"State-Of-MOS": 200W Ultra Low Distortion Pure FET Amplifier - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 14th November 2011, 07:52 AM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Default "State-Of-MOS": 500W/4Ohm Ultra Low Distortion Pure FET Amplifier

Note: The original schema in the post was designed for 200W; as the design progressed I scaled up the power to its intended target of 500W into 4 Ohms.

SOM200 - Ultra Low Distortion Pure FET Power Amplifier

Hello everyone!

I promised to give my amp its own thread when I had finished the initial design, but in order not to clutter a different thread, I'll do so now.

I've been designing amps for a while now and while my latests creation has turned out rather well I was inspired by the JFET input, MOSFET VAS, LATERAL output = Perfect!! to design an all-FET power amp.

The goal of this design was to achieve and keep a low THD as development continues. Through careful analysis I've been able to figure out optimal design parameters for each of the amp's sub circuits like IPS, current mirrors, VAS, CCS' and so on.

I've surprised myself. The schematic achieves incredibly low THD. Sub ppm numbers at 20KHz, 200W into 4 ohm resistive. It wasn't an easy way to get there though. I initially set off using ideal current sources and went on by implementing each of them carefully with the goal to stay in the low distortion region. I've got one more ideal CS to go.

Here are some numbers:
Code:
Fourier analysis for $out:
DC component: -8.1332e-007
  No. Harmonics: 20, THD: 1.06368e-005 %, Gridsize: 512, Interpolation Degree: 1
Harmonic Frequency    Magnitude    Phase        Norm. Mag    Norm. Phase 
-------- ---------    ---------    -----        ---------    ----------- 
 1       1000         40.017       -0.018774    1            0           
 2       2000         8.39746e-008 -41.014      2.09847e-009 -40.995     
 3       3000         7.74366e-007 -164.39      1.93509e-008 -164.37     
 4       4000         3.71717e-008 -67.983      9.28897e-010 -67.964     
 5       5000         2.47765e-007 19.1049      6.19148e-009 19.1236     
 6       6000         6.07316e-008 -42.895      1.51764e-009 -42.877     
 7       7000         1.8439e-007  -79.51       4.60778e-009 -79.491     
 8       8000         3.93825e-008 -4.7429      9.84143e-010 -4.7242     
 9       9000         2.86322e-007 108.143      7.15501e-009 108.162     
 10      10000        6.94968e-008 42.6485      1.73668e-009 42.6673     
 11      11000        2.09569e-006 -34.091      5.23699e-008 -34.072     
 12      12000        5.89009e-007 89.7746      1.4719e-008  89.7933     
 13      13000        4.59748e-007 -56.343      1.14888e-008 -56.324     
 14      14000        7.11066e-007 -149.87      1.77691e-008 -149.85     
 15      15000        3.39956e-006 -32.858      8.49528e-008 -32.839     
 16      16000        2.0638e-007  -113.63      5.15732e-009 -113.61     
 17      17000        4.31867e-007 -160.95      1.07921e-008 -160.93     
 18      18000        1.64712e-007 -101.73      4.11605e-009 -101.71     
 19      19000        1.7081e-007  -39.923      4.26844e-009 -39.905     
 20      20000        1.55652e-007 -87.785      3.88966e-009 -87.766
Code:
Fourier analysis for $out:
DC component: 6.14164e-006
  No. Harmonics: 10, THD: 8.37035e-005 %, Gridsize: 256, Interpolation Degree: 1
Harmonic Frequency    Magnitude    Phase        Norm. Mag    Norm. Phase 
-------- ---------    ---------    -----        ---------    ----------- 
 1       20000        40.0087      -0.3756      1            0           
 2       40000        4.66297e-006 -86.343      1.16549e-007 -85.967     
 3       60000        2.26497e-005 8.36849      5.66119e-007 8.74409     
 4       80000        7.37226e-006 89.176       1.84267e-007 89.5516     
 5       100000       2.23136e-005 4.16724      5.5772e-007  4.54284     
 6       120000       5.57379e-007 132.186      1.39315e-008 132.561     
 7       140000       1.59006e-006 43.1607      3.97429e-008 43.5363     
 8       160000       3.54731e-006 92.0763      8.86634e-008 92.4519     
 9       180000       3.17283e-006 0.633482     7.93036e-008 1.00908     
 10      200000       3.0004e-006  96.2616      7.49938e-008 96.6372
I think, even for a simulated schematic, having achieved these numbers into the given load are quite a feat. I definitely intend to build this amp and let my ears be the final judge - but so far, in the numerical domain this amp seems to be a real gem. I am confident that when actually built, the numbers won't be far off - the intrinsic performance isn't much dependant on actual component values. I can state this based on my previous project that showed numbers actually much better than I got in the simulator. I attribute that to the fact that in real, the analog resolution is infinite unlike in a simulator and as a result, would induce artifacts in simulation data. All in all, I'd like to stress that these simulation results are not holy, they are a guidance.

Anyways, the amp is still in its design stage. Once I've completed the final current source (that of the LTP), I'll work towards a prototype and see how it turns out for real. Given my previous experience with creating an amp from simulation to a real, working prototype, this new design is very promising!

I'll be glad to answer questions about the design and otherwise discuss its various aspects.
Attached Images
File Type: png SOM_V1.png (104.3 KB, 2665 views)
__________________
Negative Feedback: The Need for Speed

Last edited by MagicBox; 16th July 2012 at 09:29 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 11:12 AM   #2
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Is q3&4 C19&20 the tracking cascode that you mentioned?
And Q16&17 R28&3 the fixed cascode?

