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Old 21st February 2009, 12:17 AM   #41
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Here's a dumb question: Why is most of the tall stuff (capacitors, etc.) mounted on the bottom side of the board, as if you were going to do an "under chassis" mount? You've gone and put the Phoenix blocks on top, which is going to make an under-chassis mount difficult if not impossible.
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Old 21st February 2009, 12:59 AM   #42
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It was an accident.



I figure I can still get by. There not any taller than the tube sockets. I'll just have to wire it up before I mount the board..





Nikolas
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Old 21st February 2009, 03:04 AM   #43
chrish is offline chrish  Australia
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If it worth doing, it is worth doing right. The screw terminals look taller than the shoulder of the tube sockets. Wiring up before mounting is going to result in using longer wire runs that may lead to interference etc. Also, I think it is best to mount the large cathode resistors on the back of the board as well. Take the time now to do it right and you will not regret it...
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Old 21st February 2009, 04:32 AM   #44
pchw is offline pchw  United States
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Guess what I did last night.
Desoldered all the parts that were soldered on the top by previous owner.
Chris's advise is a good one.
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Old 21st February 2009, 06:31 AM   #45
pchw is offline pchw  United States
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One more thing, if you may try out other tubes such as EL34's and 6L6GC, I suggest you to use 2 cathode resistors in series (200R + 560R), both 5W or above. Put the 560R close to the socket. When use KT88's, just solder a wire to short the 200R. When use EL34, remove the wire or add another resistor to parallel the 200R to adjust to anything between 560R and 760R. I think Chris has done something similar to this as well.
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Old 21st February 2009, 01:12 PM   #46
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Well.... Looks like I have some deslodering to do. The only thing is. I have never done it before.

What do I do? Do I heat the solder up and then suck it up with a eye dropper or something like?



Nick
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Old 21st February 2009, 01:37 PM   #47
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I use these tools: desoldering bulb and desoldering braid

There are nicer tools out there, but these are cheap and work. Find an old junk circuit board somewhere and practice on a couple parts first. Heat up the solder with your iron and suck up as much as you can with the bulb. You can also use the braid to soak up some of the solder. The two pin blocks should be relatively easy. The three pin will be a little trickier, but not impossible. Try not to overheat the board or the Phoenix block. Oh, you'll also want a small flat screwdriver and a pair of needlenose pliers to gently pry and/or pull the parts off the board once the solder is removed.
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Old 21st February 2009, 02:02 PM   #48
rkevans is offline rkevans  United States
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Buy some desoldering braid. Radio Shack carries it if you're desperate enough.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...44&tab=summary

One hint: It comes off the spool very 'compressed' and works better if you loosen it up a little bit. Just grab the braid at two points about a inch apart and bring your fingers together. That will spread the braid a little bit. Another hint is that the braid is usually bone dry and works better with just a hint of paste flux on it.

Put the braid on top of the soldered connection, apply heat with your soldering iron. When the solder melts, it'll get sucked into the braid. The braid has a limited capacity to absorb solder, so it's not uncommon to use a few sections (1/4" apart) to get all the solder off. Be careful not to overheat the board -- and this stuff gets HOT quickly, so don't burn your fingertips by holding it too close to the connection.

Use the RS stuff for now, but add a small roll of better quality (anything but RS) braid to your next electronics parts order.

Rick
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Old 21st February 2009, 02:35 PM   #49
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Some braid has rosin so it wicks a little better than the plain stuff since it has built-in flux. You can also put a little liquid flux on the braid to help speed things up if you have never de-soldered before.

Since nobody has mentioned it yet, you need to be careful that you do not lift any solder pads when you are de-soldering. It's fairly easy to solder the braid to the pad when de-soldering and pulling on it can easily pull the pad off. Trying to wiggle the component off before you have completely de-soldered it is another easy way to lift the pads. Tinning your tip well before touching it to the braid gets the heat transfer going and lets the braid wick the solder. You want to get on the joint and off the joint fairly quickly or you risk overheating the components (same as when soldering the components to the PCB). Keep your tip tinned and wipe it often on the sponge. As mentioned above, move to a fresh section of the braid once the previous section is fully wicked.
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Old 21st February 2009, 03:20 PM   #50
wicked1 is offline wicked1  United States
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I personally like these.. Vacuum Solder Sucker
You sort of **** it, then when you're ready to suck the solder away, you just press a button. Tho, while I've linked to one at radioshack, I've had two of those break on me. A really cheap one from an online surplus store has lasted me years and years.

And another thing is that the solder cools off FAST. So, if you're using a bulb or one of these suckers, you need to get it on the hot solder as soon as the iron is off of it. You can't even wait long enough to set the iron down or anything. Just in one motion move the tip of the soldering iron off the pad, and the sucker on the pad w/in a fraction of a second.

I have better luck w/ these than I do the braid. I usually don't even have to do any final cleanup w/ a braid. The vacuum tool gets it all.
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