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Old 7th September 2011, 01:36 PM   #1
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Default connecting two 110v amplifiers in series on 220v mains

Hi everyone, i have two Sony vintage 330ES series amplifiers... excellent build, even the regulation coapacitors are held on absortptive velevet rtrip and stripped to reduced vibration, an out class toridal transformer and so on. i have two of them and both are 110 volt input, my question is that can i wire them in series , the primarr side and plug it into 220 v main supply ???? i would thenn avoid the need to have a step down transforer for each ???
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Old 7th September 2011, 02:11 PM   #2
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NO! The current draw and the voltage division varies with the signal!
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Old 7th September 2011, 02:13 PM   #3
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
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Another NO!
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Old 7th September 2011, 02:14 PM   #4
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NO NO NO NEVER 220volts will not split 50% - 50%

You need a transformer ..... to make shure voltage is constant and at the correct value.


You may check inside the amplifier .... some units have multi winding transformer and can de modified to work on 220 volts.
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Old 7th September 2011, 02:15 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewT View Post
Another NO!
Oh in that case you should do it as on general principle AndrewT is always wrong!


(Don't try it you will blow stuff up. Even if you can get it to work they won't sound right as you will have raised the impedance of the AC source, a very important consideration in that style amplifier circuit.)
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Old 7th September 2011, 03:03 PM   #6
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Quote:
The 330ES was a general export model that had a voltage selector, otherwise, it's a N55ES.
rgds, sreten.
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There is nothing so practical as a really good theory - Ludwig Boltzmann
When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail - Abraham Maslow
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Old 7th September 2011, 03:38 PM   #7
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Another NO.

Messing around with electricity is a very bad idea.

Click the image to open in full size.

The damage in the picture was caused by an electric blanket, but you get the idea.

http://local.stv.tv/edinburgh/news/2...ingside-blaze/

Last edited by ingenieus; 7th September 2011 at 03:44 PM.
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Old 7th September 2011, 06:07 PM   #8
DF96 is online now DF96  England
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You don't need a step-down transformer for each. They can share one bigger step-down transformer - both wired in parallel in the normal way. You can't wire them in series as you were hoping.
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Old 7th September 2011, 06:14 PM   #9
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Can I bung in a 'NO' here as well?

It's good initial thinking, and indeed the idea would work with, say, 2 lamps of the same wattage.

The load presented by each amp, although theoretically the same, won't be in practice and one will receive an over-voltage which it probably won't like.
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Old 7th September 2011, 09:28 PM   #10
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ok lets see it this way..... its two channel bridgeable amplifier , when we run a bridge amplifier it inverts the signal of one of the channel 180 degree out of phase with the main signal , so let L1 be the (left channel of amp 1) be brdiged with R2 ( the right channel of the second amp) in this ways the impedance as seen from load side for each transformer would be the same, similarly R1 could be bridged with L2 , for all 4 inputs i am hoping to use all 4 channels for LFE output........needs some serious Electrical Engineering modeling here..... difficult but i think possible.....lets start to scratch our EE heads???
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