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Old 1st October 2003, 05:11 PM   #11
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Default Re: Re: Re: How do you bridge two bridged amplifier?

Quote:
Originally posted by AudioFreak


What you actually want to do is run the 2 bridged amps in series. It takes a very special set of circumstances to allow you to do it but it can be done. Pass Labs X1000 is a perfect example.

According to Richard Clark (first post) he's using generic
car audio amplifiers, nothing special about their design.
In fact, he's using different amplifiers from different manufacturers
with different power ratings.

(assuming X1000 is special - hehe).

A few people say you can do it (two bridged series amplifiers),
but none can offer a method, not even a block diagram.
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Old 1st October 2003, 05:15 PM   #12
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Default Re: Re: Re: Re: How do you bridge two bridged amplifier?

Quote:
Originally posted by thylantyr
A few people say you can do it (two bridged series amplifiers),
but none can offer a method, not even a block diagram.
Unless nobody has shown any proof I would say that the solution doesn't exist until then.
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Old 1st October 2003, 07:39 PM   #13
sam9 is offline sam9  United States
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Even if find a way to do it there will be a question of the load as "seen" by the amp. Normally, a bridged amp will see an 8-ohm load as 4-ohms and a 4-ohm load as 2-ohms. I don't know what would happen in a double bridged configuration but I would sure want to know **before** throwing the switch.

There is something called a "Zero autoformer" (I think) that might be an aid to deal with the situation but they are not cheap. I note that professional amps like QSC, CarverPro etc, often specify configuration option that sound like double bridging. I would bet that they use a transformer to accomplish this. QSC has the schematics for some units available on their website. Maybe you can figure out something from one of those.

My take on bridging is that under most conditions buying a bigger amp is the better an often cheaper solution.
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Old 1st October 2003, 10:32 PM   #14
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Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: How do you bridge two bridged amplifier?

Quote:
Originally posted by peranders

Unless nobody has shown any proof I would say that the solution doesn't exist until then.
/agree

Richard Clark is an audio celebrity, and many many
people take his word and methods to be valid without
bias.

This is one scenerio where he didn't provide the data... yet ...
to support the claim of his experiment.

People on the other forum are very curious too.

I don't want to discredit his experiment, the reason
I came here to find out if someone has seen this before.....
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Old 2nd October 2003, 02:25 AM   #15
AJT is offline AJT  Philippines
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Default crown amps have this

i read in audio magazine, i'm trying to retrieve my copy, crown came up with this type of amp...essentially the principle is that two bridge amps completely isolated from each other electrically but sharing the same chassis....now, since the inputs/outputs are balanced, one is operated in inverting mode, while the other in a non-inverting mode, a bridged out put then can be taken off the red terminal, whilst the black output terminals are tied up....this is how i understand it, maybe djk can explain it better....
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Old 2nd October 2003, 09:04 AM   #16
UrSv is offline UrSv  Sweden
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Series connection of two bridge amps seems perfectly possible to me. Say that one has two (car or others) amps which both have (switching) supplies where the output of the PSU is isolated from the (12 VDC) common ground which they usually are as the PS uses a transformer, AFAIK, so that the supplies for the two amps have no galvanic connection. At the same time assume that they use input transformers (or coupling caps on input AND ground if that should work well) to achieve lift/isolation from the input ground (possibly in order to remove possible ground loop/hum problems common in cars). Each amp is bridged and the respective output voltages have no reference to each other. Now connect two of those amps in series and you have two bridged amps in series. Should work but possibly not that well.

As always I could easily be completely wrong but it seems fairly simple and straightforward to me. No need for anything special or unusual.

Ref: http://sound.westhost.com/project89.htm
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Old 2nd October 2003, 09:09 AM   #17
subwo1 is offline subwo1  United States
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I once floated the inputs to a Kenwood amp to see how much more power bridging gave. The difference was not much after considering how the power supplies load down and the output current through the transistors limits.
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Old 2nd October 2003, 10:50 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by UrSv
Series connection of two bridge amps seems perfectly possible to me. l]
Urban, the concept of series connection is that everything is connected in a long chain. If you have a bridge amp with a connected load how (where) can you put in the another amp?

I think (convinced) that it's impossible.....stop I think I have an

Whay happens if I have transformer connected inputs and the both amps have isolated PS?

Still, less than 3 dB and does it produce high fidelity?
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Old 2nd October 2003, 12:02 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by peranders
Urban, the concept of series connection is that everything is connected in a long chain. If you have a bridge amp with a connected load how (where) can you put in the another amp?
Like this as per the Pass Labs X1000.
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File Type: gif series-bridge.gif (3.6 KB, 368 views)
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Old 2nd October 2003, 02:10 PM   #20
UrSv is offline UrSv  Sweden
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Quote:
Originally posted by peranders

Urban, the concept of series connection is that everything is connected in a long chain. If you have a bridge amp with a connected load how (where) can you put in the another amp?

I think (convinced) that it's impossible.....stop I think I have an

Whay happens if I have transformer connected inputs and the both amps have isolated PS?

Still, less than 3 dB and does it produce high fidelity?
I must be hopelessly unclear today as that is EXACTLY what I tried to describe when I mentioned transformers on the input and isolated PSUs which you repeated again. AudioFreak provided the schematic for it and the only question is what phase he's feeding the setup and depending on that he might have to connect plus to minus or minus to minus.

AudioFreak:
The question was not how to do it technically, as that is quite simple, but rather I was suprised that it could be done with the X1000 as I thought they would not be isolated from eachother thinking they would be sharing a ground connection but then that seems not to be the case. If it was to provide the pic then thanks. Otherwise thanks again...
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