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Old 25th October 2001, 03:47 AM   #1
Chad is offline Chad  United States
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Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Florida, USA
I just finished the http://www.aussieamplifiers.com N-channel, and it has a hum. I measured it with a hz meter and it is 60hz.
When I short the input it stops humming. Not sure if that means anything but that is how we tracked down ground loops in car audio. The pre amp is a Adcom GTP-600. It does not hum when connected to the GFA-5500. I tried unhooking the chassis ground but that didn't stop it. Any ideas on how to stop it?

Thanks in advance,
Chad
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Old 25th October 2001, 03:51 AM   #2
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Chad,
Any chance of a bad connection for the ground of the input jack? Cold solder joint? Loose mechanical connection?

Grey
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Old 25th October 2001, 04:03 AM   #3
Chad is offline Chad  United States
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Grollins,
Everything seems alright, solder looks good, connections are tight. When I shorted the input it was at the end of a 6ft RCA cable that was plugged in to the input jack. So I think the input is alright, but I will double check everything. Thanks for the reply.
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Old 25th October 2001, 05:03 AM   #4
fcel is offline fcel  United States
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May be one of the ground trace on the circuit board is open due to the "accident" as reported on your other thread?
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Old 25th October 2001, 06:07 AM   #5
Dave is offline Dave  New Zealand
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The hum could be due to your power supply layout. I found that using separate rectifiers for the positive and negative supply rails helps to minimize the chances of a loop. Each secondary winding should feed a bridge rectifier, which are then connected to the power supply capacitors. The ground point should be made at the capacitors and all ground leads connected at this point. +/- Connections should also be made at the capacitor terminals not at the rectifiers.

Hope this helps.
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Old 26th October 2001, 03:16 AM   #6
Chad is offline Chad  United States
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Location: Florida, USA
Thank you all for your help. I found the cause of the hum. Believe it or not it wasn't the amp. It was my X-10 signal bridge in my main breaker panel. It was on the same circiut that the amp was plugged into. When I changed plugs the hum stopped. So I plugged the amp back in and moved the X-10 to another ciruit. Now my amp works fine and so does my home automation system.

Chad
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