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Old 28th February 2011, 03:20 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mordor View Post
Plywood imho is the better material, light, strong and sound good. Mdf is to heavy and imho have a bad sound for a bass / guitar application.
Hi,
How do you define your "good sound" with the plywood?

I've built quite a few bass amp cabs and have always gone for MDF. I tried plywood and it's cheaper but for me is doesn't sound as good and can be difficult to work with. I found there was more flex in the cabinet with ply, which means for a more resonant sound (so louder, I guess) but the bass is much slower. The rigidity of MDF makes the transient response better, the kind of thing you really need when you're talking about 15" cones...

just my 2 cents

and BuildbyHands, the tweeter is the small driver which deals with high frequencies (something that you may not think is too important but can really bring a punch to the sound of your bass). To my experience if you use a compression driver you don't need to use a crossover, you would want to wire a small high power resistor is series with the tweeter though.
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Old 12th March 2011, 01:45 PM   #12
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I have got all my material and starting putting thing together. Could any one give me instructions of how to wire from woofer to input jack.

the woofer comes with two plugs (connections) - Red and Black. the input jack comes with three prongs.

Thanks
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Old 12th March 2011, 01:52 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thefamilybassman View Post
........

and BuildbyHands, the tweeter is the small driver which deals with high frequencies (something that you may not think is too important but can really bring a punch to the sound of your bass). To my experience if you use a compression driver you don't need to use a crossover, you would want to wire a small high power resistor is series with the tweeter though.
Oo-er. I wouldn't use a compression driver without a crossover unless you want it to cook...

With piezo tweeters (which are inherantly capacitive - they'll cross themselves over), you can get away without a crossover, though they're much better with.

Chris
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Old 12th March 2011, 07:00 PM   #14
epa is offline epa  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuildByHands View Post


the woofer comes with two plugs (connections) - Red and Black. the input jack comes with three prongs.

Thanks
speaker jack should be 2 prongs.
jack with 3 is for symetric signal or stereo signal ,high impendance.(usually)
connect red to tip end black to sleeve,leave ring(midle sleeve) unatached

Last edited by epa; 12th March 2011 at 07:02 PM.
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Old 25th March 2011, 10:36 PM   #15
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thefamilybassman,

My cabinet is completely sealed.
Few friends told me that I have to make holes in my cabinet so the speaker won't be blown. is this correct?

Currently, my cabinet have:

1) speaker (wired to input jack)
2) input jack ( wire to speaker)

If I am to include a tweeter, how I am going to wire between the three.

Could you draw picture how to apply the high power resister to it? and what tweeter would fit 300 watts cabinet?

I really appreciate your advice.





Quote:
Originally Posted by thefamilybassman View Post
Hi,
How do you define your "good sound" with the plywood?

I've built quite a few bass amp cabs and have always gone for MDF. I tried plywood and it's cheaper but for me is doesn't sound as good and can be difficult to work with. I found there was more flex in the cabinet with ply, which means for a more resonant sound (so louder, I guess) but the bass is much slower. The rigidity of MDF makes the transient response better, the kind of thing you really need when you're talking about 15" cones...

just my 2 cents

and BuildbyHands, the tweeter is the small driver which deals with high frequencies (something that you may not think is too important but can really bring a punch to the sound of your bass). To my experience if you use a compression driver you don't need to use a crossover, you would want to wire a small high power resistor is series with the tweeter though.

Last edited by BuildByHands; 25th March 2011 at 10:41 PM.
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Old 28th March 2011, 05:08 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuildByHands View Post
thefamilybassman,

My cabinet is completely sealed.
Few friends told me that I have to make holes in my cabinet so the speaker won't be blown. is this correct?

Could you draw picture how to apply the high power resister to it? and what tweeter would fit 300 watts cabinet?
Properly porting (holes or duct tubes) your cabinet could make it louder down low, too much power will burn the speaker or rip up the cone whether ported or sealed.

A resistor alone will not protect a tweeter, at minimum you will need a capacitor and a resistor wired in series with the tweeter, unless the tweeter is the same sensitivity as the woofer, then the resistor may be left out.

Amp+ to capacitor in, capacitor out to resistor in, resistor out to tweeter +, tweeter - to amp -.

