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Old 11th December 2006, 10:14 PM   #11
anatech is offline anatech  Canada
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Hi sound_prodigy,
Okay, I used to make boards photographically (positives) with great success. I have yet to try the iron on type but am in that process.

Quote:
Sorry about all the questions, but I am new to this and want to make sure I don't screw it up.
Go ahead and make a mistake or two. It's the best way to learn. I understand that you don't want to make any avoidable mistakes. That's okay too.

Quote:
Is the only reason you recomended metal oxide resistors instead of metal film because they are cheaper.
No, they have other attributes. I do not recommend them because metal films cost more. I think they are the best resistor for general purpose use.
Quote:
I thought metal film generated the least amount of noise
That is only important in the input stages of a circuit. The gain is much lower later on, so the noise contribution from a metal oxide is no longer important. They are much quieter than the carbon types they replace. Try not to think in absolutes either. I would tend not to use a metal film in higher power situations.

-Chris
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Old 23rd December 2006, 02:33 PM   #12
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Default Slow and steady...

Okay, I think this is the circuit layout for the back of the board. The board is covered with a blue coating which makes identifying the tracks very difficult. I think I did them all right. However I need to tripple check.
Click the image to open in full size.

Here is a picture of the backside of the board
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 23rd December 2006, 11:57 PM   #13
anatech is offline anatech  Canada
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Hi sound_prodigy,
You've done some very good work there! Make some of the other traces wider, similar to the original board. Get another pair of eyes to check your work to be safe.

-Chris
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Old 24th December 2006, 12:12 AM   #14
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Default Re: Slow and steady...

Quote:
Originally posted by anatech
You've done some very good work there! Make some of the other traces wider, similar to the original board. Get another pair of eyes to check your work to be safe.

-Chris
Chris, if this guy can reverse eng that board and get a duplicate running, well, I'm going to retire! That is great work and very tedious compared to the Crown DC300A.

Send me a BIG jpeg and I'll have a look if you want a second opinion? Did you use photoshop? Nice to see this progressing.

Cheers,

Shawn.
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Old 24th December 2006, 12:23 AM   #15
anatech is offline anatech  Canada
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Hi Shawn,
That's a very nice offer on your part.

What I would do given the chance is replicate the 2500 amp PCB's and install those in a 510 chassis. May as well upgrade once you've done this much work. Same power but a newer design using the same heatsink assembly.

-Chris
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Old 24th December 2006, 12:48 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally posted by anatech
[B]Hi Shawn,
That's a very nice offer on your part.
I nailed the DC300A on the first shot. Other than the squealing and popping(which I got solutions for at the end) I had not one glitch. I'm very happy with my result. This amp could...will sound better than the original if prodigy has the time to work it out.

Quote:
What I would do given the chance is replicate the 2500 amp PCB's and install those in a 510 chassis. May as well upgrade once you've done this much work. Same power but a newer design using the same heatsink assembly.
-Chris
Do you have a 2500 PCB lying around or are you just teasing? Heck, the fella is half way there? Let's keep him on track?

Shawn.
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Old 24th December 2006, 01:47 AM   #17
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I made the layout with a program called "Sprint-Layout 5.0," only it was a Demo that wouldn't allow me to save or print. So I took a screen shot, then used photoshop to make it black and white.

Here are the large pictures (Click "Download File" at the top of the page")
http://s29.quicksharing.com/v/1158894/1PCB.zip.html


according to the schematic these are the parts that I need. Is mouser the best place for these?
Click the image to open in full size.

*Capacitors are in MFD 10%* I still need to take note of which ones are polarized.

*Resistors are in ohms 1/4watt 5%*
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Old 24th December 2006, 02:50 AM   #18
anatech is offline anatech  Canada
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Hi sound_prodigy,
Quote:
Is mouser the best place for these?
I don't remember clearly, but I think I got a great selection of metal oxide resistors from either Newark or Digikey.

I love Digikey's shipping and Newark's isn't bad either. Keep in mind that the original factory parts were matched. Therefore you need to buy more than one of each for each pair. I'd recommend 5 minimum, to 10. I would typically buy 20 of each, so watch the discounts!! Sometimes the breakpoint may be as little as 5, commonly 10 or 25 (at 25 forget it unless they are cheap small ones). You will use the other parts in projects in the future. Try to use On Semi if you have a choice. ST are okay too. They may be your only choice.

Shawn,
I have a 2500 sitting here waiting for insulation material so I can finish it.

-Chris
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Old 24th December 2006, 03:09 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by sound_prodigy
according to the schematic these are the parts that I need. Is mouser the best place for these?
For this particular amp, if I could get the board working, I would use "boutique" resistors, low ESR electrolytic (they have +/_ and those are polarized) and silver mica caps (like the brownish russet colored ones on your board) for the rebuild.

Before I got that far I may be inclined to stuff a new board with more cost effective parts to debug it. A dual layer PCB may need a revision or two before you get it the way you want.

On the high end I would use Holco or PRP name brand resistors like the ones Parts Connection sell but you should be able to get them at other places too.

The values of the silver mica caps are critical to the amps performance from the original spec. If you find that some of the transistors are no longer available there may be a need to adjust some values of these caps depending on/what substitute transistors you may use.

On Semi is an easy grab for transistors. You can sample up to 5 pcs each on multiple line items if you are willing to pick up the shipping tab, around $15 US.

Digikey shipping into the Canada has the fastest ship method and the lowest $$. Duty is automatically factored into their Canadian shipments.

I've just been advised recently that Panasonic FM electrolytic caps from Digikey are cheap, low ESR and available.

I hope that helps. I printed the board image on glossy high rez and held it up into the light like an x-ray; the only areas that raise concern are included in the attached. You may find if you have a desk lamp, it is good to place the PCB very close to the light bulb and study the trails.

Cheers,

Shawn.

edit: typos
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Old 24th December 2006, 03:33 AM   #20
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Most of the caps on your bill of material indicated by pF could be silver mica, shoot for 5% or 2% tolerance. 100V or 200V is typical.

Use all 1% resistors, non inductive if you can.

Low ESR for the electrolytics.

Many of the .1, .01 & .22 capacitors could be MKP WIMA type caps. Stay above 63V and most of these should be ok unless there is one or two across both rail supply voltages, then 100V or higher is necessary.

Since you have a left and right channel and they are he same PCB, I would be inclined to desolder all of the components from one of these boards, then I would spray it with flux remover and scan it right on your flat bed scanner, top and bottom, then you can e-ray the board image in photoshop by adjusting light levels and hue.

Cheers,

Shawn.
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