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Old 27th February 2007, 05:14 PM   #1
prorms is offline prorms  United States
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Default resistors and capacitor which one have the best sound ???

resistors and capacitor which one have the best sound ???


resistor i understand that metal film is not as nosie as carbon film resistor?? which are realy better to use why??

ALSO PERCENTAGE ARE 1% 5% 10% WHICH IS THE BETTER TO USE


WHICH TYPE OF CAPACITOR HAVE THE BEST SOUND QUALITY
capacitor thier are alot of types

polyestor
tantalum
aluminum
ceramic

some other types are
copper film
gold film
silver film

are used in the filter stage of the speaker's
I WOnder about which are the best for the actual power amp




I
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Old 27th February 2007, 05:26 PM   #2
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Default Re: resistors and capacitor which one have the best sound ???

Quote:
Originally posted by prorms

some other types are
copper film
gold film
silver film



I


These are probably best. Sadly, unobtanium at the present state of technology.
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Old 27th February 2007, 11:54 PM   #3
flg is offline flg  United States
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You might find these three articles interesting

http://www.borbelyaudio.com/upgradesmaster.asp
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Old 28th February 2007, 04:01 AM   #4
CBS240 is offline CBS240  United States
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Hi

There is some interesting info on this topic in this interview with Mr. Curl.

BTW, he is aslo a member here at DIYaudio
Attached Files
File Type: pdf john curl interview.pdf (28.3 KB, 266 views)
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Old 28th February 2007, 07:19 AM   #5
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prorms,

a current flowing through an electronic component generates noise, because of electrons bumping in to the component material.
The material of a metalfilm resistor where the current flows through has a more homogenous structure, the electron humping happens less, resulting in a lower noise level.
A good amplifier should amplify the signal perfectly, without adding noise.
All the noise that is generated by the voltage ripple of the powersupply and the contributions of the various passive and active components has to be surpressed to such a level that it is not bothersome.
Too much noise, and you'll hear it through your loudspeakers during low volume level passages.
A higher current level through a component creates a higher noise level.
Component noise in an amp circuit will also be amplified, noise that is created closer to the amp input will be amplified more.
Up till the late 70s, early 80s, a lot of amplifiers were noisy because of carbons, a carbon resistor has no place in a good pre-amp circuit.
There is no way a high amplification phono stage can be built that has a low noise level by using carbon resistors, and all RIAA components require high accuracy.

For accurate reproduction you want the amplifier to operate accurately.
At some locations in a circuit you wish two resistors to be well matched.
Metalfilm resistors are either 1% or 2% accurate, depending on the power handling.
Carbon resistors are never that accurate.
For a few extra cents you get less noise and a resistor accuracy that is sufficient in most cases, so no need to measure and match.
If you need a resistor with a higher than average power handling, metalfilm ones can be matched much more easily.
For instance a 0.6W or 1W resistor, often 2% accurate. Buy 10 of them, and chances are good that you'll find enough which are accurate within 1% of the nominal value.
The carbons also have a bunch of other attributes that make them a less well choice for solid state amps.
There's only 1 location in an amplifier circuit where carbons have the edge.
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Old 28th February 2007, 07:40 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by jacco vermeulen
prorms,

a current flowing through an electronic component generates noise, because of electrons bumping in to the component material.
The material of a metalfilm resistor where the current flows through has a more homogenous structure, the electron humping happens less, resulting in a lower noise level.
A good amplifier should amplify the signal perfectly, without adding noise.
All the noise that is generated by the voltage ripple of the powersupply and the contributions of the various passive and active components has to be surpressed to such a level that it is not bothersome.
Too much noise, and you'll hear it through your loudspeakers during low volume level passages.
A higher current level through a component creates a higher noise level.
Component noise in an amp circuit will also be amplified, noise that is created closer to the amp input will be amplified more.
Up till the late 70s, early 80s, a lot of amplifiers were noisy because of carbons, a carbon resistor has no place in a good pre-amp circuit.
There is no way a high amplification phono stage can be built that has a low noise level by using carbon resistors, and all RIAA components require high accuracy.

For accurate reproduction you want the amplifier to operate accurately.
At some locations in a circuit you wish two resistors to be well matched.
Metalfilm resistors are either 1% or 2% accurate, depending on the power handling.
Carbon resistors are never that accurate.
For a few extra cents you get less noise and a resistor accuracy that is sufficient in most cases, so no need to measure and match.
If you need a resistor with a higher than average power handling, metalfilm ones can be matched much more easily.
For instance a 0.6W or 1W resistor, often 2% accurate. Buy 10 of them, and chances are good that you'll find enough which are accurate within 1% of the nominal value.
The carbons also have a bunch of other attributes that make them a less well choice for solid state amps.
There's only 1 location in an amplifier circuit where carbons have the edge.
Hi Jacco,
But carbon composition resistors (Allen Bradley) sound better IMHO.
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Old 28th February 2007, 07:48 AM   #7
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I used to do tube gear, a search will find a picture of the great many Allen Bradleys i still have, including a lot of currently high priced biggies.
They don't taste better, though.
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Old 28th February 2007, 11:15 AM   #8
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Mouser carries the RN60D resistors -- I believe that Newark and Allied Electronics used to carry the Allen Bradley "Mod Pots" -- but you can make a really fine stepped attenuator with the RN60's.

for capacitors read Bob Pease's article on "capacitor soakage" -- http://www.national.com/rap/Applicat...570,28,00.html and the article which Jung and Marsh did on picking capacitors:
http://waltjung.org/Classic_Articles.html

my two bits -- I use polystyrene in RIAA filter sections, and have used polystyrene in coupling chipamps to the preamp sections -- i also came across a "lot" of polycarbonate which are very good for sample-hold applications, or as the integrator on a true RMS converter, and as input caps on amps. in the tube stuff i have built -- which means a lot more power supplies -- i have used WIMA's which are sometimes difficult to source in the states -- Future and Mouser carry WIMA but are often out of stock or you have to purchase an entire box.

i still haven't found a surface mount electrolytic that I like -- and I think the SMT ones are difficult to mount for a DIYr -- and don't put a polystyrene cap in the toaster-oven
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Old 28th February 2007, 04:59 PM   #9
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It can't be spoken about the qualities of capacitors and resistors without mentioning the Cyril Bateman's series published in Electronics World around 2002.
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Old 28th February 2007, 07:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by forr
It can't be spoken about the qualities of capacitors and resistors without mentioning the Cyril Bateman's series published in Electronics World around 2002.
Yes, true, but when you bring up EW people start complaining about the editrix and the dearth of content.
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