Types of transistors pnp npn? - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11th June 2013, 09:58 PM   #11
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Völkermarkt
Read this and google some more, before you destroy your audio source with DC.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th June 2013, 10:53 PM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
i dont even know how to hook the speaker up to the transistor leads or which leads the power supply goes to....
is there a way someone could draw a simple diagram showing where each positive and negative lead goes to the transistors? where each individual wire goes? speaker wires to transistor leads input and whatnot? power supply is most important to me and safe the input from DC by using 1uF capacitor? i've searched google for months trying to find something like this but all i find are too simplified push pull amp diagrams that never show which wire even goes where..

Last edited by realflow100; 11th June 2013 at 11:04 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2013, 10:29 AM   #13
diyAudio Member
 
KatieandDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: UK
I don't mean this to sound rude, but do you have any idea what an amplifier is ? It's certainly not just a case of connecting a supply to a transistor and then a speaker. If you go to the http://sound.au.com/tcaas/ site and have a look at some of the BASIC class A amplifiers, you will get a better understanding of how an amplifier works.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2013, 10:42 AM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
KatieandDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: UK
Or another good read is the Pass website. https://www.passdiy.com/project

Nelson Pass is VERY GOOD at taking amplifiers back to basics and explaining them in simple terms. Take for instance the popular ZEN.. https://www.passdiy.com/project/ampl...-zen-amplifier
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2013, 11:42 AM   #15
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
All medium power and high power BJTs have the collector as the middle lead. This lead is directly attached to the backplate.
To126 are ecb, To220, To247, To264, To3p are all bce
The only exception to this are the >3legged transistors, eg Onsemi's NJL has the collector as the middle lead of the 5lead package, they are becdd

At low current and low voltage, most BJTs will not be damaged by accidentally swapping PNP & NPN, but when swapped at normal operating voltages they can draw very high current and are usually damaged. A mains bulb tester will often protect against this accidental damage.

To92 and Eline come in a wide variety of lead outs, but as far as I have seen, E is never the middle lead.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2013, 01:16 PM   #16
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Dallas
The flow of heat inside a transistor is always toward the collector or drain.
Thus that terminal usually given the largest of the three available choices.
A big metal tab (and middle leg of same), a metal can with one leg welded.
But the other two terminals might be in any order. Check the spec sheet or
use the diode test on your meter to sort it out...

For an NPN: if you were to connect, use, or measure backward, its still NPN!
But inside, the construction is rarely symmetrical. The collector N is a much
bigger N than the emitter N, and may be doped differently as well. The part
might work if you have the N's connected in wrong order, but not very well.
And you are making he wrong end of the transistor get unusually hot...

For small transistors that aren't expected to run hot anyway, there
may be no externally visible difference in size to tip off which terminal
is which. You are even more reliant upon a valid spec sheet to provide
that information.

If you have a meter with an "HFE" test, you will notice the gain in one
orientation is greater than the other.

Last edited by kenpeter; 12th June 2013 at 01:26 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2013, 07:56 AM   #17
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
i know how an amplifier works i've made a ton of them before. single transistor amplifiers to IC chip amps. i just needed to figure out the leads for these two specific transistors
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2013, 12:21 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
jkuetemann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Paris, Ontario
Quote:
Originally Posted by realflow100 View Post
i know how an amplifier works i've made a ton of them before. single transistor amplifiers to IC chip amps. i just needed to figure out the leads for these two specific transistors
Iv'e read a lot of your posts. Based on what I have read I believe you have a lot of learning yet to do. Here's a little bit of information on transistor identification:

If what you have is *ANY* variant of the TO220/TO3P/TO247/TO264 case the leads will always be B-C-E for bipolar transistors when viewing the lettering printed on the device. Any exposed metal on the package will be connected to the collector. Devices with an A or a B before the part number will be the PNP device and letters C or D before the part number will be the NPN device for Japanese types of transistors. Generally devices of A and C will be considered higher frequency devices, and devices of B and D will be lower frequency devices, but that is of little consequence for our purposes here.

If you get devices with a J or a K before the part number you will likely have a MOSFET, or possibly some other type of FET. The letter before the part number indicates the polarity, J for the P-channel and K for the N-channel. The pinout can vary, but most devices are of the switching variety and have a pinout of G-D-S, with the metal of the case being the drain. Audio specific devices of the lateral type will have a pinout of G-S-D with the metal of the case being the source.

Read more on the subject of electronics. Lots more. Also, really make some effort to learn how to read a schematic. They show you how to connect everything, just not as a pictorial. It is the language of this hobby and without it you will have great difficulty moving forward. It would be like aspiring to be a rock star on guitar, but not being able to read music. Hope this has helped even just a little.
__________________
---Jason Kuetemann---
When the student is ready, the master appears.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2013, 12:52 PM   #19
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Thanks JK,
that explanation helps a lot.
Thanks for the patience you are showing in spending time with a beginner, even though he claims otherwise.

I have a saying:
A good Engineer recognises his/her limitations........ and asks for help when they need it.

I have had colleagues who did not think like this, 1 they did not share their knowledge, 2 they never admitted to not knowing. Very dangerous for those who relied on their design integrity.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th October 2013, 05:27 PM   #20
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
i do know how to make a simple single transistor 2 capacitor with 2 resistors amplifier with low wattage from a 5.0 volt power supply that is no problem for me but anything more get's confusing as to not knowing which wire goes to which lead
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Amplifier NPN+PNP Transistors Tester Circuit lineup Solid State 4 1st March 2013 03:17 PM
Matched PNP/NPN dual transistors carlmart Solid State 31 25th January 2012 10:36 PM
PNP NPN Complimentary Transistors dannywhac Parts 2 20th August 2009 06:23 AM
Use of PNP transistors instead of NPN in buffer circuit. TB Chip Amps 13 8th October 2007 06:58 AM
Looking 4 a simple NPN/PNP Output stage schematic useing Tip31C/32C Transistors?? Minion Solid State 27 20th April 2007 06:50 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:57 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2