How to renew the look of the subwoofer driver - diyAudio
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Old 8th March 2006, 05:50 PM   #1
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Question How to renew the look of the subwoofer driver

Hello friends! I am new here and I would like to know how do I recover the "Brand new look" of my JBL 15" driver... It looks like old...

I heard that I can use water+glue mix with a soft brush...

Is this correct??
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Old 8th March 2006, 06:46 PM   #2
Bobken is offline Bobken  United Kingdom
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Hi,

And welcome to the Forum.

I am not familiar with this particular woofer, nor what design of speaker the driver is used in by the speaker makers.

However, anything you do like this is more likely to have an adverse effect on the sound, rather than the opposite, so I wouldn't try this, myself.

Diaphragms are usually 'doped' with some care to perform in a specific way, and adding to this doping in any way or changing it will probably upset this 'balance'. Also, it is not any old "glue" which is used by makers when doing this.

Sorry if this seems discouraging, but this is reality I believe, and for most people the sound would be more important than the appearance here.

If it looks so bad, can you fabricate a grille to cover this, perhaps?
When dealing with such low frequencies as most large woofers do, this shouldn't have any adverse effect sonically, even if there was no grille originally.

I hope this helps, even if it may not be quite what you were expecting.
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Old 8th March 2006, 07:06 PM   #3
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Originally It does have a grille. It is a JBL Subwoofer for home theaters, the D-115.


Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.



The Grille itself is broken... I think I will try to fix it or make a new one....

Thanks a lot
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Old 8th March 2006, 09:34 PM   #4
Bobken is offline Bobken  United Kingdom
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Hi,

Yes, that looks good and I think it would be by far the best way of resolving this.

Doing anything with the drive unit itself, would not be so good, I am sure.

Luckily, for bass units like these, the grille is not so critical as with mid-range drivers or tweeters, as far as the sound is concerned.

It would be OK if you don't mind a change in its appearance, if you made some kind of a frame, and maybe covered it with some thin black cloth wrapped around the frame.

Good luck, anyway.

Regards,
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Old 10th March 2006, 12:13 AM   #5
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Spray some laquer on the cone, make sure you dont think it down too much.

Is the foam in good condition?
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Old 10th March 2006, 09:28 AM   #6
Bobken is offline Bobken  United Kingdom
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Hi,

I don't wish to fall out with the big man here, but please be very way of doing anything like this.

In (nearly) every case with these kinds of woofers there will be several glued interfaces, like between the cone and the surround, and the surround and the basket.

Any kind of volatile materials used can/will adversely affect the adhesives used here, and could result in disaster!

Check this out, say with a Speaker Re-coning Company, if you doubt what I say here, and you will find that this kind of experimentation will be far more likely to cause problems than not.

More importantly anything added to a bass driver's cone will inevitably affect some of its parameters (e.g.T/S), which with a well-designed sub-woofer should have been factored into the design of the entire unit. Any surface treatment is quite likely to affect the flexibility of the cone material, and will add something to its mass, unfortunately.

For your own sake, please be careful.

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Old 10th March 2006, 10:57 AM   #7
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Thank you all guys!!

I think IŽll just try to recover the grille!!!


I donŽt want to destroy my equipment!


Have a nice weekend!
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Old 10th March 2006, 01:05 PM   #8
Bobken is offline Bobken  United Kingdom
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Hi,

This is by far the safest way, and with these low frequencies from a sub, any grille material which is reasonably thin, is unlikely to affect the sound at all.
Anyway, you can try this out first before committing yourself permanently, by simply wrapping the cloth around the speaker and maybe holding it with some sticky-tape, if necessary.

With mid to high frequencies, this is not the same, of course, as any fabric is more likely to have some non-linear attenuating effect here, and it is best to select something which is 'accoustically transparent' for this purpose.

I knew of a DIYer who coated the insides of his speaker enclosures with a bitumen-based damping compound, hopefully, to reduce resonances. Unfortunately, he only left it a couple of days before re-installing the drivers and closing up the box again.

Within a few weeks, the 'fumes' alone had eaten through his foam surrounds, and the drivers were rendered useless!

On at least one Speaker Supplies site, I have seen their advice to avoid using many types of volatile glues when sticking damping pads (which they supply for damping purposes) inside enclosures, or at least leaving things to fully dry out for many days (even weeks!).
This, they say, is to avoid any remaining fumes from attacking the adhesive which sticks the surrounds/cones/baskets etc. together, and ruining the drivers.

Have a good week-end.

Regards,
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