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Old 13th August 2006, 08:54 PM   #11
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Default More Pics ...

Back to the pics!


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Gluing the bottom panel to the back panel.
Here the back panel with amp housing is lying on it's back, with the panel that is to become the bottom of the sub facing to the right of the camera. The only glue is between these two panel edges, and the amp H-brace and the interior of the bottom panel. I dry fit the remaining panels in the glue-up as support to ensure they go together properly as the glue-up progresses.


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So far, so good...
Tight miter joints make me happy! It's more work to do the glue up in stages this way, but I have much more control over the process. It's looking good...


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Gluing the top panel to the back panel.
I've taken it apart and glued the top panel to the back panel, in the same way as the bottom panel. In this picture, the top panel is facing straight to the left, and the back panel is still lying on the ground.


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The Box of Pain takes shape
With 15 cabinet clamps and two band clamps, this thing is under a great deal of pressure. Here I've glued the side facing the left of the camera on three edges against the top, back, and bottom sides of the sub. This was stressing me out at the start, but ended up being easier than I thought. I should mention that I didn't really have to close the clamps with very much pressure to get it to go together nicely. But I needed every one of these clamps to ensure the box went together right, and one of the other sides didn't go out of whack.


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The other side is on...
Here I've glued on the right panel the same way as the left panel in the last picture. You can see the glue squeeze-out on both sides and along the bottom joint.


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Miter joint glue squeeze out.
I was very happy knowing I've got the right amount of glue in a joint that's supposed to hold back the kind of pressure this things going to experience.


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Miter joints still look great.
I'm beside myself as this goes together as planned. All of a sudden, I'm hooked on this hobby, and my first project doesn't even work yet! The blue tape on the corners prevents glue from sticking the front baffle in place; there's no glue around the top yet. The other tape forms handles to allow front baffle removal.


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Letting it cook overnight.
Now I can relax.


Continued next...
Peter
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Old 13th August 2006, 08:58 PM   #12
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Default Still More Pics...

The Pics continue... (will it ever stop?)


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The clamps are off.
I'm lucky to have a nice selection of clamps. Nice clamps... goooood clamps.


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Top view.
You can see the amp housing and the miter joints ready to accept the front baffle.


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Sealing with polyurethane...
...is messy but it works. No one will see the inside of the cabinet. Except you... Gack!


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Nice tight miter joints!
I couldn't be happier with how these joints have turned out. I can tell that I made a good choice to do this glue up in stages.


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Cabinet braces installed.
I've glued the braces in and this puppy is dead. I'm surprised at the difference after these are in. The cabinet doesn't appear to resonate at all....and it doesn't even have the 2" thick front baffle glued on yet!


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Routing the amp flange rabbet completed.
The amp fits nicely in the housing. Still have to pre-drill for the screws. Hopefully I don't blow through the back of the cabinet after all this effort to seal it up!


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Close up view.
I've sealed the inside of the amp housing, but, like so much with this project, it's overkill.


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Time for a break.
I've also taken my block plane to remove the glue squeeze-out. Works a treat.


With this construction, the cabinet alone will weigh 90 lbs! With the amp and driver installed, it will tip the scales at 130 lbs....truly a Box of Pain. So that's it's name. Either that or the Backbreaker 6000.

Well, that's it for now. I'm working on the front baffle so I can install it, plug in the driver, and test it out.

Check back soon for more...
Peter
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Old 14th August 2006, 02:26 AM   #13
F1 FAN is offline F1 FAN  Canada
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Nice work Choots! Doing the mitre joints certainly looks like a lot extra work compared to regular butt joints. But you ended up with perfect corners and no srew holes to fill.
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Old 15th August 2006, 05:57 PM   #14
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Default Front baffle

Thanks F1... I appreciate it. It has been alot of work but fun in it's own way...

I spent some time last night laying out the driver opening cutout in the front baffle. I've made my own circle cutting jig, just because it was probably easier than ordering a Jasper jig. (Plus I'm a cheapie when it comes to things like that...)

Also, I've cut the back of the baffle down to size to fit on the front piece (I'm doing a double-thickness front baffle). When I screwed them together temporarily, it fits extremely nicely. In fact, there's a satisfying hiss as the baffle pushes air out of the cabinet and seats itself into the miter joints as if it's on hydraulics!


Now, the bigger thing is that I've decided to take advantage of this past weekend's Deal of The Weekend at PE to purchase another driver and build... yes, ANOTHER sub, to match this one!!!

