RT-2 Horn sub, the result - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Subwoofers
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Gallery Wiki Blogs Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 8th January 2009, 08:40 PM   #1
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Default RT-2 Horn sub, the result

Well, time to give something back to the forum now that I finally have something to contribute with.

A while ago, I gave in to the allure of horn construction and decided to have a go at building a horn loaded sub.

In some old swedish "Radio & Television" magasines my father has, there was a series of articles describing various DIY horn projects.

The articles were very interesting and detailed, and I decided to go for the largest design called "RT-2", published in 1978.


Considering the advances in driver technology, it was with a certain anticipation I looked forward to see what this design could deliver with a modern high quality woofer.

With regards to driver selection, I started off another thread:

Bass horn driver?

Now, many weeks later the horn is completed and tested.

So, how was the result?

Well, in general; disappointing...

The problem was that the horn rolled off to early and to steep, the lowest 1 1/2 octave simply weren't there.

On the positive side, what the horn actually reproduced was tremendously loud and clear. As I increased the volume it just got louder and louder with no sign of distortion or rumble. Except from the sheer sound pressure level, the only sign that it was playing loud was the fact that various objects in my living room suddenly started to resonate on different tones.

In that respect, the horn performed as hoped for and a bit more, it was just such a shame that it didn't really play the deep notes.

If the horn had reproduced the deep notes in the same way, I dare say it would have been awesome.

My conclusion is therefore that the horn as such worked very well, but was simply to small with to high a cut-off, and the steep roll-off meant that any room effects were not enough to give the low frequency reproduction initially hoped for.

This has in no way put me off horns as a concept, on the contrary, but what this has tought me is that a horn going all the way down will probably be just to large to be contemplated in a "normal" domestic environment.

So what the heck am I going to do with the thing?

Well, I've just spent too much time and effort building the darn thing to just simply go and throw it in the nearest landfill.

The plan is to close the horn opening on the underside with a MDF panel and convert the whole thing to a "conventional" BR enclosure. This will be done by cutting two holes in said MDF panel and bolting in a pair of Peerless XXSL 12" alu-cone sub-drivers. The volume is right and the internal horn folding structures will double as excellent structural bracing. I will no longer have the bragging rights afforded by an exotic horn-design, but linear response down to the low 20 Hz region at respectable sound pressure levels is not a bad thing either.


I hope this can be informative to anyone else contemplating horn construction.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg dscf0860-web.jpg (63.1 KB, 1584 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2009, 09:13 PM   #2
jbell is offline jbell  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: .
The problem with many undersized 1/4 wave front loaded horns, is their lack of flat response. It's not uncommon to see a 13db difference between 40 and 100hz for example. Even worse, about 80-100hz, it's now a 1/2 wave horn and really efficient, so your crossover isn't doing what you want it to do..

Most home plate or subwoofer amps, just don't have the eq tools needed to flatten out the response, and make the horn sound like anything you really want to listen to.

Even dropping your crossover down to a ridiculous 40-50hz doesn't yield a satisfying result.

Pay particular attention to the graph of 80hz cross only... see how response is going UP from 100-120? I'm sure your horn is doing the same thing.

Here's a tip for you. (I've done this, and it works) Go buy a 14-18mh inductor, and put it in series with your horn, and set your crossover at 80 hz. Since you aren't running extreme amounts of power, you don't have to go buy a $200 inductor, one of Parts Express $20-$30 versions will do.

I was using a dual MCM 55-2421 front loaded horn with terrible response, and the inductor flattened it right out... In fact it was within 2db of flat from 40-110hz. That horn would do 126db in my living room, but without the inductor, I wouldn't even turn it on..


Attached Images
File Type: jpg t18chart.jpg (54.7 KB, 1318 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2009, 09:30 PM   #3
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Hi jbell,

Thanks for your interesting reply!

As I'm in no way an expert on electro-acoustics, I struggle a bit to grasp how such an inductor could save my horn project, but considering the effort and money spent so far, I'm more than willing to give it a try!

