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Old 24th September 2003, 05:30 PM   #1
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Default Floating Transformer Technology

Anyone that knows how Floating Transformer Technology "FTT" works?

This made me wonder how it worked!
"The AW180M from Electrocompaniet incorporates such refined features as: FTT (Floating Transformer Technology) power supply, capable of delivering twice the current of a conventional power supply"

I tried to find some information about it and the only thing I found was Flat Transformer Technology, intersesting but not what I was looking for.

http://www.flattransformer.com/

/Magnus
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Old 24th September 2003, 05:40 PM   #2
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I've been working on a kind of floating transformer design for a couple of months, but havn't yet figured it all out.......
I got a paper stack of 10 cm with different drawings and calulations etc. but havn´t found a design that I dare to build
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Old 24th September 2003, 05:48 PM   #3
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Default Ho ho "dansk jävel" remeber Ernst Hugo?

Well but do you have a general ide how it works? I'm kind of curious here, I haven't even found any of their patent papers.


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Old 24th September 2003, 05:52 PM   #4
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It may be a classical circlotron circuit. That has two power supplies, including the transformers that float up and down with the output voltage. Maybe marketing came up with a new wine in old flasks. Or was it old wine in new flasks?

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Old 24th September 2003, 06:09 PM   #5
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From what I have been reading, the trick may be one of the following configurations (taken into considerations that electric current can't just "float", and that the words "floating transformer" is just a fancy name.....

1
A transformer with no center GND and with to bridged amplifier circuits both resting on half the supply voltage. E.g. if supply voltage is 60V, both the amplifier outputs rests at 30V

2
You have one "high" voltage transformer (e.g. +/- 60V) and amplifier circuit with GND connection, and another smaller one
(+/-10V also with amplifier circuit) which central GND is connected to the output of larger amplifier circuit.
Then you make a cheap high power amplifier, and have the small high quality amplifier to correct all errors from the big amplifier.

3
Same amplifiers as above, but the large amp is connected speaker GND, while the small (inverted) amp is connected to speaker "+" to correct errors from the big amp......

I'm working on the model No. 2 at the moment
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Old 24th September 2003, 06:37 PM   #6
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OK thanks,

I think I understand, some times a bit slow in the morning.
Would you mind share a little drawing so I could see it in front of me and in what way would that double the current in No 2 and 3?

So what is the biggest problems you have to solve with this design No 2?


/Magnus
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Old 24th September 2003, 08:14 PM   #7
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Here is the basic of no. 2 (very simplified):
The first PSU is +/-60 VDC with reference to GND.
The output of the first amplifier is connected to the GND center tap on PSU 2, which supply +/-10 VDC to the second amplifier.

Theori:
Let a cheap Class B amplifier do the high voltage amplification (+/-60 VDC), and then have a High End Class A running at only +/-10 VDC to correct the signal errors from the first amp. and provide the final output.

My problem sofare has been to find a clean reference signal to the feedback of amplifier two.....

Mayby I had gone "blind" on this particular circuit, and doesn't see the obvious solution.......???
So any help are welcome

Sorry for the poor drawing, but I thought it was more important to get something to show you, than to draw a "master piece"
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Old 24th September 2003, 08:16 PM   #8
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By the way!
You write "morning".....
It's 10 o'clock in the evening
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Old 24th September 2003, 09:30 PM   #9
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Default Well I know you don't have morning, I'm swed!

Ok I get it, even if it looks scary shooting output on center tap.

Well I understand that you couldn't get any clear nice feedback from amp two. Just a thought here, wouldn't it be possible to use a third amp, let say a little really good inverted op, that used a clear source on the input to provide a nice fedback to amp2? Well it would be a hell to match it, but in theory maybee?

/Magnus
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Old 24th September 2003, 09:41 PM   #10
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looking again, i think I have a stroke here, I don't get it.

What would the output from amp1 do when it goes on the center tap? and when passing that bridge??? Is it some kind of pulse control?

Okay, it has something to do with the low voltage on trafo 2, I might see what you are doing, I have to think here.

I think you have to explane your thought a little more?

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