I know it will be more work than if I had started them at the same time, but all the advice I got said to go for it... I'll be able to use the second channel of my FBQ2496 Parametric EQ to smooth out the response, and I'll eventually be doing some room treatment. It sounds like several people on the PE Tech talk board are doing this today and are very satisfied...

Anyone have any thoughts out there about running multiple subs? The good and the bad?

Thanks,
Peter
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Old 15th August 2006, 06:17 PM   #15
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
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http://www.audioholics.com/techtips/...lacementP1.php
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Old 17th August 2006, 03:55 PM   #16
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Thanks for the link Scott.

I've seen this type of info on Audioholics before, but not this article. It looks good and I'm wanting to see the second article in this series.


I'll be using a variety of different measurement tools once I get the sub completed. I plan to use some PC based Real time analyzer apps and the Room EQ Wizard to adjust the sub output with the Behringer FBQ2496 Parametric EQ.

Still working on the front baffle...!

Peter
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Old 21st August 2006, 03:30 AM   #17
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Default Front Baffle Update - Pics 1!

I've completed my front baffle and have new pictures. I suppose creating a big box is not that novel, but I thought I'd give an update on what challenges I had finishing the 2" front baffle, routing and rabbeting the driver opening, and test-fitting and glue-up of the baffle assembly.


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Routing the front baffle.
I used a 3/4" wide straight bit with a 1/2" shank to cut the driver rabbet to a depth of 3/4"; this eliminated any chatter and resulted in a smoothly cut rabbet.


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Homemade circle cutting jig.
Obviously it's a pretty simple affair. A 1/4" piece of masonite screwed on as a router base with a few carefully measured holes... I used the drill bit as a pin. It worked like a charm!


Click the image to open in full size.
Close up.
Leaving only a small opening for the bit helped keep the dust from going everywhere.


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Driver opening cutout.
I used a 1/4" straight bit to cut down and create the opening. I used my Rigid vac to keep the dust down, and it worked great. I cut out the back opening with my jigsaw, as this produced less dust, didn't dull my router bits, and was quicker.


Click the image to open in full size.
Gluing the back piece to the front baffle.
Once this glue-up was done, I then finished the rear opening with my 1" flush trimming bit, running the bearing against the front panel rabbet.


More to come...
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Old 21st August 2006, 02:20 PM   #18
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Default Front Baffle Pics 2

With the baffle glued up, I'm ready for finishing the opening, drilling mounting holes, test fitting the driver, and cutting chamfers on the backside.


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The finished front baffle.
I cut the rear chamfers with a 1/2" chamfering bit. I originally was looking for a much deepr bit to make bigger chamfers, but after recessing the driver by 3/4", it opened up the back of the driver, The chamfers didn't need to be as deep to give good air flow out of the rear of the driver.


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Closeup of the rear of the panel.
Here's a better view of the back panel. I spent too much time thinking about this before jumping in...


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Driver recessed into baffle.
Originally, I didn't see that the Drake design called for recessing the driver into the front baffle, but once I did this made the rest of the baffle construction easier.


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The RSS315HF-4 in position
With the driver positioned in the 2" baffle, the mounting screws just fit nicely enough into the t-nuts to hold.


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Driver test fit.
This went together easily the first time. Now I can't wait to get this thing installed.


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Front baffle with driver.
In this test fit, you can see there is plenty of room for air movement out of the back of the driver.


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Glue-up.
A little brute force ensures a good bond. The worst thing about the glue-up is trying to work rapidly to get an even spread of glue on eight miter joints and eight vertical surfaces, and then get it all put together before the MDF swells and it won't fit together. Fortunately, it didn't take too long, and went together nicely.


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No turning back now...
All the clamps are tight, and all the joints look perfect.


Once the clamps come off, I will seal the interior baffle joints with polyurethane, pre-drill for the amp flange screws, then install both the driver and amp for testing.

The Backbreaker 6000.1 is born.

Peter
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Old 21st August 2006, 02:44 PM   #19
bibster is offline bibster  France
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Choots,

Your pictures proof that one can *never* have enough clamps!
Lovely build that is, really nice!

Cheers, Paul
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Old 21st August 2006, 04:14 PM   #20
Choots is offline Choots  Canada
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Thanks Paul!

I like my clamps...and I subscribe to that theory.

And I think I'm learning how to do this more efficiently so I can build my second one more quickly!

Cheers,
Peter
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