May I ask what sort of horn design you actually tried this on and how you arrived at your solution???

Here's another image of the build viewed from above before the lid went on and without the access cover for the internal rear-chamber.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg dscf0847-web.jpg (92.2 KB, 1574 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2009, 09:33 PM   #4
jbell is offline jbell  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: .
I was editing my post, check out my response graph attached in the above post -- it says it all.... It was a BFM T18. 40hz 1/4 wave horn, that I built 24" wide with Dual MCM 55-2421's.

The general idea (besides the interaction of the inductor with the driver/horn) is that a passive 6db/oct cross at 40-50hz, plus an electronic cross of 12db/oct at 80hz can actually tame the rising response of a 1/4 wave horn. It's amazing, but the combined 18db/oct cross can just barely keep 120hz the same as 80hz in my chart. The good news, is above 120hz it drops like a rock, so that makes for a great cross to your mains.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2009, 09:49 PM   #5
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Hummm... That response curve certainly shows a dramatic change!

And like you say, I tried to drop the X-over point down to 50 Hz without any luck.

What you describe certainly correlates well with my experience, but even if I manage to flatten the response like you did, I'm not to certain that I'll get the desired result... One thing is loping of some excessive efficiency in the mid-bass, but I'm not too convinced that this will save the day as I suspect that below 40-45 Hz there just isn't any efficiency left in the horn..

I have a 10 band parametric EQ which I hooked on and despite pulling the 31 Hz slider well up (perhaps to arround +6 dB) those sweet low's didn't really appear. But looking at your graphs, perhaps that just wasn't enough??

do you have any reference to plans or images of the horn you made?

Would be interesting to see what it looks like compared to mine!

Attached is another image showing a bottom view of the horn just before the access hatch tho the rear chamber is screwed in place. The black trianglular foot is part of the final horn section partially made up by the the floor and the wall which the horn needs to be placed against. The internal volume of the foot is part of the driver rear chamber
Attached Images
File Type: jpg dscf0852-web.jpg (95.7 KB, 1426 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2009, 10:03 PM   #6
jbell is offline jbell  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: .
If you are listening to music, you don't need below 40hz, period. Even for listening to HT... below 40hz is only effects, and the harmonics carry the day.

My horn wouldn't do ANYTHING below 28hz... however I never missed it. What really sounds 'low' to most people is really in the 40hz range.

Do yourself a favor, download sine wave test tones, and see if your horn will play what you want played. If it'll actually do a solid 40hz, I think you'll be happy. Put it in a corner, and you'll be happier... the Corner will artificially "lengthen" your horn some, and the .5 pi loading will help dramatically.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th January 2009, 10:18 PM   #7
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Yes, I do in deed listen to music!

I share your view that there shouldn't be too much interesting going on below 40 Hz, which is why I assumed that I'd be happy with this horn despite the fact that it is obviously a compromise in many respects, both in terms of applied horn theory and theoretical cut-off.

I did hook up a sine generator I have and the horn would give output down to around 30 Hz, albeit at an entirely different level than at 70 Hz. 40 Hz wasn't really that great either, had to sweep up past 50, closer to 60 before it really started to give some.

But I guess this is just the driver playing "straight through" the horn without any actual horn loading taking place....

I did actually try the horn moved in to one corner, but the result was only more of what was already there, no perceptible improvement in low end extension. Nearly broke my back hauling the thing across the floor as well!

Do you still have your horn and can you compare your impression with joys you've had with other systems?

  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 01:31 AM   #8
jbell is offline jbell  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: .
I do have it. With the inductor, it's a great HT / music sub. Keep in mind it has 7ms of delay, so it sounds best in a corner behind you. Considering a 55-2421 costs $25 or less, and the horn can be built with just under 1 sheet of 5ply, it's the loudest, cheapest sub that can be built in my opinion. ($100 total) It's the inductor that's key however... other than that, it's a pa sub, and needs pa style eq to get to a good sound.
18x19x24 sub that can play 126 at listening position, is flat out incredible... Things like halogen light bulb filaments, metal hangers for recessed fixtures, and other things you'd never think of vibrate at that level.

