diyAudio

diyAudio (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/)
-   Solid State (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/solid-state/)
-   -   Class A Listening fatigue (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/solid-state/179267-class-listening-fatigue.html)

rcollege 16th December 2010 03:35 PM

Class A Listening fatigue
 
I have made a Class A amp using single mosfet and others using BJT or a Darlington for the only active component.
While it sounds deep and rich...great imaging, transparency and detail...I can't listen long without experiencing listening fatigue...I am not playing at loud volumes. I experience this both when the highs are overpowered by the lows and when the highs are a little bright.
I have been unorthodox in using a switching power supply that switches at a rate well into the GHZ.

Could the switching power supply cause the fatigue?...(the sound of tv's and computer monitors used to drive me crazy)
Or would second order Harmonics play a role in this?
Or both?
I got the THD down to .3% on the simulator ( not the most accurate) and I hear very little distortion...but the ear is not the most accurate for THD...just the most accurate for what sounds right.

tinitus 16th December 2010 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcollege (Post 2400856)
I experience this both when the highs are overpowered by the lows and when the highs are a little bright.

I would like to see your speakers

AndrewT 16th December 2010 04:08 PM

ClassA listening fatigue and switching PSU
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rcollege (Post 2400856)
Could the switching power supply cause the fatigue?...

this does not sound like a nice combination.
Let's see the schematics and the build.

Root2 16th December 2010 04:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcollege (Post 2400856)
I have made a Class A amp using single mosfet and others using BJT or a Darlington for the only active component.
While it sounds deep and rich...great imaging, transparency and detail...I can't listen long without experiencing listening fatigue...I am not playing at loud volumes. I experience this both when the highs are overpowered by the lows and when the highs are a little bright.
I have been unorthodox in using a switching power supply that switches at a rate well into the GHZ.

Could the switching power supply cause the fatigue?...(the sound of tv's and computer monitors used to drive me crazy)
Or would second order Harmonics play a role in this?
Or both?
I got the THD down to .3% on the simulator ( not the most accurate) and I hear very little distortion...but the ear is not the most accurate for THD...just the most accurate for what sounds right.

GHz SMPSU I would love to see that sounds like fun.

WuYit 16th December 2010 04:24 PM

Hi,
the cure is a decent (big & bulky) power supply.

Root2 16th December 2010 05:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WuYit (Post 2400911)
Hi,
the cure is a decent (big & bulky) power supply.

Regulated or just Bulk caps, and how fast if regulated should the feedback control be for the PSU? any thoughts?

WuYit 16th December 2010 06:21 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Root2,
just bulk caps will not suffice, either choke regulation or something like this:

pieter t 16th December 2010 06:48 PM

Maybe too much odd order distortion?
The second order distortion should not harm sonically, but 3rd, 5th a.s.o. might and even low values are audible.
Could be the price for a very simple amp.

Rikard Nilsson 16th December 2010 07:21 PM

I seriously doubt that listening fatigue is down to the amp itself, unless it oscillates or produces extreme amounts of overtones. Listening fatigue in my experience is usually what happens if you listen to a non flat frequency respons, which is usually caused by room influence, or the speakers themselves. Especially, if you have a peak in the region where the human ear is most sensivite, 2-5 kHz, you are very likely to find it fatiguing, even if this initially might be experienced as "great imaging" and detail.

Just my 5 cents worth.......

:)

Bigun 16th December 2010 08:19 PM

Could it be the source and not the amp ?


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:07 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2