Sansui AU 707 G Extra!! Amp Details - diyAudio
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Old 31st July 2003, 04:32 PM   #1
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Default Sansui AU 707 G Extra!! Amp Details

My friend passed me on this amp which has been lying in storage for the last 10 years. Don't know if it works but I think at least I can salvage some parts (transformer, Heat sink, knobs etc.) Does any body here have any idea as to how good is this amp and also is it worthwile trying to bring it back to life. The build is excellent and is very heavy amp. Also it looks like a japanese model with 100v 50/60HZ supply. Can I run it here in US????

thanks,
Dinesh
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Old 31st July 2003, 04:56 PM   #2
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Hi Dinesh

Don’t dismantle this old beauty.
Is it this one: http://www.sansui.us/images/AU707/au707_6.jpg ?
It’s build around 1976
If there’s no voltage selector switch inside you will have to run it with a transformer (220V->110V )
What’s wrong with it?

/Hugo
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Old 31st July 2003, 05:33 PM   #3
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It is a japanese model I think and is made for 100V 50/60HZ. I want to be sure I can plug it into 120V US voltage to test it. Iam not sure if thats possible. Also the main power cord has the japanese style recepticle with holes in it. Any help would be appreciated.
thanks
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:05 PM   #4
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nice amp but I think it is newer than 1976 maybe early 80`s went all the gear went to a black finish from japanese products
I still have a turntable and tapedeck from 84 era that work flawless
that amp is a definate keeper and I would not strip it


DIRT®
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:12 PM   #5
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Might be useful for your computer speakers, but IME listening to Sansui (soundsscrewy) amps of that period is like having a disc sander applied to your ears.
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:17 PM   #6
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Although it doesn't look like '76 it is indeed from that time period http://www.retroaudio.ru/sansui/integ/AU-707.shtml
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:22 PM   #7
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Gents,
My main question is can I run 100V 50/60Hz stuff on US main supply of 115-120V???? and the amp looks exactly like the one pictured here except it is G series instead of F:

http://www.retroaudio.ru/sansui/inte...07F%20EX.shtml
Also there is lot of instruction on the back panel which is in japanese.
thanks
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:46 PM   #8
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You might be able to use it with 120V, but it's a risk, as all unregulated voltages will go up 20%. This may go beyond electrolytic capacitors rating and may produce too much heat on regulators. You could use a variac to lower AC voltage to 100v or use a series high power resistor with primary, although I'm not sure how would this work.
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:47 PM   #9
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Sorry, you'll need a 120V->100V transformer.
Unless AC-voltage experts tell you can safely connect it to 120V.
The mains voltage here in Belgium used to be 220VAC.
Now it's about 236VAC. Still not 20% as from 100 to 120.

/Hugo
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Old 31st July 2003, 06:48 PM   #10
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Default NO NO NO

please remove the transformer and put one in that will take 115 volts in.

You should know that power spikes in the US, depending on where you live grow from low 105 volts all the way up to 130 volts (Federal Way, WA) and that would be not healty for your equipment.

so take a look at MECI, ALLELECTRONICS or others and alter it quickly!

J-P
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