3RU/19" Amplifier Front Mask Design - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 9th December 2002, 07:28 PM   #1
djdan is offline djdan  Romania
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Romania
Default 3RU/19" Amplifier Front Mask Design

What do you think about this design ?
Any critics or sugestions are welcome !
Attached Images
File Type: jpg amplifier front mask 3ru.jpg (44.3 KB, 429 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th December 2002, 09:05 PM   #2
Philo is offline Philo  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ever sunny San Diego
Nice looking design. Do you need to have the vents up front? Venting out the sides between the heatsinks lends itself to better cooling, will clean up the front and lower your manufacturing costs.
__________________
Philip
"If you didn't make it with your own two hands, its not really yours".
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th December 2002, 12:32 AM   #3
The one and only
 
Nelson Pass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
It looks quite a bit like 80's BGW design. Are you
familiar with it?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th December 2002, 10:28 AM   #4
djdan is offline djdan  Romania
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Romania
No Mr.Nelson , I don't know the BGW products , but thank you for information.

I like very much huge Vu-Metter with many LED and I saw in a movie a broadcast console with a similar Vu-metter.

I don't know why in our days, people ( or manufacturer , perhaps ) do not like to have any type off controll for their amplifiers.

For Philo ,
Yes I need the vent up front becouse I want to use this design for pro use (cooled by a fan) and the amplifier it would be inserted in a 19" rack.

Thank you for answeres !
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th December 2002, 11:58 AM   #5
yeti is offline yeti  Germany
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Ewersbach
Default amp

Nice meters!
Would be even cooler with blue LED's

Arne
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th December 2002, 12:21 PM   #6
djdan is offline djdan  Romania
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Romania
Yes, but it would be more expensive to manufacture.
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th July 2004, 06:47 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: USA
Send a message via AIM to djsynthesize
Default Very Identical to the 750B

It looks almost exactly like a BGW 750B. The front light arches on the early 750's were all red until midway through 1980, when BGW figured that multicoloured would be better. About the only difference in your amp and the 750B is the gain control knobs on yours are to the side (where the 750B's are underneath the meters) and yours has front cooling vents; and the BGW does not.

I think that the front vents would be good to have on the amp. The design of the BGW has slots that are cut out on the left and right sides of the top cover. The cover only covers the output modules. But actually the top part of the output module is just a heat sink, and the the whole thing mounts on to the top of the chassis. The cover just goes over the modules to act as a directional flow resistor to the outside air comming in. By this I mean, the cover is slotted on the left and right sides (where it covers the side of the modules). There is one single large fan in this amp which draws air from the inside out. The cool air from the outside comes in the slots and travelles along the heat sink to the center when it is sucked through the space between the modules and then exits through the "pusher" fan on the rear panel.

Its actually a great design. In your case, having the vent slots on the faceplate of the amp will be better if the amp is going to be housed in a "tight" rack. -I mean tight with space and air. You could even think about adding a 2nd small fan behind the front panel which could draw the air through the slots and force it into the amp. Then position your output heatsinks (if it is a module design) close to the pathway of the airflow from the front fan, and then to the center of the amp where it could be exhausted through the rear. I have a Renkus Heinz p1500 amp that utilizes almost this same design. But the Renkus Heinz has each channel output secluded on either side of the chassis with a separate fan for each channel. The fans on that amp are real monsters too. Another remarkable cooling design.

The best heat transfer will take place when the amp chassis itself acts as an adibatic system with transfer only from the system as a whole.
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th July 2004, 07:45 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Virginia
Send a message via Yahoo to antness
Quote:
Originally posted by djdan
Yes, but it would be more expensive to manufacture.

You can get 100 blue LEDs on eBay for about $15 shipped!
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What makes an amplifier "bright", "warm", or "neutral"? JohnS Solid State 51 13th December 2009 07:42 PM
FS: very nice RAAL "FlatFoil" ribbon tweeters {NIB }, with custom made front plate yairf Swap Meet 3 2nd June 2009 10:25 AM
Front and delayed rear subs design xplod1236 Subwoofers 2 3rd December 2007 07:44 PM
The "Leap-Frog" Method Of Switching Amplifier Control Loop Design analogspiceman Class D 29 1st December 2006 04:21 PM
suspending a small tweeter in front of woofer for "coaxial" effect? bikehorn Multi-Way 3 2nd January 2006 03:04 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:25 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2