Krell KSA-200B Bias - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Gallery Wiki Blogs Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th May 2016, 04:09 AM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Default Krell KSA-200B Bias

Just picked up a Krell KSA-200B. What a monster!!

Anyways it seems to be running "cool" at about 120F. All the talk states the unit should be running pretty toasty. This is definitely not the case especially when compared to my Threshold 400A i just rebiased to 55C.

I sent an email to Krell about the temperature and the concern about the unit being underbiased. They responded stating 120F sounds about right cause the unit was fairly low bias. Of note I have to say Krell has even great about responding to my several emails.

I found a schematic/service manual for all KSA/KMA models showing appropriate voltages and bias. The manual states all models should be set to 325mV. This raises two questions-

1) does the bias setting add up to 200 WPC class A? I read the article at stereotimes about the KSA-250 and calculating class A watts. If I use that calculation then I'm no where near 200 with 9 output pairs per channel.

2) anybody have experience with this amp to know how hot the heat sinks get?

I plan on opening the amp up to check bias myself but I don't feel like lugging this 150lb beast to the bench quite yet. I wanted to ask around cause there are few threads about bias level on these KSA amps (Did see some info that the KSA-100 had bias set to 500mV).

Thanks for the help
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2016, 02:28 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
mrshow4u's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
In of itself, "325mV" is a meaningless term.

325mV is part of an equation that will get you to your answer. Also I'd stay away from any bias procedure where the temperature at some location is the target. The temperature at any particular location will be a function of dissipation and ambient temperature and airflow.
To calculate what each transistor is dissipating, you can sample the idle current through it by measuring the voltage across each transistors emitter resistor, then dividing that voltage by the emitter resistor's value. That will get you the current. To find the power, while idling, of each transistor, multiply each transistor's current by the voltage across the Emitter and Collector.

325(mV)/0.15(Ohms)= 2.1(A), 325(mV)/0.47(Ohms)=691(mA)
If the rails are low-ish, 2.1(A)*40(Volts) = 86(Watts) per device, 691(mA)*40(Volts) = 27(Watts) per device.. If this amp does not have forced cooling, given time, it will exceed 120 deg (F), I believe. I'd check the bias values. Make sure all of the emitter resistors are not open and all have a similar voltage drop across them.
__________________
".........These go to eleven"

Last edited by mrshow4u; 18th May 2016 at 02:31 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2016, 05:32 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Thanks for the help. I have attached the service manual and schematic I have obtained.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrshow4u View Post
In of itself, "325mV" is a meaningless term.
I agree. I should have been a little more specific. The emitter resistor value is 1 ohm, rail voltage is 77, and number of transistors is 36.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrshow4u View Post
325mV is part of an equation that will get you to your answer. Also I'd stay away from any bias procedure where the temperature at some location is the target. The temperature at any particular location will be a function of dissipation and ambient temperature and airflow.
To calculate what each transistor is dissipating, you can sample the idle current through it by measuring the voltage across each transistors emitter resistor, then dividing that voltage by the emitter resistor's value. That will get you the current. To find the power, while idling, of each transistor, multiply each transistor's current by the voltage across the Emitter and Collector.

325(mV)/0.15(Ohms)= 2.1(A), 325(mV)/0.47(Ohms)=691(mA)
If the rails are low-ish, 2.1(A)*40(Volts) = 86(Watts) per device, 691(mA)*40(Volts) = 27(Watts) per device.. If this amp does not have forced cooling, given time, it will exceed 120 deg (F), I believe. I'd check the bias values. Make sure all of the emitter resistors are not open and all have a similar voltage drop across them.
Based on the stated bias (325mV), rail voltage (77V)emitter resistor value (1 ohm), and number of output traunsistors (36), I get this equation:

325(mV)/1(Ohms)= 325(mA)
325(mA)*77(Volts) = ~25(Watts) per device
25(Watts)*36(Devices) = ~900(Watts) consumption at idle

Based on my minimal understanding of class A being extremely inefficient the 200WPC is a little high for the 900(Watts) dissipation.

If I use the equation from the review by Atkinson (stereotimes) in regards to calculating true class A watts I get this:

If assuming 200 WPC:
Using equation: sqrt(WPC/2*speaker Ohm)
sqrt(200/2*8) = 3.54A

then using: Amperege/transistor pairs per channel
3.54/9 = 393mA

393mA = 393mV given 1(Ohm) resistor value

Based on that the voltage change across the resistor should be higher than the spec. Of course I am assuming the equation is an accurate estimate.