In my opinion, BF has no idea what he has with a dual driver T18... Cubic inch per cubic inch, it's the best design he has to offer. I've burned single driver T18's, T39's, given away THT's, and sold off my 36" wide T36's.... I still have the dual T18. It's designed as a 40hz corner loaded horn, in 2pi space it only loads to 50hz. (which explains my charts)

I still overall prefer the sound of my custom HSU cabinet, and even prefer for jazz my NHT sub over the dual T18. But the fact that I still have it, speaks volumes about it's ability. Any cabinet that doesn't perform, gets burned...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg picture2 144a.jpg (44.9 KB, 1342 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 02:46 AM   #9
tinitus is offline tinitus  Europe
diyAudio Moderator R.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Default Re: RT-2 Horn sub, the result

Quote:
Originally posted by Elbert

The articles were very interesting and detailed, and I decided to go for the largest design called "RT-2", published in 1978.

So, how was the result?

Well, in general; disappointing...


So what the heck am I going to do with the thing?

Well, I've just spent too much time and effort building the darn thing to just simply go and throw it in the nearest landfill.


First I am surprised that noone has warned against using an "old" horn with a "random" selected driver

Second you have chosen Eminence Delta Pro 12", right
Most 12" PRO woofers wont do much bass, and yours neither with Fs of 51hz

I was thinking whether you could "reverse" the horn, and turn it into a closed TL
But with your driver it probably wont do much good
Or maybe mount the woofer in the horn mouth making a tapped horn, or kind of

Still, to get down to 30hz or below you need woofers with low Fs

Unless you can beat the hell out of it with huge amounts of Eq, and hope that theres enough Xmax

Your horn would MAYBE do a bit better if you used a woofer with lower Fs, maybe not
Or, maybe your woofers would do better in another design
I find it a bit hard to see through any of it

Actually your horn is remarkable similar to those very popular BVR, ok maybee not quite so, but anyway they are designet with the use of modern calculators
Also Decware have a similar thing, but uses hifi sub drivers with low Fs

Just thoughts, I may be wrong in most of it
__________________
sometimes we know very little, and sometimes we know too much
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 07:50 AM   #10
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Hmmm.. yes, at first, I was convinved that I'd need a driver witth low Fs, but i was then led to understand that in a horn, it is the actual horrn loading of the driver that determines the result as oposed to driver and cabinet resonance frequency for BR and closed systems.

At the time, it seemed that High BL and a relatively ligh cone-weight was a good priority.

But there's only one way to clarify this, and I'll do that today when I get home.

1:
Se if I can stuff a SEAS 33-WB driver in to the horn, this has a FS of 27Hz, so any distinctive change here should reveal a driver issue.

2:

As for jbell's suggestion, I'll hook up my EQ again (after the X-over) and pull down 6 dB at 120 Hz, that should emulate the inductor-trick he described earlier on.

I'll get back once the results are in!
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 09:51 AM   #11
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Regarding driver Fs:


Bass drivers for direct radiator applications typically have a low fs (lower than fb), medium Qts and fairly high BL. Suitable bass horn drivers, by contrast, fs is higher than fc, Qts lower than 0.35 and higher BL.

ref. the WIKI section.

According to the above, the Eminence Delta-pro 12A driver I chose should be appropriate, or at least so i thought...
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 10:01 AM   #12
bjorno is offline bjorno  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Jacobsmountain
Send a message via MSN to bjorno
Hi Elbert,
In the late seventies, I made a couple of the RT-2 horns using the recommended and other different drivers.

They all had typical horn mid-bass FR characteristics but not enough BW to call the horn a sub that IMO should at least cover 1.5 octave below 80 Hz.

RT-2 is more useful if complemented with satellites FR starting from about 160 Hz-.

