Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 24th October 2002, 06:38 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Denmark
Question Color codes on transformer

Hello everyone,

I got two quite big(600VA - 9 kg) toroidial transformers from an old amplifier but I cant figure out the connections. There is a red and black wire in one side and a blue, orange, yellow, red and grey in the other. The resistance betwen the wires are as follows:

Red-Black = <0,2

Blue-orange = 0,7
orange-yellow = <0,1

red-grey = 0,7

Can anybody tell me what's the primary and the secondary?
I live in an 230V country and was thinking if the "Blue-orange" and the "red-grey" could be connected in series as the primary?
Hope you can help

Best regards
Anders
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th October 2002, 06:46 PM   #2
CryingDragon
Guest
 
No,see if your getting resistance between orange and blue and you connect them you'll short the winding it seems like the 2 windings with the 0.7 resistance are the primaries (dual 120 volt) then 2 less resistances are seconadaries. I'm not sure about the phase connections on the primaries but this is only IMO,Perhaps somebody (peter?) could also lend an opinion??


Edit: Go here: http://www.plitron.com/Pages/Products/Std/schemati.htm
it might help.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th October 2002, 07:34 PM   #3
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
Normally the thinnest wires are the primaries.

To be safe, connect 24 V AC to the asumed 220/230 V winding. Then measure the voltage at the other windings. Multiply the value by 230/24 =9.17-9.58

If you happen to get 24 VAC from a another winding, the transformer has 2 x 110 V primary, the you have to change to multiplication factor.
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Tube Buffered Gainclone in work |Thread || Diamond buffer |Thread for the group buy | Wiki
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th October 2002, 07:40 PM   #4
CryingDragon
Guest
 
not to say your wrong P-A but to multiply it by 230 shouldn't you put 1voltAC into the primary? then when you multipy the output of the secondaries by 230 you get the real value they would output from 230ac and compare it to what it's sopossed to be?? i mean if u put 24 in you should multiply the output by 240/24 or 10? ok dun mind me i was never good at math
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th October 2002, 09:01 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Denmark
[QUOTE]Originally posted by CryingDragon
[B]No,see if your getting resistance between orange and blue and you connect them you'll short the winding it seems like the 2 windings with the 0.7 resistance are the primaries (dual 120 volt) then 2 less resistances are seconadaries. I'm not sure about the phase connections on the primaries but this is only IMO,Perhaps somebody (peter?) could also lend an opinion??


Thank you for the reply!

Well, I think you misunderstood me. What I was thinking of was to connect the orange and red(maybe orange and grey) to get a series connection betwen the two windings. So I guess we agree. The link you provided was just what I was looking for although the colors dont match. I try to connect a low voltage and see what happens
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th October 2002, 04:32 AM   #6
CryingDragon
Guest
 
your welcome best of luck and don't blow too many fuses
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th October 2002, 06:33 AM   #7
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
Quote:
Originally posted by CryingDragon
not to say your wrong P-A but to multiply it by 230 shouldn't you put 1voltAC into the primary? then when you multipy the output of the secondaries by 230 you get the real value they would output from 230ac and compare it to what it's sopossed to be?? i mean if u put 24 in you should multiply the output by 240/24 or 10? ok dun mind me i was never good at math
Sorry, CryingDragon, think really hard. If you lower the voltage, it's safer both for you and the transformer with low test voltage. 230/24 is around 9.58 and I say around. Asuming that you have really have found the primary winding and it's only one, then every other voltage get 9.58 times lower than it would have been if you had connected 230 volts. If you should multiply with 219/24, 223/24, 236/24 or what ever is determined of where you live.
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Tube Buffered Gainclone in work |Thread || Diamond buffer |Thread for the group buy | Wiki
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th October 2002, 06:40 AM   #8
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Anders DK
[B]
Quote:
Originally posted by CryingDragon
No,see if your getting resistance between orange and blue and you connect them you'll short the winding it seems like the 2 windings with the 0.7 resistance are the primaries (dual 120 volt) then 2 less resistances are seconadaries. I'm not sure about the phase connections on the primaries but this is only IMO,Perhaps somebody (peter?) could also lend an opinion??
If you do have 2 x 110/120 volts you know about the "dots"?

Wrong "polarity" in series connection and the transformer will die (if you don't have fuses that is.
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Tube Buffered Gainclone in work |Thread || Diamond buffer |Thread for the group buy | Wiki
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th October 2002, 09:17 AM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Denmark
Quote:
Originally posted by peranders


If you do have 2 x 110/120 volts you know about the "dots"?

Wrong "polarity" in series connection and the transformer will die (if you don't have fuses that is.

And that is the problem that I am facing now(lucky me - Í did use fuses ). Any ideas of how to determine the polarity?
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th October 2002, 09:38 AM   #10
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
The problem you can get is not function at all or function. It's like connecting batteries in series. The windings has always a polarity mark (not always seen). You have two combinations, flip one of the windings.
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Tube Buffered Gainclone in work |Thread || Diamond buffer |Thread for the group buy | Wiki
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Strange resistor color codes Davide82 Parts 5 17th January 2009 09:46 AM
Siemens codes parrot Tubes / Valves 0 21st January 2008 06:02 AM
understanding transformer codes Nanook Tubes / Valves 2 7th March 2006 04:00 AM
Sprague/Cap Color Codes ? Trout Tubes / Valves 4 13th August 2005 04:06 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:42 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2