The capacitor and resistor values are dependent on the tweeter you choose.
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Old 28th March 2011, 09:07 PM   #17
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I've never heard of a sealed or ported cabinet tear up speakers. So far as I know, only certain horns can tear them, and that's down to the pressure difference across the cone.
Sealed or ported are pretty constant across the cone, so I can't see any problems here.

Chris
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Old 29th March 2011, 05:06 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
I've never heard of a sealed or ported cabinet tear up speakers. So far as I know, only certain horns can tear them, and that's down to the pressure difference across the cone.
Sealed or ported are pretty constant across the cone, so I can't see any problems here.

Chris
Over the course of years, had many speakers in monitor cabinets torn or kinked from being driven below Fb, trying to get too much kick drum with no low cut filter.

And that was in the days when they were being driven with "only" 175 watts.

It is pretty easy to exceed Xmech even with fairly low power with a bass guitar, slapping the strings can put out very high amplitude signals down to a few Hz.

A bass player friend of mine mechanically killed his JBL D-130 on the first slap, the voice coil exited the gap, and squashed itself trying to go back in.
Expensive.

I don't recall the amp for sure, but it was probably no more than 60 watts in to a sealed enclosure.

Art
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Old 29th March 2011, 08:45 PM   #19
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Ah, I thought you meant actually ripping up the cone - like I said, I've only heard of that in horn enclosures.

Mechanical damage such as the stuff you've described... I can believe it.
Try slap bass into an open backed 10" combo. The driver's Xmax was 3mm (one way), and we passed that nice and quickly. Ended up at somewhere around 16mm p/p transients. The ringing notes were more like 8mm p/p. This was on less than 30w... Lurvely
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Old 30th March 2011, 02:48 PM   #20
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All,
Thank you for all your advice.

I have searched for 300 watt 8 ohm head but could not see one. I have read some blogs and I understand that:

1) I can use amp head with 300 watt 4 ohm. But I will get only around 175 watt

2) I can use an amp head with 500 watt 4 ohm or 300 watt 8 ohm

I want to confirm if my understanding is correct. Therefore, after finish this cabinet (300 watt 8 ohm)

Can I use MarkBass III 500W? Or will it blow the speaker?

The specification is as below.
Markbass Little Mark III 500W Bass Amp Head Features:
  • 4-band EQ for precise tonal control
  • Balanced input for acoustic basses
  • Balanced DI with level control and pre/post switch
Markbass Little Mark III 500W Bass Amp Head Specifications:
  • Inputs
  • Input impedance: 500kOhm, maximum voltage 15Vpp
  • Balanced Input (XLR) impedance: 100kOhm, maximum voltage 25Vpp
  • Effect Return Impedance: 33kOhm, maximum voltage 10Vpp
  • Controls:
  • Gain: -60dB–+23 dB range
  • Master Volume
  • Line Out Level
  • Ground Lift switch on rear panel
  • Pre/Post EQ switch on rear panel
  • Equalization
  • Low: Center frequency 60Hz, level ±16dB
  • Low Mid: Center frequency 360Hz, level ±16dB
  • High Mid: Center frequency 800Hz, level ±16dB
  • High: 5kHz shelf, level ±16dB
  • VPF (Variable Pre-shape Filter): Center frequency 380Hz (cut)
  • VLE (Vintage Loudspeaker Emulator): Frequency range 250Hz–20 kHz (cut)
  • Output:
  • Line Out: Balanced XLR, maximum voltage 20Vpp
  • Effect Send: Unbalanced, maximum voltage 20Vpp (pre-EQ)
  • Tuner Out: Unbalanced, maximum voltage 2Vpp
  • Speaker Out: Speakon & 1/4" combo, 1/4"
  • Weight: 6.4 lb. (2.9kg)
  • Dimensions: 10-9/10" W x 2-4/5" H x 10-1/10" D
  • Output Power: 300W RMS @ 8 ohm, 500W RMS @ 4 ohm


Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
Ah, I thought you meant actually ripping up the cone - like I said, I've only heard of that in horn enclosures.

Mechanical damage such as the stuff you've described... I can believe it.
Try slap bass into an open backed 10" combo. The driver's Xmax was 3mm (one way), and we passed that nice and quickly. Ended up at somewhere around 16mm p/p transients. The ringing notes were more like 8mm p/p. This was on less than 30w... Lurvely
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