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Old 21st September 2011, 08:22 PM   #1
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Default Solid state tutorial

Hi to every body.
I was looking for some information about crossover distortion and found this site with a good tutorial that I decided to share it with the Diyaudio members. The tutorial is good for newbies since it is explained the appliers design with drawings and examples. Enjoy it.

Here is the link Introduction to the Amplifier Tutorial

Regards,
tauro0221
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Old 21st September 2011, 08:35 PM   #2
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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That article contains a few mistakes and minor confusions, so be careful. OK as a place to start from, but don't take it as absolute truth.

Examples:
it confuses 'perfect' with 'ideal'
it says Class B has "maximum theoretical efficiency of about 70%"; the correct figure is about 78% (actually pi/4).
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Old 21st September 2011, 09:07 PM   #3
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Hi,
Thank you for make the corrections but like you said for starter is good to read and learn.
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Old 21st September 2011, 10:44 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
That article contains a few mistakes and minor confusions, so be careful. OK as a place to start from, but don't take it as absolute truth.
That is a common problem for instructors who try to present fundamental concepts, without cluttering the explanation with subtleties, details, exceptions, etc.

Another example:
". . . Gain is a ratio, it has no units but is given the symbol "A" . . . "
Often true, especially when considering "gain" in a strictly mathematical sense. But even if you ignore the common use of decibel notation, engineers often scale gain values to, for example, "V/mV" or "V/uV". And then there are the cases where it's more informative to use concepts such as transconductance gain, with units of Siemens (or mhos) and symbolized as "gm".

And we haven't even begun to touch on the fact that "gain" has both magnitude and phase angle; and the "gain" value of practical circuits typically varies with frequency as well as signal level, etc, etc . . .

See what I mean about the challenges to an author who wants to present a basic concept?

Nevertheless . . . that web page is well organized and quite informative!

Dale
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Old 21st September 2011, 11:18 PM   #5
Ron AKA is offline Ron AKA  Canada
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You can find a good set of articles at this link.
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