If it is and I reverse the equation given the 325mV bias I would get only ~137 WPC in class A.

I have left the unit on for several hours and I think the highest it has gone is around 130F. Ultimately I plan on setting the bias (not by temp ) and checking various components. I just find this stuff very interesting and enjoy learning about how these amps work.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2016, 07:07 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
mrshow4u's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Yeah, I think that the Class A output may be up to some output power, but not all the way up to 200W into 8 Ohms. That's just a guess on my part.

Do you have any AC line measurement device, like a Kill-A-Watt plug in thingie? You might be able to use something like that, without lugging the whole thing to a bench, to get an idea of current draw and power dissipation.

Thanks for the Atkinson method of determining full Class A. I remember how the Levinson ML-2 would pull >3A from the wall (@120VAC) idling, then make a slight dip in current draw at clipping. That amp was 25 Watts into 8 Ohms, and mono. ....But it did 50 Watts into 4 Ohms, 100 Watts into 2 Ohms all in Class A. That's another aspect of Class A, is the load has an affect of how Class A it is. The lower the load impedance, the higher the bias needs to be to maintain full bias for the full voltage swing, so there may be "grades" of Class A too.
__________________
".........These go to eleven"
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2016, 07:29 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
I don't have an AC line measurement. Been meaning to get one cause it would be useful for a few amps I have worked on. Previous threads have stated it pulls 14A at idle.

Talking about the doubling down with lower impedance probably gets out of my understanding of class A. I have heard some people say that is the case while I have read a couple articles stating this is not a function of Class but the power supply. Per them Class A should be cut in half as impedance drops. Can't say I know which is correct. I do know that they way Krell adertises they make it sound like these (Class A and doubling down of watts) as two separate things.

I also found this post while diging through DIY which backs up my thoughts. Maybe this person will chime in and provide a little more insight:

"No, it is not.

The KSA-200 is biased at 325mV across the 1R emitter resistors, 325mA per power transistor. (Krell issued number, btw)
The power amp has 3 blocks of 6 TO-3's per channel, 18 times 325mA makes 5.85A.

That is a little over half the nominal continuous power in class A, or 274W peak.
(the last bit of quiescent current doesn't count, as one enters the cross-over region there)
Full 200W class A would require at least 3.5 amp quiescent current, with 75Vdc loaded rails that equates to some 550W dissipation per channel.
Even at half the nominal continuous power in 8 ohm in class A, the heatsinks of the KSA-200 are underdimensioned.
Most of the time, they were running well over 140F.

Most serial manufacture class A power amps that have been produced were only part biased.
Only FULL class A biased Krell models are the KSA-50, KSA-100, and KMA models. (till 1990-1991, when Krell went bias hopping)"
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th May 2016, 08:02 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
mrshow4u's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Hmmmm... Yeah, if it pulls 14A (@120VAC), then you're looking at a 1680 Watt space heater. Even if it is large, which I'm sure it is, I'd expect the properly biased and working unit to rise above 130 deg. F. I don't know, maybe not? But that's portable space heater territory.
__________________
".........These go to eleven"
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th May 2016, 04:12 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Another thing to add, if I do the same calculation with the KSA-80B (6 transistor pairs) I only get 60WPC which is a bit less than the claimed 80WPC that is advertised.

Given that many people on multiple forums have stated these KSA models were the only true full class A Krells produced, I find it hard to believe I am getting the correct numbers.

At this point I feel that maybe either the bias value is incorrect (unlikely given the schematic) or the calculation is off(I have no idea?).
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th May 2016, 11:01 AM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
jacco vermeulen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: At the sea front, Rotterdam or Curaçao
Send a message via Yahoo to jacco vermeulen
The heatsinks of the 200B are identical to the ones of other Krell models of that era, e.g. the dynamically biased KSA-250.

In those days, it was a high performance heatsink, sizes something in the order of 7'' W x 5'' D x 6'' H.
At ambient temperature of 25C/77F, it handles less than 100W for a heatsink temperature of 50C/122F, but Krell liked to bias to frying temperature level.
(one reason they often required a repair job, Krells are Hot Rod amps)

The 200B has 6 heatsinks.
For 900W of total idle dissipation, each heatsink would handle 150W.
At 150W dissipation, temperature of the heatsink would be over 160F.