Hint:Try to model your RT-2 horn using the given Hornresp template that can be found at this link:

http://www.kensonpro.com/linnaraudio...simulering.htm

b
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 12:46 PM   #13
diyAudio Member
 
technofreak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Send a message via MSN to technofreak
Quote:
Originally posted by Elbert
Regarding driver Fs:


Bass drivers for direct radiator applications typically have a low fs (lower than fb), medium Qts and fairly high BL. Suitable bass horn drivers, by contrast, fs is higher than fc, Qts lower than 0.35 and higher BL.

ref. the WIKI section.

According to the above, the Eminence Delta-pro 12A driver I chose should be appropriate, or at least so i thought...

Delta Pro 12 is a midrange/midbass driver, very good from around 80 to 2000 Hz in a BR. It is regarded as one of the best midrange drivers from Eminence, along with Beta 8 and Alpha 6.

As for a driver's suitability for horn loading, Wikipedia is right - this is a valid approach for midrange horns and many PA bass cabs, which does not need to go below 50 Hz.

However, very good bass horn can be designed around more "typical" driver, too, for example, LABhorn, that goes well into 30-s. The driver used in it, Eminence LAB 12, has T/S parameters more close to home or car sub than a typical PA sub - indeed, I've found a fairly cheap 12" car sub that has parameters close to LAB12 and simulations in Hornresp show, that it, in fact, can be used in LABhorn.

The driver is Signat Fury 12 and costs less than 100Ä here, in Estonia (LAB12 is over 250Ä here). Only worrying thing about this driver is it's claimed 1" voice coil - seems too small for such driver.

Bottom line is, I would certainly try some other driver with lower FS and maybe higher Xmax.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 12:59 PM   #14
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Fantastic bjorno!

I did have a go at some hornresp simulations when trying to select a driver, but it is obvious that the model in the link you refered to is way better than what I managed!

Now I can experiment with some different driver parameters to better get an understanding of whether or not my dissapointment is caused by sub-optimum driver selection or inherent limitations in the horn it self!

I could for instance do a simulation using the parameter of the SEAS 13" I have, and then try it out in practice to see if any simulated changes will materialise in real life.

Can't wait to get home and try this out!
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 01:13 PM   #15
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Hi,
it's obvious looking at the box pic it can never operate as a sub-bass horn. The view of the inside of the box shows it will not even operate as a bass horn.

Three factors determine the LF response of a horn.
Mouth area.
Flare rate.
Path length.

All three factors must be satisfied or come very close to achieve the target response. One can truncate the horn before reaching the desired Mouth area for the loading situation. That is the first compromise.
One can cut off the horn short. That's the second compromise.
One can flare the horn too quickly. That's the third compromise.

There are many other factors to take account of, but these just guild the lily once the basic size is determined.

It looks like all three LF response factors have not just been curtailed, they have been slashed.
Compare the mouth area of 6LabHorns to this box opening.
Compare the path length in a LabHorn to this box.
Compare the Flare rate to that in the LabHorn.
This box was doomed to failure before the designer even sat down to sketch it out.
It is simply too small.

It should make an upper Bass horn or possibly a Mid horn, but too many bends/folds.

Addendum.
one needs 12Labhorns in free space to achieve the 27Hz cutoff.
6LabHorns are needed for floor loading to give the desired Mouth area. That is ~4sqm (~40sqft) for 27Hz in 2Pi loading.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
Sent from my desktop computer using a keyboard
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 01:40 PM   #16
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Andrew,

You are in deed correct in your observations!

These issues were allso adressed in the original article series (in swedish), and the approaches explained and justified.

What my pictures doesn't really show is that the space between the floor of the horn and the flor on which it will stand, is in fact the final section of the horn together with the triangular foot. This makes the horn somewhat longer than the internal horn foldings.

The horn mouth is formed by the slot between the horn flor and the floor. Admittedly, this is does not amount to a huge area, but the theory behind this was that with the elongated mouth this resulted in, the effective mouth area would be doubled due to reflection from the floor or something.

But yes, you are right, even with all the compromises and trics in the world, this can never be a true deep bass sub, you can only bend the rules of physics so much!

Nevertheless, Since I've gone through the trouble of building it, I can just as well play around with it.

