300-800W 8Ohm Sub Amplifier - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 21st January 2004, 11:32 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Athens
Default 300-800W 8Ohm Sub Amplifier

Hello to all,
greetings from Athens!

i am constructing a subwoofer ... i have bought a dual coil 8Ohm 1200W Sub 12"
and i am looking for an amplifier for this bomb ;-)


can you propose me any project or any schematic?

something between 400-800W would be optimal or not?


thanks for your help!!

Im glad im here!
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 06:58 AM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Workhorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Arrow Commentable Thoughts

CHECK THIS OUT!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg npnamp.jpg (62.3 KB, 1523 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 08:12 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Athens
Click the image to open in full size.

CHECK THIS OUT!!

any proposes?
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 11:45 AM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Workhorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Default Commentable Thoughts

TO get 1200WRMS @ 8 ohms u can bridge my schematic amp
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 09:47 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Athens
Great Amp..
but what about the dual voice coil of that Subwoofer??

i have read this on the web:

Quote:

Dual Voice Coil Subwoofers

Dual voice coil subwoofers are becoming a popular choice among car audio enthusiasts who want more flexibility in wiring their sound systems. While typical subwoofers have a single voice coil, dual voice coil (DVC) subwoofers use two separate voice coils, each with its own connections, mounted on one cylinder, connected to a common cone.

The key difference between single and dual voice coil subwoofers is the multiple wiring options DVC subs offer:
Parallel: A dual 4-ohm voice coil subwoofer with its coils wired in parallel presents a 2-ohm load to your amplifier. Since an amplifier produces more wattage at a lower impedance, the parallel connection ensures you'll get the most output from your amp. In the same fashion, if you have a stereo amplifier and two DVC subs, wire both subs for 2-ohm impedance (one per channel) for maximum output.


Series: Series wiring lets you configure multiple woofers to one amplifier at an acceptable impedance. Wire both coils in series for an 8-ohm impedance, and then wire two 8-ohm subs together in parallel for 4-ohm total impedance (perfect for most 2-channel amps bridged to mono operation). Another example: if you have a high-powered 2-channel amplifier, wire four 8-ohm subs per channel (each channel sees a 2-ohm load).


Independent: You can wire each voice coil to a separate channel of your amplifier, if you prefer not to bridge your amp. Independent wiring is a nice option if you're wiring two DVC subs to a 4-channel amplifier one voice coil per channel.

DVCs and high-performance amplifiers
Some amplifiers are designed with an unregulated power supply these amps are favored by mobile audio competitors for their superior performance. An unregulated amp's power increases dramatically when it sees a lower impedance load. For example, an amplifier that produces 75 watts RMS x 2 channels at 4 ohms would double its power to 150 watts x 2 with a 2-ohm load. DVC subwoofers (particularly the dual 2-ohm models) give you the flexibility to wring every bit of power out of this type of amplifier.

Also, if you choose to add an unregulated amp as a power upgrade to your existing DVC subwoofer system, you can simply rewire your subs for optimum impedance. Remember that most car amps are stable down to 2 ohms in normal operation, and to 4 ohms in bridged mode. It's important to check your amp's manual for its operating parameters before hooking up a DVC sub wired for low impedance!

A DVC sub offers the same performance whether it's wired in series or parallel. Its power handling levels, frequency response, and other specifications do not change the only difference is the impedance presented to the amplifier. As a result, you'll use the enclosure that's recommended for your sub, no matter how it's wired.
one of this amp in each coil ??
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 09:50 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Athens
i think this image will help

Click the image to open in full size.

great subwoofer ;-) i love it
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 10:33 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Ultima Thule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Koskenkorva Land
Ampman...

What does the word/name "Miller" say to you?
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd January 2004, 11:33 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Athens
what about if i wire it for 2Ohm impedance?


Click the image to open in full size.


i think it is better to reach 1200W without monster amplifiers..
do you agree?

is there anything wrong with that?
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd January 2004, 12:34 AM   #9
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Send a message via MSN to SkinnyBoy
Quote:
Originally posted by KostasTheGreat
Click the image to open in full size.

CHECK THIS OUT!!

any proposes?

looks pretty crap to me.. I wouldn't bother with anything more than about 200watts...
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd January 2004, 02:45 AM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Easyamp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: United states
I agree with skinnyboy, sub's with lot's of flare usually have more attention paid to how they look then how they sound. Also power ratings are useless unless a duration of the power rating is included, sustained, 100ms, 10ms, etc.

You might be better off starting with something a bit more respected like some peerless xls's or at least some good dayton woofer's.

As for design flexibility, if your not a mass market installer (best buy, circiut city, blah blah) you should build your system to fit your needs.

And don't forget, that to make your system sound twice as loud you must have an increase of a factor 10. (+10 dB)

If you double the power (+3 dB), you will only be able to detect a slight increase in volume. 2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512watts etc and for each step you will notice a slight increase in volume but 10watts to 100watts would effectively double the output power of 10 watts.

So shoot for a more efficient system and not a power hungry animal.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Simple, powerful (100W-200W into 8ohm) amplifier schematic needed ddog Solid State 15 11th July 2013 12:04 PM
Intrest Check: 120w @ 8ohm Tube Buffered LM3875 Amplifier rhysh Chip Amps 192 16th March 2013 04:19 PM
Kenwood KM-207 - 200 Watts x 2/8ohm - power amplifier - $100 + shipping zobsky Swap Meet 0 29th March 2009 11:00 PM
audiofonics 800w 2channel subwoofer amplifier DXPLICIT Car Audio 2 27th August 2007 04:15 PM
Sanity check - designing my speaker to be 8ohm amplifier friendly. owdi Multi-Way 4 1st November 2005 11:08 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:39 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2