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monsterevo 8th June 2012 04:03 AM

Opinions on a Concept
 
Hi guys,

I just wanted to share this idea I had and see if it is worth trying to build. The idea is to take the input then run each channel then divide it into 10 bands and each band leads to its own amplifier stage.

Left channel - 32 hz - Amplifier (Completely separate amplifier stages) -
- 64 hz - Amplifier - Output
- 125 hz - Amplifier - Output
- 250 hz - Amplifier - read above
- 500hz - Amplifier - I'm lazy
- 1 khz - Amplifier - Same here
- 2 khz - Amplifier -
- 4 khz - Amplifier -
- 8 khz - Amplifier -
- 16 khz - Amplifier -
Well, you guys know it goes the same for the right channel. First what I want to know is that if each band gets its own separate amplifier, would there be a increase in sound quality? If the answer is no, well it really is not worth trying to design this amplifier. Secondly, would it work as a headphone amp?I just want to know because I am curious. Be merciful to me oh Audio Masters, I am just, as one who frequents the world wide web would say, a noob.

Thanks.

CBS240 8th June 2012 05:35 AM

You could get a bunch of cheap LM386 chips and test the idea, but it seems like a lot of trouble and you would need a dedicated speaker for each band. Also each band will require a different power range. I think it would be better to make a quality full range amplifer and experiment with passive filters. For example, 4th order Butterworth bandpass filters for the speakers would give very sharp cut off frequency bands. Passive filters for the input could be used as well.



:2c:

jan.didden 8th June 2012 05:57 AM

I think the big problem will be that you'll need a bunch of speaker drivers that you need to get to work in a homogeneous way. I think that will negate any advantages, and then some.
If you know the problems to make a 4-way active system, imagine the problems for a 9-way system ;-)

jan didden

monsterevo 8th June 2012 06:11 AM

Wow 9 way active system is beyond my comprehension.

What if all the bands are mixed back into a single channel? Or am i better off not even dividing up the channel into separate bands?

Thanks

jan.didden 8th June 2012 07:07 AM

What is your reason to think about it? What is the issue you want to solve?

jan

jan.didden 8th June 2012 07:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monsterevo (Post 3051918)
What if all the bands are mixed back into a single channel? Thanks

Obviously then you'r back where you started. ;)

kenpeter 8th June 2012 01:47 PM

It might help certain clipping situations.
The peak of a drum kick isn't going to compress a cymbol flat...

lduarte1973 8th June 2012 02:42 PM

if its for home use make it a 4 way or 3 way plus subs (if you dont want big cabinets)

sreten 8th June 2012 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monsterevo (Post 3051918)
Wow 9 way active system is beyond my comprehension.

What if all the bands are mixed back into a single channel?
Thanks

Hi,

Simply put you can't do that, the amplifiers will "fight" each
other, and basically almost immediately blow each other up.

The idea is a non-starter. One amp per speaker driver works.


rgds, sreten.

CBS240 8th June 2012 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kenpeter (Post 3052281)
It might help certain clipping situations.
The peak of a drum kick isn't going to compress a cymbol flat...

As a drummer I know that the crash cymbal is rarely played without a bass drum or snare note at the same time. This can present a problem if the amplifier differential gain/phase is affected by the signal. Changes in the gain of the amplifier that is related to the signal is called AIM or amplitude intermodulation distortion and this is related back through the feedback loop affecting the imput stage creating phase distortion or PIM. IMO, significant amounts of this type of distortion is very detrimental to the 'sound' of the amplifier. The sound stage suffers greatly and you begin to lose the separation between the instruments in the program material. The bass drum/cymbal is a good test. I think this is part of why many companies 'cheat' and do not use a single amplifier channel for full range to drive a 3 or 4 way speaker with passive crossover networks. That and the extra headroom required.:rolleyes:

But then if I were just trying to make a buck what would I care? THD passes spec so it's high quality right?....:whacko: It seems to be the norm these days. You would think with all the modern advancements in semi fab that the opposite would be the case...:whazzat: This is why audiophiles like myself go to the trouble to learn and design and build my own Hi Fi amplifier.;)


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