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Old 18th January 2004, 10:37 AM   #1
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Arrow What is an amplifier??

NOTE:The Brain of Ampman is formatted by someone.
Therefore all the data is lost.
For the time being,


PLZ Tell the ampman what is meant by the term amplifier??









Until we may have found a backup drive to recover the data??
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Old 18th January 2004, 12:09 PM   #2
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Something that has an energy source, and an input and an
output, the input controlling the output in some way and the
energy output being larger than the energy input.

A lever is not an amplifier. A throttle / gas pedal on a car is.

sreten.
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Old 18th January 2004, 02:21 PM   #3
osey is offline osey  England
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A system where the output is proportional in some way to the input.

Not neccessarily always an increase.

Ax=Y.
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Old 18th January 2004, 02:37 PM   #4
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According to the Oxford dictionary an amplifier is "an appliance
for amplifying"
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Old 19th January 2004, 02:24 AM   #5
djk is offline djk
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Amplifier = straight wire + gain

http://www.diyvideo.com/forums/attac...?postid=294591

Amplifiers usually split their gain into two areas: voltage and current.

In the above diagram the transfomer provides the voltage gain, the transistors the current gain. It runs in class A.
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Old 19th January 2004, 02:38 AM   #6
matjans is offline matjans  Netherlands
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oxford advanced learner's dictionary says this:

amplifier: a device for amplifying sth, esp sounds or radio signals.

amplify: 1 to increase sth in strength or intensity, esp sound; 2 to add details to a story

Lets hope the big chip manufacturers & others overlook the second meaning of 'amplify'.
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Old 19th January 2004, 02:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by djk
In the above diagram the transfomer provides the voltage gain, the transistors the current gain. It runs in class A.
I prefer the 2nd kind: transistors for voltage gain and transformers for current gain.
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Old 19th January 2004, 07:09 AM   #8
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Matjans,

you obviously have a different version of the Oxford dictionary,
although the differences are not big. In my version amplifier is
defined as I stated above, while the applicable one of the
definitions for "amplify" is "increase the strength of (voltage,
current etc.)"

It seems my version (3rd edition, 1985 revision) takes a more
strict and technical view, while your version is more in line
with general language usage.

Anyway, I suppose we are mostly interested in the technical
definition of the term here, not what a dictionary says. My
previous post was partially meant as a joke, since I wasn't
sure if the original question was seriously meant, and if
it was, it might easily lead to an endless philosophical discussion.


All,
I don't expect people to come to an agreement on this term.
For instance, does an amplifier have to amplify at all, or can
we also consider degenerate cases which actually has a gain
less than 1 for both current and voltage?

We certainly do not require a gain >1 for both current and
voltage, since otherwise neither a follower nor a CB stage could
be considered to amplify.
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Old 19th January 2004, 07:55 AM   #9
osey is offline osey  England
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I think people are missing the point here, that amplifiers do not have to be restricted to descriptions of current and voltage?

Think of an amplifier as just a ssystem block with constant gain, with an input, and an output. Thats all there is really.
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Old 19th January 2004, 08:13 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by osey
I think people are missing the point here, that amplifiers do not have to be restricted to descriptions of current and voltage?

Think of an amplifier as just a ssystem block with constant gain, with an input, and an output. Thats all there is really.
Quite right, it is a system block, not necessarily an electric one.
However, that makes it even harder to define what is and what
isn't an amplifier. Is it required to be linear even in the ideal
case for instance? Mathematically it is a function from one or
several variables to one or several variables with certain
characteristics, but which ones? I suppose systems theory
has some general definition of the concept though.

We are getting more and more into the philosophical discussion
I anticipated, so the question is, what was the purpose and
ramifications of the original question?
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