Why do my subs BOOM so much when they are in the front corner - diyAudio
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Old 9th February 2011, 10:25 PM   #1
djn is offline djn  United States
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Default Why do my subs BOOM so much when they are in the front corner

a couple of years ago I built two subs out of 1950 sealed corner cabs. I loaded them with Martin Logan 12" sub woofers and installed BASH 300 amps in each one. When they are in the corner I can't seem to dial them in right. Either they are booming or to low in volume. What gives?
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Old 10th February 2011, 04:15 AM   #2
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corner loading? which way are you firing them? did you try firing them into the wall and also out towards you?
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Old 10th February 2011, 04:40 AM   #3
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Try moving them out slightly from the wall, or closer... also lifting them off the floor...

When ur in the corner ur loading to the room is quite different than at the wall/floor intersection.

pi space is on a floor, pi/2 is a floor and a wall, pi/4 is floor and two walls (corner).

The freq response is different in each position as are the room nodes.

If you are smack dab into the corner, you are more or less tightly coupled to pi/4, but if you move it out or up, ur then less tightly coupled, so the effect is modified some... if you are able to run a freq sweep or FFT and see the curve in your listening position area that might help as well.

Also, you may be actually hearing the alignment of the speaker - Qts - in a way that you find displeasing, whereas when the same speaker is elsewhere it may be that the "extra" bump in response helps due to a suck out, etc...

One would have to know more about the speaker and the room and the measured response to make a much better guesstimate as to what is happening, imo.

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Old 10th February 2011, 08:35 AM   #4
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If you can reposition the subs, try pulling them forward so that the distances to the side and rear walls are different. I recently modified by HI-Fi speakers and the extra restiction in the ports tuned them lower - I found I was able to get closer to the corner to compensate with the loss of bass efficiency. I positioned them by just listening at my normal listening position. I found that repositioning the speakers by as little as 2" (50mm) made an audible difference.
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Old 10th February 2011, 08:06 PM   #5
djn is offline djn  United States
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Thanks all. I have the room to move them out to next to my speakers. I'll try that tonight are report back.

I don't have any measuring equipment so I'll have to do this by ear.
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Old 11th February 2011, 01:20 AM   #6
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Try this trick:

Put the subwoofer in your listening chair, then walk around the room until you hear the best bass. Once you've found the location that delivers the best-sounding bass, put the subwoofer there. Room acoustics work in reverse at low frequencies, so what you hear at your seat should be similar to what you heard when you were walking around the room.
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Old 11th February 2011, 02:53 AM   #7
niko084 is offline niko084  United States
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First it's in the corner... So you corner loaded.

Second, as stated a little more technically..

You are at the back wall with the corner at the ceiling again, you get a rolling reflection from that edge, it can be upwards of +3db, although pretty nice if you don't mind the incredible power that the sound can have it's great for when you can't have it up loud.
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Old 11th February 2011, 03:14 PM   #8
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We had that exact same problem at my house. We now have them between our towers and TV and Amps and everything, and it sounds alot better. Try doing that, it should work!
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Old 11th February 2011, 06:58 PM   #9
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OK, last night I pulled them out of the corners and they really tighten up. Here are a couple plots from the room reinforcement program and it shows (the first one) that the bass is increased but fairly flat. Not so in real life. The next graph show an increase in responce when the subs are pulled out 3' from both the side wall and back wall.

Looking at the first graph, I figured since it was so flat, I could just turn down the volume and had a good flat responce, but noooooo. Didn't work out that way. What gives.
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File Type: jpg Room boundary out of corner.JPG (132.2 KB, 146 views)
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Old 11th February 2011, 08:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djn View Post
OK, last night I pulled them out of the corners and they really tighten up. Here are a couple plots from the room reinforcement program and it shows (the first one) that the bass is increased but fairly flat. Not so in real life. The next graph show an increase in responce when the subs are pulled out 3' from both the side wall and back wall.

Looking at the first graph, I figured since it was so flat, I could just turn down the volume and had a good flat responce, but noooooo. Didn't work out that way. What gives.
Taterworks reciprocity suggestion is good advice.

That said, the graphs posted show nothing of the in room response of your subs, and the phase relationship of your subs with your main speakers.

Have you determined that your subs are both in polarity with the mains, and both mains are proper polarity ?

What are you using as a crossover between the two?

Have you taken the subs outside to determine they don't have a big peak that is being reinforced by the corner placement?
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