If I can conjure out as much as 1/2 octave further down in response compared with the initial results, it might yet prove sufficient for engaging listeing experiences!
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 02:22 PM   #17
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Wow jbell!

If you can get the sort of performance you described out of those modest (size-wise) horns, There should be hope for my build as well!

Sounds like excellent value for money too, must admitt I've spent somewhat mopre on my build so far.. which is probably part of the reason I'm a bit hesitant to burn my project! (not to mention the risk of asphyxiating from the fumes given off by all that burning filler and glue!)

Can you describe the other systems you use or point me to some reference? JUst so I can better understand what you are comparing with.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 02:45 PM   #18
jbell is offline jbell  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: .
billfitzmaurice.com

The T18 is a 7' (or there abouts) length horn. Not sure what your hornresp params are of your horn, but if you are going to get 40hz, you need at least that length. I found that adding an 'extra wrap' to the T18 gave me great response down to 35hz, made the cabinet more efficient overall (I could get to 126 with less power) but once I hit 126, that was it, more power didn't do much... If you want real low, the fitzmaurice table tuba (13' length 22hz horn) is better suited. It's also an open rear chamber front loaded horn, so in some respects may be thought of like a tapped horn, scoop, etc..

I have issues with the response characteristics of undersized 1/4 wave length horns, like what BF has on his site. However I've found that for the table tuba and the T18, that a series inductor can flatten them out enough to be usable, especially in dual driver cabinets.

A mcm 55-2421 is a 4ohm driver, and the cabinet adds 2 ohm in horn inductance, so each driver is considered 6 ohm. A pair of drivers in parallel, is 3 ohm, so every 4ohm stable amp I've tried has driven it with no issues, partially because you never run more than a couple watts of power. The 3 ohm load also makes it easy to get an inductor that will work well. (12mh is usually enough)

one last, 120hz eq at -6, will not help as much as you think. The inductor is -0 at 40hz, -6@80hz, -12@160... (6db/oct) in addition to the -12db/oct crossover, which makes 160 @ -24.

However, if you check out any of the tapped horn threads, or play around with hornresp, you'll see that added inductance 'changes' the response of the horn in more ways that just 6db/oct crossover. This is true for front loaded horns, as well as tapped horns.

hope this helps
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 05:54 PM   #19
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Thanks for all the details jbell!

Now, finally the weekend is here and I'm back in the den!

Just hooked up the old nikko parametric EQ and set the sliders thus:

126 Hz -12 dB
63 Hz - 3 dB
31 Hz +2 dB

That certainly took care of some low mid-bass whoomp, it sounds much drier and neutral now..

But those lowest notes are still missing.

It's particularily noticeable when I play a certain track on a jamariquai (did I spel that right?) record I have where there's a synth sweep that runs straight down in to the basement.

Where as my old BR sub at least follows the sweep down, admittedly dropping in level, the horn still just runs out of breath.

Its the same when play a lot of other albums, just seems like the foundation just isn't quite there..

I haven't looked in to what an inductor reactance will do with the electroacoustics as you pointed out, but I'll see if I can play around
with hornresp a bit later on..

So, the next step will be to borrow a SEAS W33 woofer from one of my main speakers and se how that fares in the horn. (if I can make it fit inside)

To be continued..
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 06:27 PM   #20
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Quote:
Originally posted by Elbert
................
126 Hz -12 dB
63 Hz - 3 dB
31 Hz +2 dB............................
.............
Where as my old BR sub at least follows the sweep down, admittedly dropping in level, the horn still just runs out of breath.
have you looked at the driver cone excursion when playing this torture track?
When a horn unloads (stops working as a horn) the driver behaves as if it had no horn at all. If a back box is fitted (your's has) then that becomes the only load the driver sees.
Is it a sealed box?
You can model it and see what you expect in low end response. Expect interesting results.

If the back box leaks badly, expect your driver to give up the ghost after it has run out of breath.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
Sent from my desktop computer using a keyboard
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 07:33 PM   #21
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
According to the simulation I've done, there's plenty of headroom with regards to max excursion all the way down. Currently I don't even have the amp power available to take me near the damage excursion limit.

