Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

The Lounge A place to talk about almost anything but politics and religion.

John Curl's Blowtorch preamplifier part II
John Curl's Blowtorch preamplifier part II
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20th August 2013, 03:34 PM   #42511
Kindhornman is offline Kindhornman  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Kindhornman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Angeles, California
Simon,
Does the anodizing type play into the radiation properties here, soft vs hard, or is it just the black body principal that covers the radiation properties of an anodized surface.
 
Old 20th August 2013, 03:40 PM   #42512
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oakmont PA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kindhornman View Post
Simon,
Does the anodizing type play into the radiation properties here, soft vs hard, or is it just the black body principal that covers the radiation properties of an anodized surface.
Soft anodizing usually uses a dye to get the color. Hard is a natural black-ish color depending on alloy. So for cosmetic use soft is better. There will be slight difference in radiation properties, but as the hard color depends on alloy predicting it is not practical.
 
Old 20th August 2013, 03:49 PM   #42513
Kindhornman is offline Kindhornman  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Kindhornman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Angeles, California
Thank you Ed. So it is just a visual preference at this point. I understand that the soft anodizing probably looks flatter in appearance than the hard which I would think would look more shinny. But off subject so need to answer anymore on this.

Thanks again,
Steven
 
Old 20th August 2013, 03:55 PM   #42514
hitsware is offline hitsware
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
> The other reason to anodize is that it looks good.

Also makes the surface non-conductive.
 
Old 20th August 2013, 04:56 PM   #42515
scott wurcer is offline scott wurcer  United States
diyAudio Member
 
scott wurcer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: dorchester ma
Quote:
Originally Posted by simon7000 View Post
Let us look at the costs! One square inch of .125" aluminum costs me about $.04. The cost to anodize it black is around $.02. So for heatsinks running under about 50 C the advantage is clear. For those running above that the advantage goes to a fan. But if a fan is not acceptable for either noise or MTBF then the advantage goes dark.
I surrendered a long time ago, but you have not demonstrated the difference with big multi-fin heatsinks (they don't radiate through eachother) and reasonable natural convection (which also rises with temperature). But please we can can drop it.

BTW on your Bybee measurements, IMHO you still have no solid technical basis to make a statement like "they treat complex signals and regular ones differently".
__________________
"The question of who is right and who is wrong has seemed to me always too small to be worth a moment's thought, while the question of what is right and what is wrong has seemed all-important."
 
Old 20th August 2013, 05:06 PM   #42516
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oakmont PA
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott wurcer View Post
I surrendered a long time ago, but you have not demonstrated the difference with big multi-fin heatsinks (they don't radiate through eachother) and reasonable natural convection (which also rises with temperature). But please we can can drop it.

BTW on your Bybee measurements, IMHO you still have no solid technical basis to make a statement like "they treat complex signals and regular ones differently".
I thought we were in agreement, it makes no economic sense to anodize heatsinks except in special cases.

I hesitate to show more Bybee measurements due to the amazing amount of heat that creates. But from unshown data that is my "Feel". You of course are entitled to your own opinion.

My intent on measuring the Bybees was to demonstrate that with careful (or some may consider ludicrous) measurements you should be able to distinguish between a Bybee and a resistor. Of course I also expect to be able to distinguish between resistors even of the same type.

I find that the Bybees do perform differently than a resistor of the same value and approximate inductance more than can be explained by RLC measurements.

Now I can make simple devices that also deviate from RLC measurements. That actually is a "Lab" that is given to freshmen. Again you are welcome to your own opinion.

ES
 
Old 20th August 2013, 05:18 PM   #42517
SY is offline SY  United States
On Hiatus
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
John Curl's Blowtorch preamplifier part II
Quote:
Originally Posted by simon7000 View Post
I find that the Bybees do perform differently than a resistor of the same value and approximate inductance more than can be explained by RLC measurements.
Putting aside actual measurement capability for inductance (several of the measurement gurus seemed skeptical), are they different than your R&R or between several different types of plain vanilla resistors of the same value? I asked that before and you told me that you only had one kind. Since 30m-ohm resistors are cheap, I'd certainly pony up to buy you 4 or 5 different kinds if you'll agree to do the same measurements the same way.

It's interesting that you have stated that the "Bybee effect" doesn't seem to work for sine waves, but your example measurements seemed to be sine waves. Could you enlighten me, please?

Quote:
Now I can make simple devices that also deviate from RLC measurements.
Yes, a 1N4007 would serve nicely. It doesn't even follow Ohm's Law!
__________________
"You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is."
 
Old 20th August 2013, 05:54 PM   #42518
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oakmont PA
Quote:
Originally Posted by SY View Post
Putting aside actual measurement capability for inductance (several of the measurement gurus seemed skeptical), are they different than your R&R or between several different types of plain vanilla resistors of the same value? I asked that before and you told me that you only had one kind. Since 30m-ohm resistors are cheap, I'd certainly pony up to buy you 4 or 5 different kinds if you'll agree to do the same measurements the same way.

It's interesting that you have stated that the "Bybee effect" doesn't seem to work for sine waves, but your example measurements seemed to be sine waves. Could you enlighten me, please?



Yes, a 1N4007 would serve nicely. It doesn't even follow Ohm's Law!
I did get in a bunch of other resistors. They all behave pretty much so the same. The level of the loss from a sine wave is the same for resistors and the Bybee. The loss for "Noise" is greater.

Yes a diode is one of the non RLC components. What results do you think you would see from a wirewound resistor immersed in "iron filings?"
 
Old 20th August 2013, 06:06 PM   #42519
SY is offline SY  United States
On Hiatus
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
John Curl's Blowtorch preamplifier part II
Higher inductance.
__________________
"You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is."
 
Old 20th August 2013, 06:08 PM   #42520
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oakmont PA
Quote:
Originally Posted by SY View Post
Higher inductance.
At low frequency the particles will move as the frequency goes up there is less movement. How would that show up?
 

Closed Thread


John Curl's Blowtorch preamplifier part IIHide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:33 AM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 14.29%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2018 diyAudio
Wiki