Voltage regulator OP249 question - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th May 2004, 01:37 PM   #11
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
It seems to me that they made this strange circuit because of the need to supply the opamp from the +/- supply. The opamp inputs will be at ground potential (+ hardwired, the - because of the design). So, if the pos supply output goes up, the - input goes up, and the opamp regulates the output down. So far, so good, so it looks that it can indeed work - I should have looked at it a bit longer maybe. The output voltages are equal to the zener voltages - if everything works as designed.
The supplies DO influence each other, but that influence is damped by the ratio of the zener dynamic impedance to the 5.6 k resistors (which are a bit high, 1mA through the zeners is a bit low).

If it doesn't work, check that the opamp inputs are both at or close to (few mV) ground.

One check would be to replace the current source by a resistor of, say, 2 or 3 k (and decrease the 2.4k to 100 ohms or so), that should work also. The 2 or 3 k will insert too much current into the pass transistor base, which will be syphoned off by the opamp.

Jan Didden
__________________
If you don't change your beliefs, your life will be like this forever. Is that good news? - W. S. Maugham
Check out Linear Audio!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2004, 02:50 PM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
I'll measure the opamp inputs later today and post the results.

I wonder about the FET because the PCB is marked reversed of the schematics: the Drain and Gate are connected instead of the Source/Gate. I wonder which is right? Presently I followed the schematics. I was thinking of reversing them, but I don't want to blow the transistors since they are hard to find here and it took me 2 weeks to get them.

Mihai
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2004, 03:42 PM   #13
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
Fred,

It does work I think. It looks like a clever way to cope with the limited input range of the opamp; here both inputs are at ground level, which of course is nicely in the middle of the supply range. The opamp output series R does the same to keep the opamp output inside the supply envelope. The other polarity is used to bias the zeners, so you need no output attenuator resistors to set the output level; the zener voltage IS the output voltage. It's creative, to say the least. Took me some time to look through it. Do you see it?

Jan Didden
__________________
If you don't change your beliefs, your life will be like this forever. Is that good news? - W. S. Maugham
Check out Linear Audio!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2004, 04:09 PM   #14
diyAudio Retiree
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Spain or the pueblo of Los Angeles
Default Right after postting that dawned on me!

After looking at it a few times........( first couple made me think someone made a mistake drawing it) The circuit is a unity gain volt regulator with 5 V zener references. Instead of referring the Zeners to ground and the noninverting input, they are referred to the output. The circuit is still a classic unity gain feedback regulator but with the output voltage shifted by the zener voltage so that both inputs of the op amp are at ground instead of 5 volts. This biasing of the Zeners of the other polarity regulator output gives the Zeners a cleaner bias source and the regulator a better PSSR. In a nutshell, they wanted AC unity gain for the regulators with a common mode voltage within the acceptable range for the op amp. It is definitely a tail waging the dog circuit, but the design is intentional. The zeners should have about 5 ma through them for low noise and dynamic impedance. The bias resistor to the other output is around 1K ohms. the circuit could be easily improved with more zener noise filtering.

The 30 minute editing limit gave me the chance to look stupid but I won't ask the moderators to delete the first one. This is definitely different than any way I have seen the refence voltages done but
was definitely done for unity gain feedback and a good common mode
voltage. maybe it will come in handy some day.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2004, 11:32 PM   #15
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
I took your advice (thanks) and replaced the 5.6k resistors for 1k (993ohm) and the output raised to 4.6v. It's almost good enough.

I also changed the 2.4k resistors for 100ohm and this had no apparent effect on the output. Measured the voltage on the inputs of the opamp and got 0.1mV on one side 0.4mV. Looks good.

I wonder how to get the last .5V out of this thing. The zeners are 5.1v 5% so the lowest I should get is 4.85v.

I may try a lower value for the bias resistor maybe about 600ohms?
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th May 2004, 12:52 PM   #16
diyAudio Retiree
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Spain or the pueblo of Los Angeles
I wonder how to get the last .5V out of this thing.

Find out what output voltages of the op amps are. You probably should try a 9 Volt zener (or 8 to 10 volt) it isn't critical. If the saturated drain current value (Id at Vgs = zero) of the K246 current sources across the 2.4 K resistor to the op amp output gives too much voltage drop, the op amp will run out of output swing. For instance the op275 will only swing within a couple of volts from the rail. For an Ids of 6.5 mA (the top of the GR bias range for the 2SK246) the op amp output is sitting around -10 volts. A high impedance like a 2.4K resistor is also degrading the regulator output impedance and a zener will work much better.

