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Old 27th September 2004, 12:10 AM   #1
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Default unkown transistor

I bought a heatsink off Ebay that had 12 transistors still attached but I can't find any info on them. I have already contacted Onsemi and Freescale both had the same response "?".

Here's a pic.
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Old 27th September 2004, 12:45 AM   #2
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The "manufacture" should be Motorola, well, the logo is there.

After a search on google, the only webpage that I see was:
http://www.mailameal.com/dyn/d2002.6...m.heatsink.cms

...but where is the information about this "guys"?? I donīt no...weird
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Old 27th September 2004, 12:52 AM   #3
OliverD is offline OliverD  Germany
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I remember a very old germanium transistor 2N357 I found a large number of in a historic magnetic core memory. Could this be a 2N357 manufactured by Motorola in the 28th week of 1978? Thought the 2N357 was a small-signal type, though.
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Old 27th September 2004, 01:10 AM   #4
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Hi, this unit is circa old, not sure how old though, here's a pic and another of the front in the next post. Those are .05ohm resistors.

Thanks for your help.
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Old 27th September 2004, 01:18 AM   #5
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And the front.

I'm thinking they were used in a high current capacity because of the low ohm resistors and thick traces but it could be an rf module?

I popped the top off one just to see the die size and connecting wires, as if this means anything, well maybe die size means something. The pic is are in the next post.
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Old 27th September 2004, 01:20 AM   #6
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oops
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Old 27th September 2004, 02:34 AM   #7
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
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It sure looks like an audio output stage from something, especially if it has the low resistance ballast resistors.

Those are indeed Moto xstrs, adn that is a date code, but thbe other number is just a house number. It would have been the part number that whoever made the unit used. They order the parts stamped with theit number for use in house. If you contacted Moto witht the number and describe it as a TO3, they might tell you what it was under the skin, but that is proprietaru information. They would knly tell you if the OEM whose number it was was no longer in operation or if the copyrights had expired.

In other words if Marantz contracted Moto to make power xstrs for them, Moto could not reveal to you what they were.

The semi division of Moto is now called On Semiconductors. Moto sold the division off some time ago.

Current popular audio output stages use Moto MJ15xxx types. The MJ15024/15025 [air are rated for high voltages and high currents. 25 years ago we didn't have parts that big 2N3772 or something was a big deal. So those parts could be anywhere from 40V if they were in some car stereo system up to even 200v. And the current could be anything from not much to 30 amps.

Failing info from Moto, try one in a curve tracer somewhere. The nearest electronics engineering program ought to have one if you don't.
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Old 27th September 2004, 11:17 AM   #8
djk is offline djk
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Its power supply stuff, not audio.

I agree with Enzo, they are most likely either 2N3771, 2N3772, or 2N3773 types.

Considering the low, low value of the ballast resistor I would guess they are 2N3771 40V 30A

The bite taken out of the PC board suggests de-milled spares from military stock.
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Old 27th September 2004, 12:12 PM   #9
johnnyx is offline johnnyx  United Kingdom
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I agree with psu stuff, what about an old computer psu, from the days when they were very big and used loads of ttl. I acuired a similar unit, ex-computer, with very high current rectifier and thyristors, again from a computer psu.
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Old 27th September 2004, 05:46 PM   #10
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it is 28 V voltage regulator oh...no...it doesn't exist haha
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