Cool find inside my laptop: world's smallest subwoofer - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Subwoofers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20th November 2012, 04:04 AM   #1
OscarS is offline OscarS  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Default Cool find inside my laptop: world's smallest subwoofer

Doing some laptop repair, I found this little bugger in there, part of the integrated Harmon-kardon 2.1 system:

Click the image to open in full size.


Get this, it's even ported! LOL

Click the image to open in full size.


Naturally it's not a real "subwoofer", but it's still pretty cool. Poor little bugger is tuned to 144 Hz, lol.

Click the image to open in full size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th November 2012, 04:12 AM   #2
freax is offline freax  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
freax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: NSW
I would be really interested in finding something around the 2 inch range, in a non-plastic design to go inside of a 2U rackmount case.

Oh btw have you seen this?: Stylish Portable USB Powered Laptop/PC Speaker (USB Jack) - Free Shipping - DealExtreme

These little puppies have a passive driver in the middle and two "stereo" drivers on each end, though It doesn't produce much if any stereo seperation, it does produce a nice sound, which is probably coming from the paper "panel" on either end.

I've always wondered what a pair of these puppies would sound like for 1 channel.

I can't seem to get the thing open bar from undoing 6 screws, 3 on each end, and it feels like it could handle more power above 500hz but the tiny amp inside (or the usb interface) just can't cut it.

And it sounds distorted when generating frequencies below about 120Hz, which is to be expected.

Woof woof.

Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by freax; 20th November 2012 at 04:18 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th November 2012, 04:15 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
picowallspeaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
I have found something similar in a LCD monitor, and I use them as tweeters ( + waveguide)

@ Freaxs - I have also found something similar : look if the voice coil is oval ?!! Same from Sony a
double cone but one piece, but with two motors...New frontiers !!!!

Last edited by picowallspeaker; 20th November 2012 at 04:18 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th November 2012, 04:22 AM   #4
OscarS is offline OscarS  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
that USB speaker thing is cool. This laptop has 6 built-in USB ports.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th November 2012, 07:20 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Wellington
Those long skinny drivers do indeed have long, oval voice coils. The voice coil gaps in the magnet assembly are straight, and the curved ends of the voice coil are out in free air. (I have a set of TDK speakers with the same style of driver.) If you think that's odd, take some cell phones apart.. they have some very odd shaped voice coils and diaphragms. A lot of the cutting edge research into driver design is taking place for cellphone use - how to get loud, low distortion sound from tiny drivers and spaces. They run them right on their limits for excursion and voice coil temperature.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2012, 03:01 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
picowallspeaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Thx Don. I did put in use the little oval ( 4 Ω-3W-rubber surround ) and it sounds...
good! Preceded by a 33 uF cap and with the aid of a woofer...well, the typical FAST, with about 3-4 mH inductor. Also the woofers came from dumping diving...a big fat sony Tv
with subwoofers inside! The double/one cone 2 motors from the same Tv don't sound
as good ( guess.. )
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2012, 03:52 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Quote:
Those long skinny drivers do indeed have long, oval voice coils. The voice coil gaps in the magnet assembly are straight, and the curved ends of the voice coil are out in free air. (I have a set of TDK speakers with the same style of driver.) If you think that's odd, take some cell phones apart.. they have some very odd shaped voice coils and diaphragms. A lot of the cutting edge research into driver design is taking place for cellphone use - how to get loud, low distortion sound from tiny drivers and spaces. They run them right on their limits for excursion and voice coil temperature.
You're right about that. Being a bit of a speaker tinkerer my ears prick up at things around me that others take for granted.. and I have notice what you mention about cell phones. Standing in line next to someone and hearing Beethoven's “Ode to Joy” in their pocket sounding way too good to possibly be coming from their pocket left me a bit awestruck.

If anyone is interested in playing with USB audio there is a nice little bit of open source freeware called Foobar. I use it to listen to online radio streams and audio files on my PC.
Dedicated USB sound devices like the little soundbar linked to above come packaged with software for some form of GUI for making adjustments. That can range from very simple to very useful. Just in case anyone here is unfamiliar with USB audio, it bypasses the PC's soundcard. The laptop's/soundcard's DAC feeds analog to the headphone jack but the output at the USB jacks is digital. So plug in devices have to either have their own onboard DAC or
one has to be inserted inline between the USB jacks and the device.

With Foobar, regardless of what level of control you are provided by the USB sound device's software/GUI, you have a much fuller gamut of audio control on your desktop between the audio source and the USB jacks.

I'm really not that well versed in this stuff, there may be even better commercial (expensive) options out there. But I had presented this question about controlling output to the USB jacks to a pretty knowledgeable crowd over at gearslutz.com and Foobar was recommended more than once.

All of the utilities in the screenshots below can be used to control either the PC's soundcard or you can select an option for the software to insert itself between the audio source and the USB jacks. Pretty cool really.


Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by peace brainerd; 27th November 2012 at 03:59 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2012, 05:05 PM   #8
OscarS is offline OscarS  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
that's pretty cool. B&Ws desktop/computer speakers also use the USB digital stream to feed their speakers, which in turn have built-in DACs.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
World's smallest subwoofer? ByronInPortland Subwoofers 12 16th November 2011 04:01 AM
Good way to keep laptop cool?? chipper Everything Else 10 28th January 2011 08:23 PM
World's Largest Subwoofer orangeshasta Everything Else 9 27th July 2008 03:06 PM
Where can I find Smallest Volume Remote Kit ?? calico88 Chip Amps 11 19th June 2008 12:32 PM
Oki Electric Industry intros "world's smallest MP3 chip" Nordic Parts 1 16th September 2006 10:21 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:19 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2