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Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli
Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli
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Old 3rd May 2018, 04:39 PM   #11
tsmith1315 is offline tsmith1315  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pano View Post
There seems to be a large range in the general population.

The bell mentioned in the OP would drive them mad. I don't know why the difference.
And that's why its called Autism Spectrum Disorder. The spectrum is very wide. I've run across many people in my area of rural south Georgia who have it, and fortunately most that I've run across are similar and on the higher end of the spectrum. I can see mild traits in myself that make me wonder if everyone has some degree of it, or more precisely, if it's just a normal neurological process that is intensely magnified in these individuals.

I think part of the issue (with the bell, for example) is focus. When they zero in on something, good or bad, it's all they can think about. If the bell annoyed me, I'd just try to ignore it. Someone on the spectrum wouldn't be able to ignore it, and may literally zone in on that one stimulation. The result could be anything from turning the music off to an hours-long total meltdown.

These traits have become both frustrating and very endearing over the years. I have always appreciated people that are true individuals, and when I meet someone with autism, I smile and enjoy them because they are truly their own selves.


from the OP:
Quote:
Originally Posted by spaceistheplace View Post
In this way a microphone capturing a frequency response from a loudspeaker in a room would not accurately measure the experience of that frequency response from the listener.
Exactly, except IMHO, it may be less of a general frequency range issue and more a problem of certain attributes of a sound. Perhaps the initial strike of the bell at such a high frequency. The tone of the bell might be pleasant if it weren't for the spike when the clapper strikes the bell.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 07:31 PM   #12
spaceistheplace is offline spaceistheplace
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Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli
Default Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli

Agreed it’s not as simple as freq. response. I don’t have a background in the field so I’m attempting to be conceptual / general.

We listened to the same thing and yet did not. The differences were clearly dramatic.

‘Given competent design, things should sound much the same’ assumes all listeners experience of sound is the same.

This is a huge flawed assumption in my mind.

There is more at work.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 07:47 PM   #13
MarcelvdG is offline MarcelvdG  Netherlands
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Originally Posted by spaceistheplace View Post
Thanks for the insights.

I’m curious if there’s there’s a higher autistic spectrum density in the field of audio engineering or in the audio hobby.
Of course there is, just like in any other field of engineering/technical or scientific hobbies. By the way, I don't know if you ever read this humoristic text about engineers Gav's World : Engineers Explained , but it's a pretty accurate description of Asperger's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spaceistheplace View Post
Did you by chance review any of the studies I posted?
I didn't, I only had a few minute's time to reply before going to work.

This is an interesting psychological test when you want to know how autistic you are:

Autism Spectrum Quotient

It doesn't count as a diagnosis, of course, but it gives a pretty good indication anyway.

Last edited by MarcelvdG; 3rd May 2018 at 07:53 PM.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 07:51 PM   #14
spaceistheplace is offline spaceistheplace
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Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsmith1315 View Post
It's as if he doesn't hear or smell on the same logarithmic scale as we do.

This is the crux of what I’m driving at.

Clarity at low volumes is essential. Going past 9 or so on the knob is an anomaly.

The way you describe your son is quite similar to the individual I was with. I’m glad he has found areas in which he excels and feels satisfied by.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 08:19 PM   #15
spaceistheplace is offline spaceistheplace
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Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcelvdG View Post
Of course there is, just like in any other field of engineering/technical or scientific hobbies. By the way, I don't know if you ever read this humoristic text about engineers Gav's World : Engineers Explained , but it's a pretty accurate description.

I will give it a read now. Thanks.

Given this, wouldn’t it be sensible to operate under the assumption that some here might be not lovers of “distortion” or “poor engineering” but rather making an attempt to reengineer sound to suit their unique brain chemistry? In other words, make it “feel correct” for them. Of course, in practice I’m sure susceptible to misguidance, misinformation, snake oil and so on, but nonetheless the intention is valid.

To me this sounds like a practice of self-healing; finding ways to enjoy music despite a very different experience of it than the average human being, however unclear cognitively that may be for the practitioner.

Perhaps (just as an example so don’t take too literally), there might be a higher prevalence of SET / high sensitivity full range usage amongst those on the autistic spectrum.

Someone mentioned Earl Geddes sometimes pops into the forum. Does someone have contact details for him? It would be interesting to hear his or another experts view on the topic.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 08:24 PM   #16
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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Earl is gedlee here
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Old 3rd May 2018, 08:43 PM   #17
spaceistheplace is offline spaceistheplace
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Autism and Responses to Auditory Stimuli
Thanks I’ve reached out to him.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 09:25 PM   #18
Ultima Thule is offline Ultima Thule  Europe
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I would be curious how people somewhere within the autistic spectrum perceives different types of musical instruments, for example as I mentioned in another Lounge thread I don't find the Chinese Sheng instrument pleasing to my ears, whether I am autistic I really don't know.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 09:32 PM   #19
phase is offline phase  United States
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There likely have always been individuals who have the traits. As Temple Grandin said, picture a tribe of people and there was a discovery/creation of say, an arrow head. Do you think it was the leader, who was speaking of it, or maybe instead, the quiet guy who is always working on something?

Fascinating area that hits close to home I’m afraid.
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Old 3rd May 2018, 10:31 PM   #20
MarcelvdG is offline MarcelvdG  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultima Thule View Post
I would be curious how people somewhere within the autistic spectrum perceives different types of musical instruments, for example as I mentioned in another Lounge thread I don't find the Chinese Sheng instrument pleasing to my ears, whether I am autistic I really don't know.
Everyone has autistic and neurotypical traits, do you give a damn whether your autistic traits exceed the threshold the shrinks agreed to in their latest psychiatric manual?

If you do or if you are just curious, have you tried the autism quotient test?
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