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Old 21st November 2004, 07:16 AM   #1
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Default Guitar Amp idea. Is this possible??

Hi,

I would like to make a small solid state practice amp for guitar. My plans were to first make a distortion pedal and use that as a pre-amp and then make a power amp and connect the two. The volume/tone/etc would be controlled from the effect pedal circuit. The amp would be powered by 9V battery or DC adapter.

Does this sound possible? If so can someone help guide me in the right direction? I can make the pedal, but I have no idea of how to go about the rest. (schematics, parts needed, etc)

If you need more info let me know. I have already chosen the pedal I would like to use.

Thanks in advance!
Jeff

Guitar Amp idea. Is this possible??
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Old 21st November 2004, 10:45 AM   #2
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why not?
but i would use at least volume pot on power amp
do you want to make a distortion pedal by yourself??
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Old 21st November 2004, 02:51 PM   #3
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I will be making the pedal. I have the schem, parts list and template for the circuit board. Its a pretty simple pedal. Could you recommend a good amp project this would work well with this? I am only looking for a couple of watts. Similar to those Mountain Amps.

Here's the link if you want to check them out.

http://www.amazingtone.com/generic.html?pid=1

Thanks
jeff
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Old 22nd November 2004, 05:03 AM   #4
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
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What you describe could be called a powered speaker.

Sure, no problem. For simplicity look up a TDA2030 (or TDA2040) It is a very common chip used in many practice amps. it will produce up to 30 watts (or 40 watts) if you power it sufficiently. They will work at lower powers too, of course.

These are five legged things that look like a tab top transistor. (TO220 case) The data sheet should include a sample circuit. Very simple to use. One of these, a power supply, and a few resistors and caps, and you have a little power amp. Easy to wire up on a perf board or something. The chip will need a small heat sink unless you keep power very low.

They usually run off split supplies - that is positive and negative supplies, but you can wire it single supply with an output cap for the speaker. Application notes should cover both methods.

You can also select from a pile of single chip low power amps from other vendors. National Semiconductor makes a range of them, and you can get data sheets and application notes from their web site.
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Old 22nd November 2004, 10:04 PM   #5
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well 9V is prety small voltage even for practice
you may try bridge amplifier like this attached
it will give you power as big as nearly 5W of undistorted sine on 4 ohm speaker, but don't expect mesa/boogie sound
Attached Files
File Type: zip 9vbridge.zip (37.7 KB, 35 views)
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Old 22nd November 2004, 10:48 PM   #6
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9 volts is NOT enough for a small guitar amp to hear it very well IMO.

Only gonna get about 2W with a 4ohm speaker, and probably less with a 9V battery.

Use a couple small (1Ah or so) 12V lead acid batteries to get +-12V (24V) and use a 4ohm speaker. Should give you 12W or more with a 4ohm speaker and a strong amp.


I'm planning on making a small guitar/PA/karaoke amp once I find a more efficient 4 ohm speaker.

The amp is already built and uses a small 35V transformer for a single powersupply amp powered by 46V (under full load) and gives me around 50 watts and is nice and loud.

Good luck on your mini amp!
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Old 23rd November 2004, 01:27 AM   #7
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Thanks to all for your feedback. Maybe practice amp wasn't the right term. I'm looking to make a portable amp that does not have to be plugged in. Check out the Mountain amps by clicking on the link of my original post. This is exactly what I'm looking to do but with more distortion.

Keep the info coming. I'm new to this and it's difficult to do research on your own without the aide of forums such as these.

Thanks again
jeff
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