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Old 9th March 2011, 05:21 PM   #1
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Default PCB for this amp?

Hi all

I found this scheme for the Crest 7001 pwr amp.

But could not find the PCB does someone know where to get it ?
And is this amp good ? for non comercial use

Thanks this is my first amp but i've made a cnc mil for the PCB so im not a complete beginer to electronics.
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Old 10th March 2011, 03:27 PM   #2
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anyone ??

What about the crest ca9 ??
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Old 10th March 2011, 04:45 PM   #3
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It is unlikely that Crest will supply you with the PCB or give you the layout files as it is part of their intellectual property and sometimes much more time is spent on PCB layout than on schematic design (they already have designs to base the next project on). Also, the PCB layout would be of no meaningful use to a DIY'er as the layout is probably too complicated to DIY and it is not needed for general servicing on the amp (a schematic will do here).

It is unlikely that a PA amplifier will be suitable as a home amplifier due to the differences in what the amps are meant to do. A PA amplifier is unlikely to sound as good as a hi-fi amp for a number of reasons.

Why is it that you have chosen this specific amp to clone? Do you want a hi-fi amp for use at home or a PA amp with raw power? Or a mix of both? There are plenty of designs around here that have PCB images that you could use and you are guaranteed to find one with the spec's you are looking for.
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Old 10th March 2011, 04:50 PM   #4
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Thakns for that.

Im lookin for an mixed amp, I want to use it for a quitar amp and sometimes for listening music. And i have chosen the specific one becouse i did not find an DIY circuit for a 2x500W at 8ohm. If you saw a circuit somwhere I would really appreciate it if you would tell me.
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Old 10th March 2011, 06:52 PM   #5
norazmi is offline norazmi  Malaysia
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Hi Nitro,

You want Mixer Amp, and playing guitar, and also for listening.... did you really need 2x500w 8ohm? At home use you ears cant handle it.. try something like 100-200w at 8 ohm its powerful enough for home use. Powerful sound at home will effect your ears and you will become unstable because body control system is in ur head its not good..

regards.
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Old 10th March 2011, 07:06 PM   #6
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Also, if you wanted an amp for both music and playing guitar, it is likely that an extra pre-amp will be needed to bring the guitar output level up to the input level on the amp.

A PA amplifier definitely isn't the solution to this, they (can) make too much noise because of fans, can only accept one input level (higher than that of a guitar-usually a mixer output) and are generally pretty poor compared to a proper hi-fi amp. I'm thinking more along the lines of a small mixer/amp where you have the facility to connect a guitar to one channel and a stereo source to the other (perhaps mixed down to mono). Either way, you will have to decide what your main use for it will be because an amp designed for guitar is unlikely to sound too good when used in a home listening situation.

As for the output power, I think a compromise between the 500W of a PA amp and the typical 50-100W of a hi-fi amp would be the best idea. Perhaps in the range of 150 to 200 watts. Once again, you will have to decide what use you will mainly use it for as this will be the main factor in deciding the power you need.

On a side note, here is a link to a tried and tested 500W PA amp from apexaudio. He supplies PCB images and schematics for pretty much all of his designs and many people have discussed improvements for his designs. Here is the link: 500W PA amplifier with Limiter
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Old 10th March 2011, 07:12 PM   #7
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that really helped me.

could you tell me when the amp is 500W at 4 ohm ? (i didn't find this information in the first 6 pages)
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Old 10th March 2011, 07:28 PM   #8
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Yes that amp should push 500W into 4 ohms but peak power will probably be much higher than that. Have a read through the rest of the thread and if the information doesn't come up, simply add a new post.

I do worry whether someone who has to ask questions such as this is capable of building an amp of this power. +/-90V rails means around 180V across the two rails which would cause some damage and would possibly be fatal if wired incorrectly or if accidental contact was made. I'm not trying to put you down here, it is just with *some* people (I do say some-not all people are the same), it is necessary to force them to do a reality check and think about what they are doing. I know if you haven't made something before and are eager to try out new equipment, it can be tempting to go for something really big and powerful. Most of the time, when things don't work properly because of their complexity, that can be even more annoying and discourage people altogether. Starting with something simple and working upwards is certainly the best way.

Not only is there the complexity of the amp itself but also the surrounding circuitry-the size of the transformer needed for that amp would definitely need a soft start adding more complexity and cost to the project.

Please don't think I'm writing this just to put you off but it is important for safety's sake and would have been said by any other forum member if it hadn't been said by me.
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Old 10th March 2011, 07:37 PM   #9
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I just wanted to ask you if this would really be possible to put 90 +/- on this amp. But I have an anwser. I would not say that this amp is to complex for me as I said i'm not new to electronics im new to amplifiers and I had trouble understanig the princip of amplifiers becouse we don't do this things in school (Mechatronics student, 2nd year) and you are not putting me off fo sure. I'm glad that someone explains stuff to me.
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Old 10th March 2011, 08:37 PM   #10
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Make this tested amp and 500W on 8 ohm is guaranteed.
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