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Old 26th January 2013, 01:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by gootee View Post
But not wanting the external components and traces for the chipamp circuit to break up the planes, I'm thinking the chipamp circuitry, minus capacitors, will have to be on a daughterboard, on very short standoffs, straddling the dividing line between the arrays' power planes, probably over the non-component side of the arrays' board. Then the power and ground pins and connections can all go basically straight down through the daughterboard and into the array board, to either side (power or ground), with minimum connection lengths.
"Daughterboard" is a new term to me, but that is one strategy I'm working on. Thick wires soldered to the pcb traces and short leads to the motherboard is the idea. Poly caps or a couple of small electrolytics can be added to the motherboard as local bypasses. It's all up in the air at this time.

It all started when I was mulling over an iterative parallel op amp headphone amp design (I still am). I was googling around for ideas and parts and I saw one vendor selling exactly such a "daughterboard." It was a compact board with paralleled medium value electrolytics for pretty cheap. So I did some more studying and found out that there were a lot of advantages to paralleling electrolytics vs using one big can. A little quality time with the breadboards and I found out that it does indeed make a subjective difference. And the whole concept dovetails nicely with iterative design. So it's win-win on every front: excellent performance from cheap common parts and simple but clever designs. Why didn't they teach me this stuff in engineering school?
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Old 26th January 2013, 01:53 PM   #12
gootee is offline gootee  United States
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Yeah, an EE degree is like an exquisite set of tools that you don't really know how to use.

I am very grateful to have been provided with the tools. But it would have been nice if there had been some course in "practical theory".

A friend of mine at Purdue got an EET degree at the same time and I think that he DID learn a lot of practical stuff, too. But he only got to sleep about 2-3 hours a night.
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Old 26th January 2013, 05:05 PM   #13
JMFahey is offline JMFahey  Argentina
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Well, I started sudying Engineering in February 1969 .... and had been making Electronic (and not Electronic too) stuff for a few years.
And didn't keep it as a "hobby" but started commercially producing and selling stuff that same month, so .... either had to solve all practical (and *economics*) problems right away, or wouldn't have lasted long.
So far, it worked.
In fact, even some Professors asked me on some practical tips.
Not dissing them, University is the *big* base, but everything else has its value, of course.
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Old 26th January 2013, 05:35 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by JMFahey View Post
Well, I started sudying Engineering in February 1969 .... and had been making Electronic (and not Electronic too) stuff for a few years.
And didn't keep it as a "hobby" but started commercially producing and selling stuff that same month, so .... either had to solve all practical (and *economics*) problems right away, or wouldn't have lasted long.
So far, it worked.
In fact, even some Professors asked me on some practical tips.
Not dissing them, University is the *big* base, but everything else has its value, of course.
liked very true... the black art..
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Old 26th January 2013, 06:59 PM   #15
gootee is offline gootee  United States
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Originally Posted by Fast Eddie D View Post
"Daughterboard" is a new term to me, but that is one strategy I'm working on. Thick wires soldered to the pcb traces and short leads to the motherboard is the idea. Poly caps or a couple of small electrolytics can be added to the motherboard as local bypasses. It's all up in the air at this time.

It all started when I was mulling over an iterative parallel op amp headphone amp design (I still am). I was googling around for ideas and parts and I saw one vendor selling exactly such a "daughterboard." It was a compact board with paralleled medium value electrolytics for pretty cheap. So I did some more studying and found out that there were a lot of advantages to paralleling electrolytics vs using one big can. A little quality time with the breadboards and I found out that it does indeed make a subjective difference. And the whole concept dovetails nicely with iterative design. So it's win-win on every front: excellent performance from cheap common parts and simple but clever designs. Why didn't they teach me this stuff in engineering school?
Just wanted to clarify that by "daughterboars", I was referring to a small pcb with the chipamp on it, plus the input, feedback, muting, and Zobel components.

If the chipamp daughterboard was mounted against the cap-array pcbs, very close to them, so that the chip pins could easily reach either side of the array board, then the only caps needed on the chipamp board would some tiny high-frequency bypass caps for the chip's power pins. It's possible that not even those would be needed.
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Old 27th January 2013, 06:13 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by gootee View Post
Just wanted to clarify that by "daughterboars", I was referring to a small pcb with the chipamp on it, plus the input, feedback, muting, and Zobel components.
OK.

Quote:
If the chipamp daughterboard was mounted against the cap-array pcbs, very close to them, so that the chip pins could easily reach either side of the array board, then the only caps needed on the chipamp board would some tiny high-frequency bypass caps for the chip's power pins. It's possible that not even those would be needed.
That's a great idea. I always keep my leads as short possible and use as big a gauge wire as practical (16 gauge unless you want to use a torch to solder). You can parallel the leads for less inductance.
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Old 27th January 2013, 06:18 AM   #17
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I also solder wire along the pcb power traces. Anything helps, even 24 gauge if that's all you can fit.
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