And no sir, the rear chamber is 100% tight, the carpentry work was at least one thing I got reasonably right with this project so far!

Now, If I can just get that SEAS woofer in there...
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 09:08 PM   #22
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
.. And in it went...

Well, that was a remarkable difference, suddenly the basement was back in the music!

Allthough there is probably still some room for improvement with proper equalisation and X-over adjustments (and perhaps an inductor), the Horn now seems to go just as deep as the old BR woofer, so that proves that I screwed up on woofer selection and that the horn has true potential given the right driver.

Too bat in a way, that Eminence driver was just soo sexy looking with that big fat magnet and everything!

Enclosed is a hornresp sim based on the horn profile provided by Bjorno was kind enough to share. The gray curve is the result with the 27 Hz Fs SEAS woofer.

http://www.seas.no/images/stories/vi...-wb_and_dd.pdf

The graph shows a somewhat improved low end response, but the audible result was certainly more dramatic than what the simulation plot suggests.

So, goodbye High Fs PA midwoofer and welcome lo Fs HiFi Sub!

but then there is a new problem, the main speaker will want it's woofer back, and I need to find something equaly, or even better, performing to go in the horn...

there are a number of super-low Fs monster woofers out there (a lot of them with very poor efficiency it must be said).

What worries me a bit is that most of these woofers have very heavy cones.

The original article warned against using woofers with heavy cones just like it advised the use of low Fs drivers..

Hmmm..

but now that I've got an improved hornresp model and have performed some practical experimentation correlating simulations with real life results, this tool might be a bit more usefull for selecting a new woofer.

I must however change my conclusion from "disappointing" to "really promising"
Attached Images
File Type: jpg screenhunter_01 jan. 09 23.08.jpg (37.8 KB, 794 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 10:21 PM   #23
tinitus is offline tinitus  Europe
diyAudio Moderator R.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Nice to hear we were on the right track, and you have done good work to prove it, makes it meaningfull to be here

One reason your Seas works subjectively better but really dont measure that much different could, besides the lower Fs, be due to different and higher Qts

A 10" SB Acoustic may be a good choice, but its not the cheapest, 212 EUR from IntertechniK

They also sell the US Dayton, and the 10" RS270S cost only 99 EUR and is said to be real good value

The Dayton has 12mm Xmax which is ok, unless you play exstremely loud
The SB Acoustic is a real performer in terms of Fs and Xmax

I have never heard any of them, just fore inspiration


__________________
sometimes we know very little, and sometimes we know too much
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 10:56 PM   #24
Elbert is offline Elbert  Norway
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
This thread has certainly been useful so far!

One thing is theorizing and discussing, but the real fun part is to do some practical experiments!

Some of those drivers look interesting, but I'm more on the lookout for a 12" driver as this is what the horn is dimensioned for.

Just did some more hornresp sims, and I the general trend seems to be that low Fs woofers with heavy cones generate very uneven responses.

Having said that, the low end extension seem to be better, so it might be that there is an inevitable inherent compromise there.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th January 2009, 11:18 PM   #25
AKN is offline AKN  Sweden
No snake oil
diyAudio Member
 
AKN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the middle of Sweden
Send a message via MSN to AKN
Hi,

I've built that basshorn back in the eighties and I was very satisfied with it, good performance for it's size being a horn.
Back then I had best result with a Gamma LA-1231 (some rebranded Bulgarian unit), very lightweight cone and large VAS. Gamma driver still available at Hi Fi Kit same cone but ferrite magnet opposed the prior AlNiCo magnet used on earlier units. What the motor change have done to the specs I donít know but I suspect performance has decreased somewhat.
I remember that I the gamma unit had limited power capability, remembering that I fried the coil playing loud at a party.
I did also try a low VAS high Fs driver and the result were almost a disaster as I recall.
__________________
/ Anders
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Interesting TL Result Mudge Multi-Way 13 24th March 2004 04:00 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:40 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2017 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2
Wiki