram of tube rectified psu full wave? how to wire the pins?

how to wire the filament using the 5v? from my research this 5ar4 is claimed to be half indirect heated? whats that mean? how to wire it?

i played around with duncan psud II and here is roughly what i can come up with. but still need advice on wiring.

some advice on which tube rectifier to experiment that can give me more option to use different kind of tubes is really appriciated

thanks in advance,
Erwin

sarrisk 10th September 2008 07:48 AM

take a look here http://sarris.info/main/tube-power-supply

regards
costas

milen007 10th September 2008 08:16 AM

Thx sarrisk. thats quick.

i got questions:
1. can i try this setup on the 18v tranformer that can power my diy DAC? it need around 18v to 24v. as a replacement of solid state rectifiers bridge?
2. is choke only being use for tube rectifer or any psu setup with solid state rectifier? why most diagram i saw is only CRC in ss psu? cost factor?
3. the link is for 5U4, is this the same wiring for 5AR4?

sorry bout newbie questions. thanks a lot for the help

milen007 10th September 2008 08:28 AM

2 Attachment(s)
referencing:
http://www.mif.pg.gda.pl/homepages/f...093/5/5AR4.pdf

is my pin wiring picture below taken from sarris.info is correct? thx

Stixx 10th September 2008 09:25 AM

Quote:

is my pin wiring picture below taken from sarris.info is correct
Yes, except that you have interrupted the lead going from the heater to pin 2...

sarrisk 10th September 2008 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by milen007
Thx sarrisk. thats quick.

i got questions:
1. can i try this setup on the 18v tranformer that can power my diy DAC? it need around 18v to 24v. as a replacement of solid state rectifiers bridge?
2. is choke only being use for tube rectifer or any psu setup with solid state rectifier? why most diagram i saw is only CRC in ss psu? cost factor?
3. the link is for 5U4, is this the same wiring for 5AR4?

sorry bout newbie questions. thanks a lot for the help

hmmm... ok
You need something little bit different.. Ok be patient to draw something exactly for your needs, and to post it here.

regards
costas

kevinkr 10th September 2008 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by milen007
Thx sarrisk. thats quick.

i got questions:
1. can i try this setup on the 18v tranformer that can power my diy DAC? it need around 18v to 24v. as a replacement of solid state rectifiers bridge?
2. is choke only being use for tube rectifer or any psu setup with solid state rectifier? why most diagram i saw is only CRC in ss psu? cost factor?
3. the link is for 5U4, is this the same wiring for 5AR4?

sorry bout newbie questions. thanks a lot for the help


You're not planning on using the 5AR4 to rectify 18V are you? Tube rectifiers are not a suitable choice for very low voltage high current supplies used in most solid state designs although I have heard of a few people attempting to do this with varying degrees of success.

Tube rectifiers all have much higher voltage drops at a given current than a solid state rectifier and generally much lower peak current and continuous current ratings as well. A 5AR4 has a maximum current rating of around 250mA and will drop at least 20V - 25V at this current level.

Hopefully I have misunderstood you.

whitelabrat 10th September 2008 06:55 PM

As kevinkr suggested, a 5AR4 may not be a suitable for rectifying a low voltage such as 18v. The transformer required for the 5AR4 would likely dwarf the 18V. I would think that a 6AL5 would be more suitable for the job.

milen007 10th September 2008 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by sarrisk


hmmm... ok
You need something little bit different.. Ok be patient to draw something exactly for your needs, and to post it here.

regards
costas

Hi Costas

Thanks for doing that, would love it. thx in adv

Quote:

Originally posted by kevinkr



You're not planning on using the 5AR4 to rectify 18V are you? Tube rectifiers are not a suitable choice for very low voltage high current supplies used in most solid state designs although I have heard of a few people attempting to do this with varying degrees of success.

Tube rectifiers all have much higher voltage drops at a given current than a solid state rectifier and generally much lower peak current and continuous current ratings as well. A 5AR4 has a maximum current rating of around 250mA and will drop at least 20V - 25V at this current level.

Hopefully I have misunderstood you.

Hi kevinkr

this is more for learning experience, as i have the transformer and most of the thing. i give it a shot at 18vac for my dac as it only draw
150mA and its input dc voltage is very forgiving. as it can take 18v to 24v and even 36v.

or maybe i should try hybrid? enlightenment pls

5ar4 only has max of 250mA? though psud II stated that the IFRM is 0.75A. :confused:

how bout 6au4 or 6dw4? do they give out 1A?

milen007 10th September 2008 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by whitelabrat
As kevinkr suggested, a 5AR4 may not be a suitable for rectifying a low voltage such as 18v. The transformer required for the 5AR4 would likely dwarf the 18V. I would think that a 6AL5 would be more suitable for the job.
Hi whitelabrat
sorry for newbie question, just a quick search but cant find the spec for 6AL5. just found that its a 7pin tube and was used by Radio/TV-reception. no PIV value found. is it half or full wave? mind sharing how it can do the job you suggested? thx in adv


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:25 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2