Can you explain the mechanism around the VAS?
__________________
regards Andrew T.

Last edited by AndrewT; 14th November 2011 at 11:14 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 11:53 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Hi Adrew, thanks for asking. Yeah, the two combinations Q3, Q4, R3, C20 and Q16, Q17, R28, C19 are two tracking cascodes. I could do with only one set if it wasn't for the relatively high IPS current, ~ 10mA in each leg of the LTP. The second set is merely to divide the supply voltage. it allows to set the Vds for the JFETs and the second sets the Vds for the first cascode. Here, tracking means that the JFETs see a constant Vds because the cascodes are referenced against the JFET sources.

Q10 in the VAS is also a tracking cascode although here it tracks the the VAS device (Q11) drive. It is biased by R14. R4, R14 and Q7 run approximately 2mA when in equibrilium and C2 bypasses the cascode bias R14 so that for AC signals, Q11 remains the controlling device rather than Q10. Since Q7 doesn't run much current, its drain did not have to go through the cascode and could directly connect to the VAS output. So basically, the source follower FET Q7 also provides a 'moving' BIAS for its cascode rather than running the cascode off an external voltage reference. The cascode's Vgs as a result of its current is no longer 'bouncing' off a fixed reference, impeding linearity but instead gets moved along by the drive of the VAS device.

It may sound complex and crazy, but simulations proved this topology to be much better than a fixed reference cascode.

The VAS current is about 15mA. It's set by JFET Q13 in the CCS for the VAS. Here I've used a current mirror to in order to replace the JFET load with a fixed reference cascode Q18 as the CCS output cascode Q12 is subject to voltage swings over its drain. It makes for a great performning CCS I think.
__________________
Negative Feedback: The Need for Speed
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 12:32 PM   #4
Account disabled at member's request
 
Join Date: May 2006
Hi Magicbox

Interesting the design has become a bit more complex. Could you perhaps show the schematic with a white background, I find it hard to follow with my laptop.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 12:34 PM   #5
qusp is offline qusp  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
qusp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
interesting i think i'll wait till i have a bit more working knowledge behind me before i attempt to build such a thing, but the ccs sounds quite intriguing
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 01:01 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by homemodder View Post
Hi Magicbox

Interesting the design has become a bit more complex. Could you perhaps show the schematic with a white background, I find it hard to follow with my laptop.
I'll add a black on white schematic for convenience. Unfortunately yes, the schematic became a little more complex mainly because I wanted to shoot for a higher power output which resulted in an extra cascode set in the IPS and a cascode for the VAS. And not unsignificantly, two ideal CS' have now been implemented as well.

Other than that, the base schematic should still be recognizable. The only thing that changed compared to the base schematic is that the drain of the source follower FET is no longer connected to GND, but directly to the VAS north-side. Having given the VAS a higer Iq, it is fast enough to drive a much larger voltage swing

You'll find a black-on-white schematic attached to this post.
Attached Images
File Type: png SOM_V1BW.png (48.0 KB, 2459 views)
__________________
Negative Feedback: The Need for Speed

Last edited by MagicBox; 14th November 2011 at 01:10 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 02:12 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Pretoria
Interesting.

You might find that the THD e.a. numbers go up a bit when you replace that 23mA current source with real components, though....
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 02:13 PM   #8
Account disabled at member's request
 
Join Date: May 2006
Magicbox, well I take my hats off, Ive been a member here for over 5 years and your tracking cascode is only the second significant development Ive seen here. Other designs around here are mostly what has been done for the last 30 years with a little tweak here and there but the basics remain the same. Edmond Stuart s TMC was the first. Kenpeter and Elvee are two other members thinking out of the box and come up with some inovative ideas never seen or used before.

Ignoring all the current sources (I prefer simple circuits) I find your vas most excellent indeed. If you dont mind Im going to make a comparison with my idea, I think the two will be very close in comparison, as the principle is very much the same, I just did it a little different and name it something else. One can do magic with Mosfets if you can think outside the box.

Very noble of you to show it here, if patents werent so useless as its very difficult to patrol and costly too, it would be the wise way for you to go.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 02:25 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by ingenieus View Post
Interesting.

You might find that the THD e.a. numbers go up a bit when you replace that 23mA current source with real components, though....
Yes, it does. But the critical job for this CS is to make sure the current through each JFET biasses them just below their forward bias point. Too few / too much current degrades performance. I've found the sweet spot to be around a Vgs of 0V, ever so slightly negative.

Knowing this, I have to make this CS in such way I can reasonably adjust it without introducing too much noise into the circuit. I plan to do this with a current mirror so I can use a high voltage for a regular source follower with an adjustable input voltage. I'll figure out a way
__________________
Negative Feedback: The Need for Speed
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th November 2011, 02:28 PM   #10
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Quote:
Originally Posted by MagicBox View Post
JFET biasses them just below their forward bias point. Too few / too much current degrades performance. I've found the sweet spot to be around a Vgs of 0V, ever so slightly negative.
similar to the Pass B1 and Curl.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"The Wire" Ultra-High Performance Headphone Amplifier - PCB's opc Headphone Systems 2163 18th July 2014 08:29 PM
ultra low noise low distortion preamplifier needed neazoi Solid State 13 11th October 2011 01:03 PM
The "Freebird" ultra clean ultra simple preamp design Russ White Chip Amps 87 11th August 2008 09:28 AM
Seeking a "pure digital amplifier" ... MarkZ Class D 10 28th December 2005 02:58 AM
mos-fet amplifier question ... B.I.G Solid State 29 1st March 2005 08:13 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:58 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2