Unless you are getting the actual zener voltage at the regulators output it is not in regulation. Measure the zeners at the expected current levels out of the regulator circuit and note the values.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th May 2004, 01:01 PM   #17
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
If you take 5.6 volts and put through a smaller current you may get 5.0 volts but this is a typical tolerance thing. You have to have 10, maybe more zeners and match them with the current you plan to have. +- 5% and with different current than for what the tolerance is given may give you +- 10-15 % in your case, maybe even more..

If you have 1 mA through the zener I think 5.6 volts will be a good choice but I'll suspect that more current is better. Use as much current as you can "afford" when it comes to power dissipation and how much load you have got. 5-10 mA is good values I think.
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th May 2004, 01:11 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Git a reply from China: (relevant text)

----start---
The polarity of K246 please insert like the white silk screen components outline show on the pcb.

The voltage output only -3.74 or other is too low, change the K246 to K246GR, if the voltage is stil un-normal you can change the fet to zener diode.

The pcb of the DAC38 is fully tested and working good.
Hope it may solve your problem.

----end---


As I mentioned before the K246 is marked on PCB as reversed from schematics - Drain/Gate connected together instead of Source/Gate.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th May 2004, 01:31 PM   #19
diyAudio Retiree
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Spain or the pueblo of Los Angeles
Exclamation Befor I was rudely interupted How about an hour edit window?

"I wonder how to get the last .5V out of this thing."

Find out what output voltages of the op amps are. If the saturated drain current value (Id at Vgs = zero) of the K246 current sources across the 2.4 K resistor to the op amp output, gives too much voltage drop, the op amp will run out of output swing.

For instance the op275 will only swing within a couple of volts from the rail. For an Ids of 6.5 mA (the top of the GR bias range for the 2SK246) the op amp output is sitting around -10 volts. With a 12 volt supply for the op amp you are sitting in the forbidden zone. That's one of the dangers looking at just a schematic, I will bet that a warning about this was in any article that might have accompanied the schematic. At the least, I bet a Y bias group (1.2 to 3 mA) was specified for the 2SK246. The Y bias group would have
also given the highest output impedance for the fet which is desirable for use as a CCS. A high impedance like a 2.4K resistor between the transistor base and op amp output, is degrading the regulator output impedance and a zener will work much better here for low impedance and control of DC voltage at the output of the op amp. You probably should try a 9 Volt zener (or 8 to 10 volt) it isn't critical.

Unless you are getting the actual zener voltage at the regulators output it is not in regulation. Measure the zeners at the expected current levels out of the regulator circuit and note the values.

I hope this is making it clear that the part values come from somewhere before magically appearing on the schematic. The schematic is an snapshot of where the thing wound up after the design was finished. See why there is a space for Revision Number on a formal schematic? Changes to a design almost always occur after the first schematic. Writing the dreaded Engineering Change Order is usually sufficient punishment for mistakes that are carelessness or a lack of foresight by the designer, unless you are writing to fix someone else's mistake, which is often the case.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th May 2004, 01:33 PM   #20
diyAudio Member
 
jan.didden's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Great City of Turnhout, Belgium
Blog Entries: 7
The easiest way to get exactly (more or less) 5V is to replace the zeners with floating integrated 5V references. Search the sites of Analog Devices, LTI, Texas etc, there's tons of them. They are more accurate and have better (lower) dynamic impedance than zeners which means better regulator performance.

For example, the ADR550 will beat the hell out of any zener regulated supply.

Jan Didden
__________________
If you don't change your beliefs, your life will be like this forever. Is that good news? - W. S. Maugham
Check out Linear Audio!
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Novice Voltage Regulator Question slor Tubes / Valves 39 19th January 2008 07:12 PM
Tell me your experience with OP249 serenella Chip Amps 0 25th December 2007 02:19 AM
Newbie voltage regulator question imperfectcircle Solid State 3 25th February 2007 04:37 PM
Voltage regulator help! kasra Solid State 7 23rd November 2002 03:07 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:19 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2