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KT 24th June 2004 03:32 PM

Confused about Rectifier Phases
 
Hi,

Could anyone tell me what's the difference between the various rectification phases?

A while ago I blew a fuse in my preamp and need to replace the rectifier. Turns out it uses a single-phase rectifier (BR-102).

I want to upgrade to a soft recovery FRED-type unit, but don't know if they make these in a single-phase design.

Which leads me to ask: what is single-phase vs. two or three phases?

Is the single-phase design just the standard four diode bridge rectifier? in which case I can use just a standard soft-recovery bridge?

Thanks,
KT

Ouroboros 24th June 2004 03:42 PM

Yes, a simple 4-diode bridge is a single phase rectifier.

A 3-phase bridge is what you are likely to have in your car alternator, and has more than four diodes. You would only need something like this on mains supplies to produce dc from high-power 3-phase mains feeds for industrial power supplies (perhaps for a MIG or TIG welder).

jneutron 24th June 2004 03:46 PM

Re: Confused about Rectifier Phases
 
Quote:

Originally posted by KT
Could anyone tell me what's the difference between the various rectification phases?

A single phase bridge is constructed of four diodes. It has two ac terminals, one negative and one positive terminal.

A three phase bridge has three ac terminals, and is constructed of six diodes.

You can use a 3 phase bridge in place of a single phase one, by using only two of the ac legs. It's capacity will be reduced however, by approximately 1/3rd of the units rating.

Cheers, John


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