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Old 16th August 2014, 07:51 PM   #1
Egindin is offline Egindin  United States
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Default Expensive drivers - are they worth the money?

I'm in the process of building a pair of subs (for below 80 Hz) for my all horn system. I'm dead set on sealed boxes and have already built a pair of 2.0 ft sq. I know it's not the smartest approach - to build boxes first and then to look for drivers...well, nobody's perfect and I like woodworking. My musical tastes are classical and jazz. Anyways, I've looked at some drivers (I'd prefer 10" over 12", but I'm open to being convinced in the error of my ways) and noticed a huge disparity in prices. You can buy a $40 driver and you can buy a $400 driver of the same size. Specifically, I've looked at Dayton Audio drivers ($120-170) and Seas W26FX001 ($400) Do I get twice the performance if I buy Seas? Those of you who truly experimented and compared (and know first hand what they're talking about) - do you get your moneys worth buy buying expensive drivers?
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Old 16th August 2014, 08:02 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Egindin View Post
Those of you who truly experimented and compared (and know first hand what they're talking about) - do you get your moneys worth buy buying expensive drivers?
Generally, yes.
To compare woofers you need to compare displacement, which is Sd (cone area) times Xmax (linear displacement).

The Seas W26FX001 linear displacement is 14 mm peak to peak, Xmax is one way, the Seas has only 7mm Xmax.
The Seas costs more than a typical subwoofer because it goes smoother to a higher frequency, not of much concern for most who would cross a sub around 100 Hz.

The more expensive drivers tend to have more displacement, doubling displacement means 6 dB more output potential. Doubling displacement requires twice the magnet structure, better heat management systems, and tougher suspensions, all expensive. Often, two lesser drivers are a better choice, as doubling cone area gives a "free" +3 dB gain in sensitivity, and two voice coils may handle heat better than one.

That said, Dayton has some very good $$ to displacement ratios.

Last edited by weltersys; 16th August 2014 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 16th August 2014, 08:06 PM   #3
a.wayne is offline a.wayne  United States
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Doubling is always better .....
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Old 16th August 2014, 08:36 PM   #4
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When doubling drivers, are they simply wired in parallel, or are there some electronics needed since the total resistance is less?
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Old 16th August 2014, 09:15 PM   #5
a.wayne is offline a.wayne  United States
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Depends on the control freq they will be operating at ....
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Old 16th August 2014, 09:34 PM   #6
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Can you expand on this please? I'm a beginner at speaker design!
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Old 16th August 2014, 09:39 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by tonytopshed View Post
When doubling drivers, are they simply wired in parallel, or are there some electronics needed since the total resistance is less?
You can simply wire a pair of drivers in parallel if the amplifier is capable of running the lower impedance, or you can wire drivers in series. A parallel pair is half the single driver's impedance, a series pair is double.

For more than two drivers you can wire even amounts of drivers in series parallel combinations.
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Old 16th August 2014, 09:52 PM   #8
Egindin is offline Egindin  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltersys View Post
Generally, yes.
To compare woofers you need to compare displacement, which is Sd (cone area) times Xmax (linear displacement).

The Seas W26FX001 linear displacement is 14 mm peak to peak, Xmax is one way, the Seas has only 7mm Xmax.
The Seas costs more than a typical subwoofer because it goes smoother to a higher frequency, not of much concern for most who would cross a sub around 100 Hz.

The more expensive drivers tend to have more displacement, doubling displacement means 6 dB more output potential. Doubling displacement requires twice the magnet structure, better heat management systems, and tougher suspensions, all expensive. Often, two lesser drivers are a better choice, as doubling cone area gives a "free" +3 dB gain in sensitivity, and two voice coils may handle heat better than one.

That said, Dayton has some very good $$ to displacement ratios.
I actually thought of using 2x10" drivers if I could find a model that would work well in 2 ft sq. I already have Dayton Audio SPA 500 plate amps. Any recommendations?
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Old 16th August 2014, 11:17 PM   #9
Einric is offline Einric  United States
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It looks like either Dayton RSS265HO-44 or the Dayton UM10-22 will work as a pair in a 2cuft sealed enclosure.
Both simulate the same as far as response goes but the UM10 is a bit more sensitive.
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Old 16th August 2014, 11:43 PM   #10
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Hi,

Cheap drivers are generally poor, expensive drivers generally poor value.

You don't get twice as much in the slightest paying top dollar
over buying good value good drivers at about half the price.

A pair of Eminence Lab12's or Dayton 12's is a good idea.
Generally 2cuft will suit decent 12's sealed. 2x10's can
work too as an equivalent to a 14" driver, but its all a
balance of max SPL, sensitivity and bass depth.

Max SPL probably 2x10's, otherwise probably 1x12.

rgds, sreten.
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Last edited by sreten; 16th August 2014 at 11:45 PM.
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