diyAudio

diyAudio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/)
-   Tubelab (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubelab/)
-   -   Kaidee's Simple SE Build Thread (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubelab/135110-kaidees-simple-se-build-thread.html)

nukaidee 19th December 2008 02:30 AM

Kaidee's Simple SE Build Thread
 
Just thought I'd start a build thread if anyone is interested. You Gurus may also be able to spot stupid problems with my pictures probably. =)
If this type of thread is prohibited please lock and delete.

Dec 18.

All parts have arrived from Digikey. Tubes are here already. Sovtek KT-88's Chinese 12AT7 and 5AR4's. (Yes, I'm on a budget). All tube sockets are ceramic and gold plated.

Power transformer is the Allied 6K7VG
OPT's are Hammonds 125-CSE
Both are on order

gold plated binding posts, ac plug with "line filter", and hopefully neutrik RCA jacks are comming in soon.

There is no planned choke or supplemental power capacitor. Also no pot, no FRED's, and no enclosure so far.

The amp will be powering 2 Dahlquist 8Ohm bookshelf speakers, 6 inch woofer with 1 inch tweeters.

Pretty busy so far, but I hope to start soldering by tomorrow. Pics will start when the project starts =)

Total cost so far (CND)? 268 paid and expecting another 150 for the transformers. broke already =(

Question for the pros -- what would happen if I used the R1 resistor to limit noise and then also added a choke later without desoldering it?

Ty_Bower 19th December 2008 11:52 AM

I see lots of gold plated parts in your list. I've been told that it is best to scrape or sand the plating off the part where you make a solder connection. Otherwise the solder will stick great to the gold plating, but five years later the plating will 'peel' off the part and you'll get a lousy connection.

If you opt to use R1 instead of a choke, you'll have more 120Hz ripple on the B+ supply. You may hear a faint hum from the speakers if they are efficient ones. Given the description of your speakers and their "bookshelf" nature, I'd be tempted to try it without the choke and see if it is a problem. If you choose to add a choke later, you need to snip out R1 or you won't get the benefit of the choke.

nukaidee 19th December 2008 04:19 PM

Hey Thanks for the Reply,

The gold plated is the female side of the socket, the end that connects to the PCB isn't plated =)
And the news regarding the choke is a good news. saves me $$$. I'll remember to post results when I finally get it built. If there is hum it should be evident since I dont have pots right?

Ty_Bower 19th December 2008 05:36 PM

I assume you've already ordered and received your power transformer from Allied. If not, the C-14X is a recommended choke for the Simple SE and costs a little over fifteen dollars. The C-24X is even cheaper; just under eight dollars. George used a C-24X in his "industrial" amplifier. I believe even a small filter choke is better than none at all.

Of course, if you have the resistor it doesn't hurt to try it and see if it works for you. You can always add the choke later.

whitelabrat 19th December 2008 07:13 PM

Quote:

no enclosure so far.
With voltages around 450vdc, you or some other curious fingers could get seriously hurt. Try dumpster diving for a broken integrated reciever and gut it for it's chassis. A cake pan may also be used. Be sure it doesn't have any cake in it though. ;)

I would guess cutting holes would be a challenge though without the right tools.

tubelab.com 20th December 2008 01:49 AM

Quote:

George used a C-24X in his "industrial" amplifier. I believe even a small filter choke is better than none at all.
Yes, even the $6 choke is measurably better than a resistor, but I can hear no difference on my 87db Yamaha monitor speakers which are a bit weak in the bass response. I can hear the difference on my big 96db speakers. The choke can always be added later if hum turns out to be a problem.

Quote:

I would guess cutting holes would be a challenge though without the right tools.
The cheap punch set from Harbor Freight works good, but the hole sizes are not optimum. Thin material like a cake pan can often be drilled using a cheap spade bit set, or even a hole saw. You need to clamp a sacrificial piece of wood to the back of the metal to avoid tearing the metal. I have even used the drill a few 3/8 inch holes and file or Dremel to fit method. It works good if you have a large supply of patience. Unfortonately, I don't.

Quote:

With voltages around 450vdc, you or some other curious fingers could get seriously hurt.
I agree that some type of enclosure is needed to protect users, friends, and pets from 450 volts. Death is permanent and very possible. Ultra low tech and cheap, mount it all on a piece of wood and put a cage over it. I have used the stainless steel mesh trash cans or DVD cases from Target or Walmart. The cage MUST be grounded to the green wire on the power cord.

nukaidee 20th December 2008 05:55 AM

haha I guess I made a little confusion.

I don't have a case bought yet, but I definitely will have an enclosure of some sort. I was thinking a clear lexan or acrylic. if not it will probably sit in a tupperware box with the tubes sticking out =)

jrn77478 20th December 2008 03:27 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by whitelabrat

I would guess cutting holes would be a challenge though without the right tools.

The right tool makes any job easier. :)

The "step" drills at harbor freight make nice holes in any material thinner than the depth of the steps. The were just the ticket for drilling the larger holes in the sheet of 1/8" T6 I'm using for my Simple SE chassis. I used my cheap-o Chinese drill press for most of them, but a steady hand and a low speed on a hand-held drill were just fine for the rest.

Ty_Bower 20th December 2008 03:53 PM

I'm a big fan of the Harbor Fright step drills, especially if you are drilling aluminum. They make nice smooth holes, even in 3mm thick stuff. I've been told that a "good" chassis punch is even better, but good chassis punches cost good money.

I bought the three piece step drill set, but it only goes up to 1/2". I'd recommend going for the two piece set that makes holes as big as 1-3/8".

A cheap press stand helps a lot, too.
http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i4...h_P1080312.jpg

nukaidee 20th December 2008 05:14 PM

I definitely don't have that much stuff, I usually do a pilot hole with either a smaller hand drill or a dremel then I use a larger spade drill bit or even a lock-hole bit and finish it off. then sand sand sand!


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:52 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2