Only possible conclusion : the bias numbers you posted are not correct


(anyone who has ever built a single power amplifier, class A or class AB, can tell from just a mere glance at the heatsink, that it's not able to handle 150W dissipation)
__________________
President Dwayne Camacho says you should drink Brawndo : It's got electrolytes
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th May 2016, 03:09 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacco vermeulen View Post
The heatsinks of the 200B are identical to the ones of other Krell models of that era, e.g. the dynamically biased KSA-250.

In those days, it was a high performance heatsink, sizes something in the order of 7'' W x 5'' D x 6'' H.
At ambient temperature of 25C/77F, it handles less than 100W for a heatsink temperature of 50C/122F, but Krell liked to bias to frying temperature level.
(one reason they often required a repair job, Krells are Hot Rod amps)

The 200B has 6 heatsinks.
For 900W of total idle dissipation, each heatsink would handle 150W.
At 150W dissipation, temperature of the heatsink would be over 160F.

Only possible conclusion : the bias numbers you posted are not correct


(anyone who has ever built a single power amplifier, class A or class AB, can tell from just a mere glance at the heatsink, that it's not able to handle 150W dissipation)
Thanks for the information. I am definitely now wondering what is the correct bias level for this amp although it is tough to believe the manual is wrong. I have contacted Krell and their tech (has worked there for 10 years) had never seen the manual. He passed it along to the engineer who supposidely helped design the amp. He had previously stated the amp was underbaised at that around 120F was about correct.

So I am definitely getting lots of different answers to this whole thing. What I do know is that if the calculations I made are correct (no one has said otherwise) then the 325mV is too low even for the Krell KSA-80 and should be around 390mV.

I have found that if I leave the amp at idle for about 30 minutes is does get a bit hotter (as epxected) but at best I would say around 130-135F.

One question I do have is how you came to the 900W dissipation? I haven't check how much current my amp is actually pulling but is that the epected number. I have seen quite a few different values for the current draw on these amps.

Bottomline is I have to pull the cover off and test a few things. Just dragging my feet cause I have a few other amps I am working on currently and this thing weighs a ton!

Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th May 2016, 03:21 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
As I was typing the previous post Krell had responded to my email. They state the bias should actually be 300mV. . Am I correct in thinking there is no way this is right and stil get 200WPC class A.

My thoughts now are that Krell was having issues with the amp at such high heat and bias level that they are recommending a lower bias?

Here is an interesting quote I found:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ACTIVA View Post
Hi David,

I used to own the Krell KSA250 with matching KRC2 for more than 10 years before I sold them off in 2005. The KSA150 / 250 are /were similar in sound qualities. In terms of subjective performance, The 150 is a little darker compare with 250, and the 250 had a better drive, slightly more transparence and dynamic capability.

Do take note the KSA150 / 250 were not pure class A biased design like the earlier KSA 80/80B/ KMA160 etc. The 150 / 250 operates in pure class A at up to about 20% of the rated output, ie, 50 watts pure "A" for the 250 and the rest of the output power range in enriched class AB operation. Hence the smaller heatsinks compare with the 80/80B/200B etc. I was told this quasi Class "A" biasing scheme was a last minute decision from Dan D' Agostino as to improve the field reliability issues on the KSA200 / KMA400.

The 80/80B/200/200B were pure class A designs and runs hot. Due to the relative inadequate heat sinkings (No force convection / Fans as the older KSA50/100 etc) the KSA200 / KMA400 did developed field reliability problems and were replaced by the KAS 150 / 250 MDA300 / 500 in a relative short time latter.

The KSA80 / KSA200 / KMA160 were more romantic / sweeter soundings but less transparence and less dynamic compare with the later KSA150 /250 /MDA300 /500 series.

Martin Collom rated the KSA250 a little better than the KMA160 in Hi Fi News / RR in a 1992 review article, AFAIK. BTW I bought the KSA250 before the review.

Hope the information is useful for you.

Regards
Max
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
KSA 200B - E-Bay sort of DOA amper Solid State 0 21st June 2010 03:33 AM
Ksa 200B ingemar Solid State 3 3rd April 2009 07:55 AM
Krell KSA-250 bias adjust willcycle Solid State 0 14th September 2007 10:39 PM
Krell KSA 250 bias willcycle Solid State 3 26th October 2003 06:02 PM
Bias adjustment for Krell KSA 100 Alex helge Solid State 9 26th August 2003 02:41 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 06:56 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2016 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2
Wiki