top plate - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Commercial Sector > Vendor Forums > Tubelab

Tubelab Discussion and support of Tubelab products, prototypes and experiments

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 29th January 2013, 12:44 PM   #1
rock12 is offline rock12  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: midland mi
Default top plate

I ordered 1/8 aluminum top plate for my sse. I hope this will hold the large edcors and choke. Never having worked much metal I will listen to any advise. I read somewhere that wood drill bits work. Does this also count for holes +_1" Size wise 12X16 seems good. I have a drill press,band saw,tablesaw and routertable. Metal looks tough
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th January 2013, 01:30 PM   #2
rknize is offline rknize  United States
diyAudio Member
 
rknize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Chicagoland
Send a message via AIM to rknize Send a message via Yahoo to rknize
You will probably get some flex towards the center. I beefed up mine by adding a "beam" made from aluminum 90^ angle stock from the hardware store. Aluminum cuts fairly well with wood tools, though metal tools are better. With plenty of oil, large holes can be cut slowly on the drill press using hole saws or even flat wood bits (though they will wear quickly).
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th January 2013, 02:22 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Quote:
Originally Posted by rock12 View Post
I ordered 1/8 aluminum top plate for my sse. I hope this will hold the large edcors and choke. Never having worked much metal I will listen to any advise. I read somewhere that wood drill bits work. Does this also count for holes +_1" Size wise 12X16 seems good. I have a drill press,band saw,tablesaw and routertable. Metal looks tough

With a drill press you're halfway there, get some step drill bits like these

3 X HSS Steel High Speed Step Drill Bits 4-32mm 4-20mm 4-12mm | eBay

These can drill holes from 1/4 inch to 1-3/8 inch diameter. Mark where
you holes should be on the plate, use a punch to make an indentation
precisely at the center of these holes, clamp your plate on the drill press
and drill the required size of hole.

Google 'step drill bit' for lots more information.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th January 2013, 02:46 PM   #4
rknize is offline rknize  United States
diyAudio Member
 
rknize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Chicagoland
Send a message via AIM to rknize Send a message via Yahoo to rknize
Step bits are nice, but they only go so big. A cheap hole saw set with oil and a drill press on its slowest speed go a long way. That is how I drilled all these large holes on my SSE:

Click the image to open in full size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th January 2013, 04:03 PM   #5
rock12 is offline rock12  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: midland mi
Thanks . Its out to the garage to test.. super warm for Mi.
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2013, 10:07 AM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
BillEpstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: The Great Smoky Mountains
I'd just add that it helps to drill an 1/8" hole after marking with an awl or punch, then using the step bit or hole saw to keep the step bit from wandering. Most drill presses, mine included, have a lot of run-out, i.e., the bit tip rotates in a wider circle than it's actual size.

Also, don't skimp on hole saws. The one piece cheapos at home centers will not last through more than a couple of wood-borings, let alone metal. The branded, separate arbor and bit ones, Rigid or Cobalt or Milwaukee, etc., do hold up over time.

This 12x17x1/8" aluminum top plate holds this one great big Hammond with no flex

Whenever I cut aluminum on my table saw, I use an 80 tooth carbide blade with the metal double-faced taped to a piece of plywood. Lowes sells a blue-colored backing tape in the paint section that even sticks parts well enough for using a router. You could also hold the metal to the plywood with a toggle clamp or two. Using the plywood keeps the metal from diving under the fence or flying up off the blade or kicking back. All three of those conditions will result in loss of blood and body parts!

One more thing...after 10 years and many holes drilled, the pilot bit in the arbor may break with resulting catastrophic damage to your workpiece. These pilot bits appear to be cheap "pot metal" and I've now replaced them with good HSS bits.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 45 Amp3.jpg (964.6 KB, 87 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_2841_1.JPG (121.4 KB, 87 views)
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone have a diagram of the Linn top plate? adhoc Analogue Source 25 1st January 2012 01:09 AM
Carbon top plate for LP12 ChristianThomas Analogue Source 1 9th May 2010 02:53 PM
Modifying speaker stand top plate loop7 Construction Tips 3 13th February 2010 06:51 PM
Turntable aggresive sound, top plate? iain Analogue Source 10 31st May 2007 04:03 PM
1/8" Aluminum for top plate? Sherman Tubes / Valves 23 10th January 2005 03:04 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:58 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2