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Old 7th August 2011, 05:59 PM   #1
Frosteh is offline Frosteh  United States
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Default Two transformers on one AC plug?

I'll be housing multiple amps in the same enclosure and I'm wondering if I can hook up multiple transformers to the same AC plug on the chassis. They will all be on/off at the same time, so I'm not worried about that.
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Old 7th August 2011, 07:23 PM   #2
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I'll be housing multiple amps in the same enclosure and I'm wondering if I can hook up multiple transformers to the same AC plug on the chassis. They will all be on/off at the same time, so I'm not worried about that.
Yes you can, and it is done frequently. The only thing to watch out for is the mains side fuse. One fuse per transformer would be ideal, particularly if there is one huge transformer and one small one, when a fuse large enough for the biggy would not be offering much protection for the small one.
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Old 7th August 2011, 07:27 PM   #3
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As long as they do not exceed the rated loading of the AC circuit (15Amp in NA), why not. You could fuse each transformer seperately to aid any troubleshooting down the road. E
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Old 7th August 2011, 08:02 PM   #4
Frosteh is offline Frosteh  United States
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Originally Posted by mickeymoose View Post
As long as they do not exceed the rated loading of the AC circuit (15Amp in NA), why not. You could fuse each transformer seperately to aid any troubleshooting down the road. E
Since you brought up loading of the circuit, is there a max wattage that can be handled in NA? or is it up to the duty of the circuit breaker. I'm wondering if I'll trip the breaker when I put this in my dorm room.
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Old 7th August 2011, 08:04 PM   #5
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Since you brought up loading of the circuit, is there a max wattage that can be handled in NA? or is it up to the duty of the circuit breaker. I'm wondering if I'll trip the breaker when I put this in my dorm room.
It's up to the circuit breaker. Typical max is 15A per, though special outlets can give 20A (or more).
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Old 7th August 2011, 10:49 PM   #6
Frosteh is offline Frosteh  United States
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Originally Posted by 454Casull View Post
It's up to the circuit breaker. Typical max is 15A per, though special outlets can give 20A (or more).
I know 15 is normal amperage, but what about wattage?
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Old 7th August 2011, 11:04 PM   #7
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Hmmm ... what are you studying?

Volts x Amps = Watts. But with non-resistive loads (eg Transformers) the phase-angle has to be taken into account.

Google it!
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Old 7th August 2011, 11:11 PM   #8
Frosteh is offline Frosteh  United States
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Hmmm ... what are you studying?

Volts x Amps = Watts. But with non-resistive loads (eg Transformers) the phase-angle has to be taken into account.

Google it!
So 1800 watts... Guess I won't be taking my computer to college with me.
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Old 7th August 2011, 11:25 PM   #9
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Why not?
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Old 7th August 2011, 11:26 PM   #10
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Your PC should be fine.

We recently moved from having an old 'fuse box' that actually had wire fuses in and powering any large transformer was never a problem. We changed over to one with circuit breakers and every large transformer in the house would trip the breakers on powering on. A soft-start circuit was required to circumvent this, obviously a soft start is useful for other reasons beyond tripping the primary breaker, but still, bare this in mind.
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