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Old 30th July 2007, 11:31 AM   #101
TerryO is offline TerryO  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by EC8010
MJL21193: Time to fix that typo in your sign-off line...

Yes indeed!

It should read: "with yore fingers." This indicates that in the distant past your fingers existed and, it may be assumed from the previous information given, that they were in a different state than they will have been presently. This latest change in English usage literally kills two bird with one's stone and saves time as well. I believe it should be referred to as "Double Talk."
Of course, ye're allowed to refer to it in any manner you may have choiced.

Best Regards,
TerryO
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Old 30th July 2007, 11:48 AM   #102
OzMikeH is offline OzMikeH  Australia
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Has anyone else noticed the subtle little joke in the title yet?

I may be wrong but I think "Spelling, capitalization, and grammar." should not have the second comma.

Perhaps it should be "Spelling, capitalization, punctuation and grammar."
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Old 30th July 2007, 12:14 PM   #103
7N7 is offline 7N7  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally posted by OzMikeH
Has anyone else noticed the subtle little joke in the title yet?

I may be wrong but I think "Spelling, capitalization, and grammar." should not have the second comma.

Perhaps it should be "Spelling, capitalization, punctuation and grammar."

We've done that one!

7N7
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Old 30th July 2007, 12:42 PM   #104
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I don't think we've really "done" the Oxford comma yet. In the examples I found by Googling it only seems to be of use in sentences with lots of "ands" where there is a possibility of ambiguity. There is no real ambiguity in EC8010's title so I feel the last comma is redundant. As to American prose style being superior to current UK usage, I think that's very much a matter of taste. There are some Americans who would be more "English" than the "English" and thus adopt a very old-fashioned style, or lard their prose with Latin or French tags (quite often, like HP in "The Absolute Sound" magazine, getting them wrong). It's a bit like wearing a three-piece woollen suit in a heat-wave.
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Old 30th July 2007, 05:48 PM   #105
Arx is offline Arx  Canada
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I always use the oxford comma. It makes things much clearer to read, and using it in all cases removes the need to have yet another special case where you have to do things differently to avoid ambiguity.

Pork and beans, steak and potatoes, and bacon and eggs is a good example of the oxford comma reducing ambiguity.

I suppose you could bastardize it all with some brackets or something, but really don't need to if you just use the comma.

-Nick
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Old 30th July 2007, 07:05 PM   #106
Aengus is offline Aengus  Canada
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Arx said:

Quote:
I always use the oxford comma. It makes things much clearer to read, and using it in all cases removes the need to have yet another special case where you have to do things differently to avoid ambiguity.
I too. If it is used only intermittently and a potentially ambiguous instance omits it, the reader doesn't know whether the omission was deliberate or accidental; and so cannot resolve the ambiguity.

Regards.

Aengus
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Old 30th July 2007, 10:35 PM   #107
7N7 is offline 7N7  United Kingdom
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Just like the Oxford comma, I like to use hyphens far more than is fashionable. These too can remove ambiguity.

I especially like them in compound adjectives e.g. "A fast-moving story"

7N7
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Old 30th July 2007, 10:46 PM   #108
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Quote:
Originally posted by EC8010
MJL21193: Time to fix that typo in your sign-off line...

There. Happy now?
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Old 31st July 2007, 01:41 AM   #109
BHD is offline BHD  United States
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I love the internet, but I hate what it's done to the English language.

One of the reasons I like this site more than any other of its kind is that there seems to be a higher standard here at diyAudio.com in both behavior and in what people post, so I don't see anything wrong with a higher standard in how they post it. I check everything I write before I hit the "submit reply" button. I don't think it's wrong to ask that people do this any moreso than asking someone to do a search before they ask a question. It's a simple matter of courtesy.

I for one can't stand reading garbage misspellings like "websight" and words that have been misspelled or misused because of spell checking so many times on the internet that they've wormed their way into popular usage, such as the interchange of words like "lose" and "loose". Sentences like "He's got nothing left to loose." are, to me, like hitting a speed bump at fifty miles an hour. Don't even get me started on using characters and numerals place of words. I simply ignore those posts.

A terrible result of all this is that it's infecting foreign people's use of English. I've had people from other countries use "U" for you and "4" in place of "for" in business correspondence! Granted, these were e-mails, but it just amazed me as this was honest to goodness business correspondence! I feel bad enough that English is insinuating itself into other culture's languages like a virus, but affecting others with our bad habits with our own language is really sad.

Another thing that amazes me in my business life and on the internet are high level professionals, people like doctors, lawyers and executives who couldn't put a decent sentence together to save their souls. I'm 40 and all I have is a high school education, but I'm relatively well spoken and well read. When I mention my education level to people I meet they're usually suprised. When they ask where I learned this or that I say three words:

"I read books."

Despite my lack of education I've managed to get a decent technically oriented job with a major company. One of the main reasons I was able to do this were my decent written and spoken communication skills.

But all is forgiven for those out there where English isn't their first language. I've taught myself some German and Russian, but I wouldn't dare post on a German or Russian audio board. My hat's off to anyone that takes that plunge.
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Old 31st July 2007, 02:49 AM   #110
jlsem is offline jlsem  United States
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Quote:
I love the internet, but I hate what it's done to the English language.
The internet has done nothing to the English language per se, but it HAS exposed a disappointing level of semi-literacy among the general population. Fortunately, for the most part, semi-literacy usually means semi-intelligence and makes for a handy junk filter - specially on audio forums.

John
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