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Old 20th July 2012, 01:49 AM   #1
Jehan is offline Jehan  Indonesia
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Default interest at v to i amplifier

recently, i have a big interest at v to i amplifier, Mr. Broskie had explained it in his blog. This is his design which are my favorite. Please take a look at it. By the way, aikido v to i will be great, right? i hope Mr. Broskie would post the aikido v to i in his blog soon.
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Old 20th July 2012, 06:48 AM   #2
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Default hope too

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jehan View Post
i hope Mr. Broskie would post the aikido v to i in his blog soon.
I hope too...
Broskie showed many V to I ideas but I am still hungry for new!
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Old 21st July 2012, 08:18 AM   #3
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Default Please, if someone can describe this circuit operation...say..stage by stage

circuit analisis...then i will be gratefull and happy.

I have made some efforts to understand and i could not...only part of the circuit was understood....i am too much lazy, now a days, to install it into the simulator, where i can discover a lot of things related the operation (currents, voltages, gain and all specifications)...i would prefere someone, more skilled than uncle charlie, to explain how this circuit operates.

I would like some serious description, not the" emitter follower sending NFB to the EF from the second VAS mirror referenced by Gate driver chip operating as error amplifier from the mute line"....i would like to understand, not to learn more electronic therms.

It looks interesting..... maybe the chip is the convertion from E/I....well.... audio amplifiers are this kind of converters anyway...but this one looks different.

Also if you can point a link or paper that describes it will be nice.... i am searching for exotic circuit...not some over complicated one, as i do think that complicated things are result of low skilled designer that cover their lack of knowledge installing sophistication in the circuit.

I forgot to say....PLEASE!.....i am deep curious about it....hey PADA!....can you describe?....if you can..please, do it!

This circuit made me feel this way the picture attached show.

regards,

Carlos
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Last edited by destroyer X; 21st July 2012 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 21st July 2012, 08:37 AM   #4
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Default I have found something here

Broskie-Macaulay Amplifier

regards,

Carlos
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Old 21st July 2012, 04:20 PM   #5
sregor is offline sregor  United States
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IC in the middle is just a servo - keep DC out of output.
Input transistors is just level shifting and bias - AC signal at gate of FETs is same as input. FETs convert input voltage to output current. Biased at 4 Amps - one increases current as the other decreases current. No feedback is used. (except for servo)
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Old 22nd July 2012, 01:57 AM   #6
Jehan is offline Jehan  Indonesia
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hi, Destroyer X. The schematic above shows a push pull v to i amplifier. The bjt transistors work as phase splitter for the pmos and nmos. What makes this schematic unique is the pmos and nmos are configured as drain follower (high output impedance), not the usual source follower (low output impedance). The output impedance of v to i amplifier is high and near infinity, unlike the v to v, which is low and near zero. So, with the v to i, you'll get lowest distortion from 1 ohm speaker, and with the V to v, you'll get lowest distortion from 99999999 ohm speaker. The dc servo keep the output free from any dc offset, for the speaker safety. For more instructions, use these url. tubecad.com/2011/11/blog0218.htm and tubecad.com/2011/10/blog0217.htm

Last edited by Jehan; 22nd July 2012 at 02:02 AM.
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Old 22nd July 2012, 07:16 AM   #7
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Default Thank you Sregor and Jehan....you both are clarifying the stuff

Now it is more clear to me..you removed the shadows and the circuit looks familiar.

regards,

Carlos
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Old 25th July 2012, 08:12 AM   #8
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slightly different proposition Ticle Zen Amp
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Old 25th July 2012, 12:52 PM   #9
Jay is offline Jay  Indonesia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by padamiecki View Post
slightly different proposition Ticle Zen Amp
Hi Pawel, try to use Hann windowing in the LTSpice to see the FFT from different perspective. For a single stage output, such performance is imho unacceptable. My concern is that a little bit more complex bias scheme is not expensive but the difference in performance is usually big.

So why not use a better biasing scheme? Two transistors for each current source for example (a-la PMA opamp-based amplifier).

Here is a comparison between your circuit with another one that I created in less than 5 minutes (so I'm not sure if it works but I have seen similar performance and I have set similar performance as standard/benchmark).
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Old 25th July 2012, 01:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay View Post
Hi Pawel, try to use Hann windowing in the LTSpice to see the FFT from different perspective. For a single stage output, such performance is imho unacceptable. My concern is that a little bit more complex bias scheme is not expensive but the difference in performance is usually big.

So why not use a better biasing scheme? Two transistors for each current source for example (a-la PMA opamp-based amplifier).

Here is a comparison between your circuit with another one that I created in less than 5 minutes (so I'm not sure if it works but I have seen similar performance and I have set similar performance as standard/benchmark).
please clarify
at the left is my proposition, right better biasing?
please paste the link for amp you compared or better asc file
thank you in advance!
PS I am glad of my idea not because it is lowthdmaster but no hf harmonics fro a single transistor output
and
output transistors might be srewed ti the heatsink without the isolation
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