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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:00 PM   #1
beppe61 is offline beppe61  Italy
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Default Power amps burn-in procedure.

Dear Sirs,


I am gathering information on the best procedure (in terms of speed) to fully burn-in a new power amp.
It would be better to use a square or sinusoidal wave?
I would like to know anyone opinion.

Thank you so much.

Kind regards,

beppe61
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:14 PM   #2
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Sine wave as it stresses the output devices more.
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:18 PM   #3
beppe61 is offline beppe61  Italy
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Quote:
Originally posted by richie00boy
Sine wave as it stresses the output devices more.

Dear Sir,
thank you so much for your extremely kind and valuable reply.
What about the optimum frequency?
100 Hz would be fine?
I think that low frequency would be better for the bigger current involved but maybe I am missing something.
Someone say that a white noise woud be the best.
I prefer the idea of a fixed frequency.
What do you use?

Kind regards,

beppe61
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:30 PM   #4
quasi is offline quasi  Australia
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Default What is the purpose of this "burn in"?

The term "burn in" is used by electronics manufacturers when they stress components to determine reliability. I.e. if a device is said to have been "burnt in" then it has been tested within it's specification and approved for use.

Marketers have stolen this term to confuse customers with terms like "100 hours burn in is required to really appreciate the soundstage of device (amplifier, cable, connector etc.)" This approach has never been proven with objective measurement.

If however you subscribe to this "burn in" make sure it's done into a dummy load as pure square wave (even continous sine wave) will destroy a speaker.

Cheers
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Sine wave as it stresses the output devices more.

Would any explanation follow this strange revelation? Apparently frequency and amplitude are not as important as shape
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:34 PM   #6
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Why not just spend less time worrying about it, and spend the time playing some nice tunes. It will sound better than a sine/square wave anyway.
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:39 PM   #7
beppe61 is offline beppe61  Italy
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Default Re: What is the purpose of this "burn in"?

Dear Sir,

thank you so much for your extremely kind and very precious reply.
Telling me: " make sure it's done into a dummy load as pure square wave (even continous sine wave) will destroy a speaker " you have saved my speakers !!!!
This demonstrate how ignorant I am.
I really was not aware of this effect.
A precisation is due I think.
I quote you: " Marketers have stolen this term to confuse customers with terms like "100 hours burn in is required to really appreciate the soundstage of device (amplifier, cable, connector etc.)" This approach has never been proven with objective measurement".

I have to say that new caps in particular seem ( and I stress seem) to change their properties with time.
I do not whay anyway.
But the effect is quite "audible", do not know if also "measurable".

I quote you again: " [QUOTE]Originally posted by quasi
[B]The term "burn in" is used by electronics manufacturers when they stress components to determine reliability. I.e. if a device is said to have been "burnt in" then it has been tested within it's specification and approved for use."

Do you have any info about the normal procedure used by them?
It would be very interesting to know about it.

Thank you sincerely again.
Kind regards,

beppe61
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:42 PM   #8
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Default Re: What is the purpose of this "burn in"?

Quote:
Originally posted by quasi
The term "burn in" is used by electronics manufacturers when they stress components to determine reliability. I.e. if a device is said to have been "burnt in" then it has been tested within it's specification and approved for use.

Marketers have stolen this term to confuse customers with terms like "100 hours burn in is required to really appreciate the soundstage of device (amplifier, cable, connector etc.)" This approach has never been proven with objective measurement.

If however you subscribe to this "burn in" make sure it's done into a dummy load as pure square wave (even continous sine wave) will destroy a speaker.

Cheers

Indeed, and the clever ploy is that it uses the normal familiarisation period everyone needs to get used to new equipment. During that familiarisation period the perception (not the sound) changes, so many erroneously assume that the burn in changes the sound.

Jan Didden
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:45 PM   #9
beppe61 is offline beppe61  Italy
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Quote:
Originally posted by pinkmouse
Why not just spend less time worrying about it, and spend the time playing some nice tunes. It will sound better than a sine/square wave anyway.
Dear Pinkmouse,

it is always this eternal desire of speed things up and reach the optimum performance for any device.
Anyway, as some dangers are involved in used fixed tones, I really think I wil follow your advice "Just play some nice tunes !".

Thank you very much
kind regards

beppe61
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Old 23rd November 2005, 01:48 PM   #10
beppe61 is offline beppe61  Italy
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Default Re: Re: What is the purpose of this "burn in"?

Quote:
Originally posted by janneman

Indeed, and the clever ploy is that it uses the normal familiarisation period everyone needs to get used to new equipment. During that familiarisation period the perception (not the sound) changes, so many erroneously assume that the burn in changes the sound.
Jan Didden

Dear Mr. Didden,

thank you very much for this interesting opinion.
So burn-in is a sort of psycho-acoustic experience?
Very intriguing idea.
I thought that some components' properties (caps above all) change with time.

Kind regards,

beppe61
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