Amplifier with 220 input voltage vs 230 ? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 2nd January 2012, 10:29 AM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Default Amplifier with 220 input voltage vs 230 ?

My country using 230v 50 frequencies for imput voltage. If I purchase an amp with 230 input voltage, will the amp suffer short circuit or degradation of sound quality. Appreciate your view. Thanks

Last edited by Johnsont; 2nd January 2012 at 10:43 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 11:23 AM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Anybody have any any idea ? Thanks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 11:36 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
KatieandDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: UK
Is it Solid State (Transistor - MOS-FET) or Valve ?

A solid state amp should be perfectly OK unless it is a ridiculously cheap design. Valve amps are a bit more critical.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 11:56 AM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Did you mean if you buy an amp which runs on 220V and plug that into 230V?

The issue is in my view with the transformers. Good designs will be able to accept all power supply variations, which can vary quite substantially. In the UK the electricity supply has been "normalised" to 230V but in fact because of the tolerances the actual voltage stays at 240V. IF transformers have been designed to run on 220V +/- 6% then 230V MAY just exceed its rating IF this were a little high. In the UK the "230"v is -6,+10% meaning anything from 216 to 253V. It is unfortunate that commercialisation generally means cheap and this means that many transformers no longer have taps to adjust for a few volts up or down on the nominal supply. On the other hand a transformer designed without taps has to be able to operate from a wider (and possibly higher) input voltage than nominal if it is to be used anywhere, which means that the output voltage may vary too. As your previous correspondent noted this may affect valves (heater supplies running hotter), but my point is whether the transformers will work full stop.

UNfortunately this means it is not a case of "yes or no" but "it depends on the design of the transformer"...as well as "the design of the equipment".

You might find someone who could test the unit on a variable supply and make sure that the transformer operates correctly on the highest possible supply voltage without saturating (which would need a scope and resistor to monitor load currents for example, but maybe with an isolating transformer as well...)
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 12:22 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
It is solid state amp. If I would like to prevent any surge just to play safe. What should I get to prevent it ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieandDad View Post
Is it Solid State (Transistor - MOS-FET) or Valve ?

A solid state amp should be perfectly OK unless it is a ridiculously cheap design. Valve amps are a bit more critical.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 12:26 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Thanks for the great input ! If I would lie to play safe, what should I purchase to prevent it ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by john_ellis View Post
Did you mean if you buy an amp which runs on 220V and plug that into 230V?

The issue is in my view with the transformers. Good designs will be able to accept all power supply variations, which can vary quite substantially. In the UK the electricity supply has been "normalised" to 230V but in fact because of the tolerances the actual voltage stays at 240V. IF transformers have been designed to run on 220V +/- 6% then 230V MAY just exceed its rating IF this were a little high. In the UK the "230"v is -6,+10% meaning anything from 216 to 253V. It is unfortunate that commercialisation generally means cheap and this means that many transformers no longer have taps to adjust for a few volts up or down on the nominal supply. On the other hand a transformer designed without taps has to be able to operate from a wider (and possibly higher) input voltage than nominal if it is to be used anywhere, which means that the output voltage may vary too. As your previous correspondent noted this may affect valves (heater supplies running hotter), but my point is whether the transformers will work full stop.

UNfortunately this means it is not a case of "yes or no" but "it depends on the design of the transformer"...as well as "the design of the equipment".

You might find someone who could test the unit on a variable supply and make sure that the transformer operates correctly on the highest possible supply voltage without saturating (which would need a scope and resistor to monitor load currents for example, but maybe with an isolating transformer as well...)
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 01:03 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
In order to be allowed on the market, equipment is tested and must function with a 10% higher voltage than what it is designed for. That means, as long as it has been sold commercially, all 220V equipment will work flawlessly with 230 (and up to 242) volts.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 01:11 PM   #8
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Coconuts,
There's the problem!
You are assuming that a universal 220/240Vac transformer is designed to operate on the full range of supply voltages
Quote:
In the UK the "230"v is -6,+10% meaning anything from 216 to 253V.
but you quote an example that is not universal.
Quote:
all 220V equipment will work flawlessly with 230 (and up to 242) volts.
All transformers, no matter how well they are designed, do not draw a magnetising current that is proportional to the supply voltage. The current variation with supply voltage is non linear. Transformers get hot when the supply voltage is too high, i.e. they draw more current than expected. That extra current does not transfer to the output, it gets dissipated as extra heat in the core.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 01:49 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
One approach I have seen is to use a low voltage transformer- say 12v -which is abnle to work on the avaiulable mains (e.g. 230V) but can drive enough current for the load (which ought to be possible) and connect the secondary in series but out of phase with the mains, which will effectively reduce the mains voltage by 12V.

You will need to make sure that the polarity is right and that you don't add another 12V to the mains instead of subtracting!

I do not recommend this approach myself, but it has been suggested by others.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 01:53 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Indeed, the equipment will run hotter, but still within the allowed limits. If it would get too hot, when running with 10% higher voltage than specified, it would not be allowed on the market.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Amplifier Input Voltage Question AudaciousQuip Car Audio 3 24th August 2011 02:39 AM
120 to 230 voltage automatic switch jlovick Power Supplies 7 7th May 2011 04:07 AM
Amplifier with 220 input voltage, will it work in US? usmcjlp Solid State 5 15th April 2010 06:19 AM
??Convert Voltage from 220 to 100 for Meridian 200 Transport?? Gman111 Digital Source 0 2nd April 2008 07:44 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:07 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2